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Stroke Achievement Award Presented

Medical Center is Recognized for Higher Standard of Stroke Care

The American Stroke Association has awarded Cedars-Sinai with its "Get with the Guidelines-Stroke Gold Performance Achievement Award." The award, which was presented recently at the International Stroke Conference 2008 in New Orleans, recognizes Cedars-Sinai's success in implementing a higher standard of stroke care for at least 24 months.

To receive the award, honorees have to demonstrate 85 percent adherence to the association's "Get with the Guidelines-Stroke" key measures for 24 or more consecutive months. These measures include aggressive use of medications like tPA, anti-thrombotics, anticoagulation therapy, DVT prophylaxis, cholesterol-reducing drugs and smoking cessation.

Cedars-Sinai's Stroke Program is a multidisciplinary center that focuses its efforts on aggressive prevention of future stroke, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of stroke and stroke-related disorders. David Palestrant, M.D., is interim director of the Stroke Program and director of the Neuro Critical Care Program.

"The award is a tribute to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's dedication to patient care. The Get with the Guidelines stroke measures are rigorous, complex to implement and take a large amount of work and dedication by the stroke program members and the treating neurologists, as well as the institutional will to implement," said Dr. Palestrant.

"All this work has paid off, and we have been able to dramatically improve stroke patient care to the point that we are one of only 32 hospitals out of a total 1,248 participating hospitals who have obtained and maintained this level of care. Perhaps more important is that the program gives us solid statistics to know how we are doing and to constantly strive to maintain and improve our level of care," he said.

According to the American Stroke Association, approximately 780,000 people suffer a stroke each year. Of those, 600,000 are first attacks and 180,000 are recurrent.