Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

Staffing Shortage in Pain Management

Effective immediately, due to a temporary shortage of nurse practitioners, the Inpatient Pain Service will limit the scope of its services to the following categories:

» Read more

Ob/Gyn to Go Live on CS-Link and OBIX

Labor and Delivery will be replacing their current monitoring and documentation software this Friday night (Saturday morning) at 12:01 am on Aug. 20. Physicians in the Department of Ob/Gyn and nurses working on Labor and Delivery are being trained to use the new software (Stork and OBIX).  

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees from July

Thirty-two physicians were honored by the Circle of Friends program in July.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. In addition to these physicians, 29 others were recognized.

» Read more

Learn about the Next Medical Mission to Guatemala at Aug. 28 Meeting

Would you like to participate in a medical mission in Guatemala? A team of volunteers is planning to aid residents of the Central American country from April 21-30, 2012.

» Read more

EIS Now Supports Apple Desktops, Laptops

As of Aug. 17, EIS is now fully supporting Apple desktops and laptops as an alternate standard to "WinTel" PCs. A support team of experienced and Apple-certified desktop engineers and technicians has been assembled to address all of your Apple support and repair needs, and arrangements have been made with a local authorized dealer and repair center for expedited delivery of parts, devices and software.

» Read more

Timing is Key for Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy

Research Corner

While deep brain stimulation has gained recognition by referring physicians as a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, just half of the patients they recommend are appropriate candidates to begin this relatively new therapy immediately, according to researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.

» Read more

Staffing Shortage in Pain Management

Effective immediately, due to a temporary shortage of nurse practitioners, the Inpatient Pain Service will limit the scope of its services to the following categories:

  • Patients during the immediate post-operative period, including patients with indwelling epidural catheters or any other catheter dedicated to pain management.
  • Acute traumatic pain (e.g.: multiple rib fractures, etc.)
  • Management of intrathecal pumps
  • Pain management for any patients admitted to PICU, NICU or 4NE
  • Consultations for interventional pain management

The protocol to request a consultation remains the same. The requesting healthcare professional must call ext. 3-5870, state the reason for the consultation, and leave a telephone number to receive calls or text messaging from the IPS. If you prefer, IPS can communicate with you via email.

Ob/Gyn to Go Live on CS-Link and OBIX

Labor and Delivery will be replacing their current monitoring and documentation software this Friday night (Saturday morning) at 12:01 am on Aug. 20. Physicians in the Department of Ob/Gyn and nurses working on Labor and Delivery are being trained to use the new software (Stork and OBIX). 

There are hundreds of different software products used throughout the hospital. Those that are not compatible with CS-Link™ will eventually need to be replaced. Labor and Delivery is such an example. Switching to Stork and OBIX will introduce some electronic documentation now, and allows Labor and Delivery to implement the remaining aspects of CS-Link (including physician order entry) when the rest of the hospital goes live with IP3 in March.

For more information, please reach out to the CS-Link project team by emailing cshelp@cshs.org.

Circle of Friends Honorees from July

Thirty-two physicians were honored by the Circle of Friends program in July.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Gabriel Hunt Jr., MD
  • Glenn D. Braunstein, MD
  • Jay L. Jordan, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Michael Chaikin, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Scott A. Cunneen, MD
  • Ronald Leuchter, MD
  • William Fein, MD
  • Pedro R. Lowenstein, MD, PhD
  • David E. Fermelia, MD
  • Jonathan I. Macy, MD
  • Charles Forscher, MD
  • Jeffrey Rapp, MD
  • Alex Foxman, MD
  • Stacey P. Rosenbaum, MD
  • Gerhard Fuchs, MD
  • Gregory Sarna, MD
  • Donna Gallik, MD
  • David N. Sayah, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Joel M. Geiderman, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA
  • Leo A. Gordon, MD
  • Siamak Tabib, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Clement Yang, MD

Learn about the Next Medical Mission to Guatemala at Aug. 28 Meeting

Would you like to participate in a medical mission in Guatemala? A team of volunteers is planning to aid residents of the Central American country from April 21-30, 2012.

Those interested in learning more about this opportunity are invited to an informational meeting at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 28, in Thalians Auditorium.

The annual mission is arranged by HELPS International, a nonprofit organization that supports volunteer work in Guatemala. People with both clinical and administrative experience, as well as friends and family members, are welcome.

This past spring, nearly 100 volunteers – the majority from Cedars-Sinai – took part in the mission. The team helped more than 1,000 patients.

For more information, please contact Olivia Marroquin at olivia.marroquin@cshs.org, Jim Laur at james.laur@cshs.org, or Babak Larian, MD, at larianb@yahoo.com.

Click here to read about the mission that occurred earlier this year.

EIS Now Supports Apple Desktops, Laptops

As of Aug. 17, EIS is now fully supporting Apple desktops and laptops as an alternate standard to "WinTel" PCs. A support team of experienced and Apple-certified desktop engineers and technicians has been assembled to address all of your Apple support and repair needs, and arrangements have been made with a local authorized dealer and repair center for expedited delivery of parts, devices and software.

As part of the support effort, EIS will be identifying the existing Apple devices on the Cedars-Sinai network and offering assistance to Mac users to bring them up to date with best practices and medical center standards for email configuration, OS X version, Microsoft Office, antivirus software and hard disk encryption.

The Mac version of Microsoft Office is covered for updates under our CSMC-Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. How-to videos are available to Cedars-Sinai users who wish to expand their knowledge of Apple software.

As with all other desktop support, please call the EIS Help Desk at (310) 423-6428 if you have a question about Apple software or a problem with any Cedars-Sinai-owned Apple desktop, laptop or mobile device. A new problem ticket will be created and assigned to the Apple Support Team.

Please feel free to email Chief Technology Officer Ray Duncan or the manager of the Apple Support Team, Amor Garlitos-Gonzales, with your feedback and suggestions.

Timing is Key for Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy

Research Corner

While deep brain stimulation has gained recognition by referring physicians as a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders, just half of the patients they recommend are appropriate candidates to begin this relatively new therapy immediately, according to researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.

They looked back to a 2004 study, which found that just 5 percent of referrals then were good candidates; they compared their new figures and surmised that referring physicians have increased their awareness and acceptance of deep brain stimulation, a therapy in which electrical leads, linked to a control device, are surgically and precisely implanted to modulate defective nerve signals in the brain to calm symptoms of Parkinson's and other movement disorders.

But physicians still often refer patients for this therapy before other treatment options have been exhausted or because they have unrealistically high expectations for it, said Michele Tagliati, MD, director of the Movement Disorders Program at Cedars-Sinai's Department of Neurology (pictured at right). He is senior author of an Aug. 11 Archives of Neurology article and an expert in device programming, which fine-tunes stimulation for individual patients.

Of 197 patients referred for evaluation for deep brain stimulation, 50 percent were found to be good candidates for immediate therapy, 25 percent were possible future candidates and 24 percent were poor candidates because of other neurological or medical conditions. Analyzing the referral sources – movement disorder specialists, primary care physicians, general neurologists, other physicians and patients – the researchers found that movement disorder specialists referred more patients and most were good therapy candidates.

Over the four-year study period, which ended in late 2009, researchers noted that the number of patients referred for DBS therapy at earlier stages of the disease increased.

"The study does not address this change specifically and we have no proof, but we speculate that doctors became more liberal in sending patients for surgery for deep brain stimulation," Tagliati said. Maybe they are accepting this therapy more and sending patients earlier for it instead of at the very end stage of disease. While doctors may be sending some patients too early to be treated immediately with DBS therapy, it's better to see these patients too early than too late. As long as they're evaluated in a responsible, reputable movement disorders center, they can be reevaluated months or even years later and have the surgery appropriately timed.

"It isn't always clear exactly what is the right time for this therapy, but especially for Parkinson's disease, if the patient is amenable to medication changes, it is not appropriate to jump to the surgery right away," he said.

Deep brain stimulation was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for essential tremor in 1997, Parkinson's disease in 2002, dystonia in 2003 and extreme cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder in 2009.