Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF June 24, 2011 Issue | Archived Issues

4 South Closure for HEPA Filter Project

As previously communicated, we are closing 4 South in July for approximately two weeks so that we can upgrade the HVAC system and enhance the environmental controls in 4SW. We will do everything possible to minimize any disruption to patient care during this planned renovation.

» Read more

Save Your Spot at Sand N' Snore

It's not too early to dig out the tent and camping gear for this year's Sand N' Snore. The dinner, sleepover and breakfast starts Friday, July 15, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica.

Please reserve your tickets by Tuesday, July 5, by calling (310) 423-2681.

» Read more

Q&A with the New Chair of OB/GYN

Sarah J. Kilpatrick, M.D., Ph.D., a nationally renowned expert in maternal-fetal medicine and women’s health, is the newly appointed chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai. Sinai. She was recruited from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she was the head of OB/GYN and vice dean for the College of Medicine.


» Read more

Hotline Answers Clinicians' Computer Questions

A special hotline has been set up to help clinicians with all their CS-Link and Web/VS questions. For immediate assistance, you can dial ext. 3-6428, option 3. A dedicated physician line is available at ext. 3-2828.

» Read more

Prochlorperazine 10mg/2ml Injection Vial Shortage

Pharmacy Focus

Please note that there is once again an acute shortage of prochlorperazine (Compazine®) 10mg/2ml injection vials. (This shortage was last addressed in January 2010.)

» Read more

405 Freeway Closure Planned July 16-17 Weekend

Expect Heavy Traffic Delays Near 10-Mile Construction Zone

A 10-mile stretch of Interstate 405 between U.S. Highway 101 and Interstate 10 will be closed the weekend of July 16-17 as crews demolish and start reconstruction on the Mulholland Drive Bridge. Medical staff members who use this portion of the freeway or surrounding streets are strongly being encouraged to plan alternate routes in advance of this weekend.

» Read more

Imaging Case of the Month for June

Make Your Diagnosis

History:
A 29-year-old female presents with frequent headaches and found to have a horizontal jerk nystagmuson physical examination. MRI of the brain was ordered.


» Read more

4 South Closure for HEPA Filter Project

As previously communicated, we are closing 4 South in July for approximately two weeks so that we can upgrade the HVAC system and enhance the environmental controls in 4SW. We will do everything possible to minimize any disruption to patient care during this planned renovation.

Beginning Friday, June 24, we will stop admitting patients to 4S and 5SW, and we will begin transitioning 16 current 4 South East and West patients to 5SW.

On Friday, July 1, we will transition BMT patients to available 5SW beds. Patients who are receiving chemotherapy will be moved to available beds on 3SW. A total of eight (8) beds will be dedicated to chemo/onco patients who are usually admitted to 4 South. All scheduled transplant patients will be admitted to 5SW.

On Saturday, July 2, 4 South will close for renovation as we clean all of the air ducts and install new HEPA filters in all 4South patient rooms. All remaining 4 South patients will be placed throughout the Med-Surg units as appropriate. Nursing staff will be re-assigned to alternate Med-Surg units. BMT and chemotherapy certified nurses will provide care for BMT and chemotherapy patients on 5SW and 3SW.

We will re-open 4 South on Monday, July 18. At that time, we will transition existing BMT and chemotherapy patients on 5SW and 3 South patients back to 4 South.

If you have any questions regarding your patients or this renovation, please contact Peachy Hain at 310-423-6747 or via e-mail at peachy.hain@cshs.org

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and assistance.

 

Linda Burnes Bolton, Dr.PH, R.N., FAAN
Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer 

Dr. Glenn Braunstein, M.D.
Chair, Department of Medicine

Save Your Spot at Sand N' Snore

It's not too early to dig out the tent and camping gear for this year's Sand N' Snore. The dinner, sleepover and breakfast starts Friday, July 15, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. Those who don't want to sleep on the sand are welcome to enjoy dinner and the evening with colleagues and their families.

Please reserve your tickets by Tuesday, July 5, by calling (310) 423-2681.

There's a limit of one tent per physician. Tickets for the whole event are $60 per adult and $40 for each child 12 and younger. Tickets for Friday's dinner only are $45 per adult and $20 for each child 12 and younger.

Dr. Joanne Low and her son set up their tent.

Dr. Ali Salim and family.

Q&A with the New Chair of OB/GYN

Sarah J. Kilpatrick, M.D., Ph.D., a nationally renowned expert in maternal-fetal medicine and women's health, is the newly appointed chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Kilpatrick was recruited from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she was the head of OB/GYN and vice dean for the College of Medicine. She led major clinical, research, academic, and administrative initiatives, focusing on those that brought together different medical specialties with other health science disciplines.

Q: You have a very expansive approach and outlook on women's health. What are the advantages of combining OB/GYN with other specialties in a multidisciplinary setting?

A: The biggest advantage is that people don't think of their health as compartmentalized. Traditionally in medicine, we are all in our respective silos, but patients want a smooth transition of care throughout their lifetimes. Women start with a gynecologist, who's then often their obstetrician. Before age 40, they don't really seek much healthcare unless they're pregnant or need contraception. As they get older, it's nice if they can transition to other practices where the doctors already understand women's health and how it differs from men's. Essentially, it takes communication and integration with other departments, as well as a willingness to work together to best serve women patients and translate appropriate medical knowledge to them. The idea that there needs to be more focus on multidisciplinary teams is somewhat of a new concept in medicine in general. Cedars-Sinai is an ideal place for such a model.

Q: What challenges and opportunities have you identified in your first 30 days at Cedars-Sinai?

A: Cedars-Sinai is a big place filled with many intelligent, energetic people. The leadership is committed to retaining and attracting individuals who are interested in academic medicine and have an intellectual curiosity that ultimately brings the best care to patients. I think that's very inspiring. Cedars-Sinai has one of the top maternity delivery services in Southern California. Because of its size, its insistence on excellence at the academic level, and its financial stability compared to many other state institutions right now, Cedars-Sinai is in a unique position to reach a tremendous number of patients. As new discoveries are made at Cedars-Sinai, as well as nationally and internationally, novel treatments can be funneled to patients more quickly. And the types of patients we take care of here are quite varied — they represent the entire socioeconomic and cultural spectrum — and that's another very appealing aspect of this institution.

Q: Are there any areas in OB/GYN that need attention?

A: One area that I think needs more attention is family planning — the full spectrum of family planning, starting with contraceptive services. There are many recent developments in contraception, including new types of IUDs and implantable contraceptive agents. Making contraception available is a very important part of women's health, as is making sure women have the ability to choose what method they want to use.

Q: Will you see patients at Cedars-Sinai?

A: I'm a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, so I will see high-risk OB patients. My particular interest is the medical complications that can arise during pregnancy, including diabetes, thyroid disease, and hypertensive diseases. I like to remind people that pregnancy is also about the mother's health. As obstetricians, we take care of two patients. We constantly balance the mother's health with the well-being of the fetus. Women are willing to give up a lot to save their babies, so we have to be very careful about how we counsel women about decisions they may have to make. Also, health problems such as diabetes and hypertension can develop when women are pregnant.

Women who become diabetic during pregnancy have a 50 to 70 percent chance of becoming diabetic later in their lives, and the fact that we can actively identify the problem when they're pregnant means we can actually intervene.

After pregnancy, when the gestational diabetes goes away, we can counsel women about appropriate diet and exercise to help prevent later development of type 2 diabetes. Women who develop hypertension during pregnancy are also more likely to develop chronic hypertension later on. And the same might be true for thyroid disease.

Q: What is your research agenda?

A: My research is in the area of maternal mortality and maternal severe morbidity, which means severe illness in pregnant women, and looking at the issue of preventability. Unfortunately, in the United States, maternal mortality is increasing. That's a hot topic right now nationally, in part because of the data on California, where maternal mortality has increased over the past 10 years. The interventions are relatively simple — re-education and ongoing training for every professional providing obstetric services, including residents, nurses, attending physicians and anesthesiologists.

Q: What other issues do you see in research relating to women's health?

A: Historically, women's health has been very under-funded nationally. Funding has usually gone to disease-specific areas, and disease-specific areas typically have been studied with a focus on male subjects. Cardiovascular disease is the perfect example. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development — one of the largest of the National Institutes of Health and the one that funds research on women's health — does not even include the word women in its name.

Q: What do you hope to accomplish in your first five years?

A: I would like to have obtained some major funding for a multidisciplinary-interdisciplinary mentoring program for women's health. I would like for Cedars-Sinai's OB/GYN program to have a stronger national reputation. Finally, I would like to really strengthen translational research, clinical outcomes, and the health services research arm of the Department.


This article originally appeared in the summer issue of Discoveries magazine. The interactive edition of Discoveries has exclusive videos and stories on the latest cutting-edge science, patient care and education advances at Cedars-Sinai. Visit discoveriesmagazine.org.

To request copies of the magazine, please e-mail Amanda.Busick@cshs.org

Hotline Answers Clinicians' Computer Questions

A special hotline has been set up to help clinicians with all their CS-Link and Web/VS questions. For immediate assistance, you can dial ext. 3-6428, option 3.

A dedicated physician line is available at ext. 3-2828.

Support is available 24/7.

If you'd prefer to have your question answered by e-mail, you can reach staff members at cshelp@cshs.org ("CSHelp" in Outlook).

Clinician Support Hotline (PDF)

Prochlorperazine 10mg/2ml Injection Vial Shortage

Pharmacy Focus

Please note that there is once again an acute shortage of prochlorperazine (Compazine®) 10mg/2ml injection vials. (This shortage was last addressed in January 2010.)

Our current supply of this medication is critically low and the sole drug manufacturer cannot provide us with a release date at this time. Therefore, on May 27, the following P&T-approved automatic substitution for all new prochlorperazine injection orders was re-implemented:

  • Medication Order: Prochlorperazine inj. 5 or 10mg
  • Automatic Substitution: Ondansetron (Zofran®) 4mg IV, same frequency

405 Freeway Closure Planned July 16-17 Weekend

Expect Heavy Traffic Delays Near 10-Mile Construction Zone

A 10-mile stretch of Interstate 405 between U.S. Highway 101 and Interstate 10 will be closed the weekend of July 16-17 as crews demolish and start reconstruction on the Mulholland Drive Bridge.

Medical staff members who use this portion of the freeway or surrounding streets are strongly being encouraged to plan alternate routes in advance of this weekend.

The northbound 405 Freeway will be closed between Interstate 10 and U.S. 101; the southbound 405 Freeway will be closed between U.S. 101 and the Getty Center Drive ramps. Caltrans plans to begin shutting down ramps along the 10-mile stretch starting at 7 p.m. on Friday, July 15.

Lane closures will begin at 10 p.m. Friday and continue until 5 a.m. Monday, July 18. Ramps and connectors are scheduled to reopen at 6 a.m. Monday, July 18.

To reduce the effect on traffic, the Mulholland Bridge demolition and reconstruction is planned for two phases, traffic officials said. This closure is part of Phase I, when the south side of the bridge will be demolished,followed by 11 months of reconstruction. Phase II, which is anticipated to begin a year from now, will encompass demolition of the north side of the bridge. Additional freeway closures will be required for the second phase.

For additional alternate route information, please visit www.metro.net/405.

You can also follow the project on Twitter @I_405 http://twitter.com/#!/i_405 and Facebook at www.facebook.com/405project.

Imaging Case of the Month for June

Make Your Diagnosis

Submitted by Louis Muscarella, M.D., and Marcel Maya, M.D.

History: A 29-year-old female presents with frequent headaches and found to have a horizontal jerk nystagmuson physical examination. MRI of the brain was ordered.

What’s your diagnosis?

  1. Chiari I
  2. Chiari II
  3. Chiari III
  4. Dandy Walker Malformation

Click here to access the Imaging Case of the Month site and continue with your diagnosis.

We welcome your feedback. Please send your questions and comments to Marcel Maya, M.D., at marcel.maya@cshs.org.