Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF May 27, 2011 Issue | Archived Issues

Multivitamin, Multi-Trace Metals Injection Shortage Resolved

Pharmacy Focus

Please note that the Pharmacy Department has been able to secure a sufficient amount of both Infuvite Adult Injectable MVIs (this formulation contains small amounts of Vitamin K-150mcg/10ml) and Adult Multi-Trace Metals (MTE-4). Therefore, these shortages are considered to be resolved at this time.  

» Read more


How Do White Blood Cells Detect Invaders to Destroy?

Research Corner

Scientists are one step closer to understanding how our bodies fight disease thanks to a discovery made at Cedars-Sinai. Researchers here found how a receptor on the surface of white blood cells can tell when invading fungi pose an immediate infectious threat. The discovery provides insight into how the body's immune system saves energy by not wasting its "ammo" on invaders that aren't as serious.

» Read more


IRB Announces Analyst Designations by Division

The Office of Research Compliance and Quality Improvement has changed its process for distributing the workload among the IRB analysts.

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Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming Grand Rounds.

Mandatory Flu Vaccination, CS-Link Training Discussed at Open Forum

Next Forum Set for June 2

Two dozen early risers gathered on Tuesday morning to discuss three controversial proposals that the Medical Executive Committee may soon consider: eight hours of required training for CS-Link™; mandatory flu vaccination; and a plan to manage parking in the South Mezzanine doctors’ lot.

» Read more

Bringing CS-Link to Your Private Office

Cedars-Sinai will be providing all physicians on the medical staff the option of using the CS-Link™ electronic medical record software in their private practices.

» Read more

Leadership Development Class Graduates

Congratulations to the Class of 2010-11 on their recent graduation from the Medical Staff Leadership Development Program. The program, co-chaired by William Brien, M.D., and Gil Melmed, M.D., is a 10-month course designed to provide potential medical staff leaders an overview of healthcare management concepts and practices.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai E-mail System Change

EIS is upgrading e-mail system servers to Exchange Server 2010 as part of an ongoing effort to provide Cedars-Sinai staff with improved and reliable e-mail services.

» Read more

Housestaff Takes the Win

The Housestaff Blues outscored the Attending Staff Gomers 40-36 in this year’s basketball game sponsored by the Cedars-Sinai Alumni Association and Community Health and Education.



» Read more

Unit Changes, Renovations and Closures

The first of multiple unit changes, renovations and temporary closures were initiated earlier this month and will continue over the next 90 days.

» Read more

Patient Satisfaction Is a Crucial Part of Quality Care

President's Perspective

Providing quality patient care is our top priority at Cedars-Sinai, and we measure how we are doing in a variety of ways: adherence to core measures such as "door-to-balloon" time for heart attack patients, incidence of hospital-acquired infections, and unplanned readmissions, to name just a few.

» Read more

AHSP Tops Out

With Final Steel Beam in Place, Building Enclosure Begins

The Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion topped out on May 11 with the placement of the final structural beam. With the structural steel completed, construction of the 11-story building's energy-efficient, double glass-walled exterior has begun and is expected to be completed a year from now. The Pavilion is set to open in summer 2013.

» Read more

Generous Gift to Name AHSP Lobby

When the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion opens in 2013, its lobby will be named after businessman George W. Schaeffer, whose recent gift signifies major philanthropic support for the new building.


» Read more

CNO Marks 40 Years at Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai celebrated four decades of dedicated service by its chief nursing officer on May 13, capping off several weeks of honors for Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN. Hundreds attended the 40th anniversary party in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

Mandatory Flu Vaccination, CS-Link Training Discussed at Open Forum

Next Forum Set for June 2

Two dozen early risers gathered on Tuesday morning to discuss three controversial proposals that the Medical Executive Committee may soon consider:

  • eight hours of required training for CS-Link™;
  • mandatory flu vaccination;
  • a plan to manage parking in the South Mezzanine doctors’ lot.

Mandatory flu vaccination was hotly debated. Some argued that requiring the vaccine would better protect patients, visitors and staff from acquiring and spreading influenza. On the other hand, there were questions regarding the vaccine’s efficacy and whether or not it was legal to even make such a requirement. The American Hospital Association and the American Nurses Association apparently back hospital mandates whereas the California Nurses Association opposes such a mandate.

There were also a number of questions about required training for CS-Link. The proposal, under consideration by MEC, includes eight hours that will be required - broken into two four-hour sessions. The first four hours would be instructor-led. The second session, similar to a lab setting, would be self-paced.

Physician parking was the final topic. The new proposal mandates that Medical Staff who park for more than five hours – between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. – on 10 or more weekdays a month, would lose access to the South Mezzanine lot for 30 days. They would still have access to other parking lots. Although written feedback has been split, only two questions were raised at the open forum:

  1. Why does it cost so much to park in the Medical Office Towers?
  2. Why isn’t there bicycle parking for physicians who want to ride to work?

For those who still have questions, a second open forum will be held on Thursday, June 2, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Harvey Morse Auditorium. Snacks will be provided.

You can also e-mail chieffstaff@cshs.org if you’d like to share your opinions outside of the open forums.

Bringing CS-Link to Your Private Office

Cedars-Sinai will be providing all physicians on the medical staff the option of using the CS-Link™ electronic medical record software in their private practices.

Click on the link below to download a PDF with more information and an application to participate. Several demonstrations are also planned where physicians can see what’s offered and ask questions.

Recently enacted federal regulations permit hospitals to subsidize the cost of installing electronic health record systems in the offices of private practitioners if certain conditions are met. As a result, Cedars-Sinai can offer CS-Link on a significantly discounted basis for use in medical staff physicians' private offices.

Demonstrations will be held:

  • Tuesday, May 31, 5-7 p.m., ECC-B
  • Tuesday, June 21, 5-7 p.m., CCR-B
  • Tuesday, June 28, 7-9 a.m., CCR-A
  • Tuesday, July 5, 5-7 p.m. CCR-B
  • Tuesday, July 12, 5-7 p.m., CCR-B
  • Tuesday, Aug. 2, 5-7 p.m., CCR-B
  • Tuesday, Aug. 16, 5-7 p.m., CCR-B

CS-Link Physician Private Practice FAQ and Application (PDF)

For more information, please contact Mary Zettell at (323) 866-2959 or mary.zettell@cshs.org, or Tess Settergren at (323) 866-2948 or tess.settergren@cshs.org.

Leadership Development Class Graduates

Congratulations to the Class of 2010-11 on their recent graduation from the Medical Staff Leadership Development Program. The program, co-chaired by William Brien, M.D., and Gil Melmed, M.D., is a 10-month course designed to provide potential medical staff leaders an overview of healthcare management concepts and practices.

The course is structured, interactive and engaging, providing participants with the tools and experience necessary to become an effective medical staff leader. Participants were nominated by department chairs and members of the Medical Executive Committee.

The group participated in an off-site weekend retreat on "Leadership: Bridging Priorities and Interests to Achieve Common Goals." Members of executive management and medical staff leaders addressed the group on topics including team building and leadership skills.

Other reports included an update on Cedars-Sinai Medicine, centers of excellence, quality improvement, MD-RN Collaborative efforts, medical-legal issues and medical staff credentialing. As a culminating activity, participants completed a performance improvement project applying practical tools learned.

First row (L-R): Glenn Tan, M.D., Nancy Goldman, M.D., Shahram Sepehri, M.D., Taizoon Yusufali, M.D., Jonathon Solnik, M.D., and Gene Liu, M.D. Second row (L-R): Philip Bretsky, M.D., Leo Treyzon, M.D., Ilan Kedan, M.D., Eve Newhart, M.D., Gil Melmed, M.D., program co-chair, Andrew Li, M.D., Shervin Rabizadeh, M.D., and Heather Jones, M.D.

Not pictured: William Brien, M.D., program co-chair, Frank Acosta, M.D., Christopher Chang, M.D., Lee Coleman, M.D., Deepti Dhall, M.D., Jae Lee, M.D., Monica Lee, M.D., Amin Mirhadi, M.D., Rajeev Rao, M.D., Nirupa Reddy, M.D., Jessica Schneider, M.D., Anna Solt, M.D., Harmik Soukiasian, M.D., Susan Stone, M.D., and Michael Tahery, M.D.

Cedars-Sinai E-mail System Change

EIS is upgrading e-mail system servers to Exchange Server 2010 as part of an ongoing effort to provide Cedars-Sinai staff with improved and reliable e-mail services.

What is changing?
On June 1, as the first step of transitioning to Exchange 2010, the look and feel of the Outlook Web Access (OWA) log-on page will change.

Why are we doing this?
We are taking steps to ensure that you have a seamless OWA and mobile device experience once your mailbox has been moved to Exchange 2010. As part of this seamless experience, the log-on page has to be moved to Exchange 2010.

What does it mean for you?
The only thing that is changing is the look and feel of the OWA log-on page. The look and feel of the inbox, folders, messages, etc. will remain exactly as it is today.

I can no longer receive e-mail on my phone, what do I do?
Every effort has been made to ensure a smooth event with minimal disruption. However, as an added precaution there will be support staff stationed at North and South Mezzanine Parking Lot lobbies, and Plaza Level near the bridge leading to the Medical Office Towers during the day on Friday, June 3, and Saturday, June 4, to assist you. You can still obtain assistance after hours by e-mailing the HelpdeskEIS@cshs.org or calling (310) 423-6428. Only phones using ActiveSync (Cedars-Sinai issued iPhones/iPads) have any potential for being affected by this change event. Blackberrys will not be impacted.

Is my mailbox being moved to Exchange 2010?
No, this change of the OWA log-on page is a separate step, and your mailbox is not being moved to Exchange 2010 at this time. As your individual mailbox is scheduled to be moved to Exchange 2010, we will reach out to you individually with additional information. For now, the only thing that is changing is the look and feel of OWA log-on page.

What will the log-on page look like?
The before and after comparison of the log-on page is below:

Before:

After:

What if I have additional questions?
If you have any additional questions, please e-mail the HelpdeskEIS@cshs.org or call (310) 423-6428.

Housestaff Takes the Win

The Housestaff Blues outscored the Attending Staff Gomers 40-36 in this year’s basketball game sponsored by the Cedars-Sinai Alumni Association and Community Health and Education.

In addition to basketball, attendees were treated to a cookout and the Laker Girls were on hand for photos and autographs.

Playing for the Blues were: Robert Basseri, M.D., Candice Daneshvar, M.D., Ankit Shah, M.D., Jonathan Helali, M.D., Doniel Drazin, M.D., Fred Lai, M.D., Jonathan Wiebe, M.D., Jason Dugan, M.D., Michael Schmidt, M.D., Brian Huang, M.D., Pouyan Famini, M.D., Benjamin Basseri, M.D., Vamsi Krishna, M.D., Sherwin Dela Cruz, M.D. They were coached by Daniel Daneshvar, M.D.

Playing for the Gomers were: Neil Paige, M.D., Richard Kettler, M.D., Anthony Pickett, M.D., Mark Choi, M.D., Patrick Johnson, M.D., Elad Yaron, M.D., Greg Orshansky, M.D., Gil Melmed, M.D., Scott Leeds, M.D., Calvin Johnson, M.D., Paul Barkopoulos, M.D., Anish Desai, M.D., Rab Razzak, M.D., Jerome Wang, M.D., Paul Shekelle, M.D., Ali Towfigh, M.D., Mark Bamberger, M.D., Itai Danovitch, M.D., Rady Rahban, M.D., David Fermelia, M.D., Afshin Afrashteh, M.D. They were coached by Dr. Orshansky.

Housestaff Blues

Attending Staff Gomers

Coordinating the event were: Yzhar Charuzi, M.D., president, Cedars-Sinai Alumni Association; Logan M. Williams, associate director, Community Health & Education; Mark Noah, M.D., medical director of Graduate Medical Education; Rab Razzak, M.D., Greg Orshansky, M.D., Alumni Association board member; Ramprasad Dandillaya, M.D., Alumni Association treasurer; Dorothy Lowe, M.D., Alumni Association secretary; David Fermelia, M.D., Alumni Association board member; Kevin Ollington, M.D., chief resident; Angel Harmon, MAII, Community Health & Education; Fredia Morris, MAIII, Community Health & Education

 

Photos by Thomas Neerken

Unit Changes, Renovations and Closures

The first of multiple unit changes, renovations and temporary closures were initiated earlier this month and will continue over the next 90 days.

The 4 Saperstein North 12-bed unit closed on Friday, May 13. That unit reopened on Monday, May 23, and the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit relocated from 6 Saperstein to 4 Saperstein North.

Transition meetings are being held or in the planning stage for the following changes:

  • The Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit expanded effective May 23 to both sides of CSICU to provide accommodation for our increased heart transplant, ventricular assist device, lung transplant and cardiac surgery volume.
  • Admissions to 4 Saperstein South will cease effective June 10. We will relocate the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit currently on the 6th floor Pro Tower north to 4 Saperstein South on June 20.
  • Admissions to 4 Southeast and 4 Southwest will cease effective June 24. The two units will undergo revisions to accommodate the increased volume of patients requiring negative pressure rooms including stem cell and bone marrow transplant patients. We anticipate reopening the unit on July 15, 2011.
  • To accommodate the volume of neurology and neurosurgery intensive care, we will continue to use six beds on 8 Saperstein North as needed.
  • The labor and delivery unit renovation will begin in late June. To accommodate the ongoing obstetrical volume during the Labor and Delivery Unit renovations, and the renovations occurring on 3rd floor postpartum, we will limit 3SE medical admissions to eight beds. The eight beds will be appended to 3SW allowing the unit to care for 40 patients. The expanded obstetrical bed capacity on 3SE from 12 to 20 enables us to meet our patient needs during renovation.
  • It is our intent to open the Central Cardiac Monitoring Center in July 2011. The center will house equipment and personnel to monitor all telemetry and step-down patients across the organization in one area including cardiac, medical and surgical units.

If you have questions or require additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Linda Burnes Bolton's office.

Phone and fax numbers for the units will be as follows:

On Monday, May 23, when the CICU moved from 6 Saperstein to 4 North Saperstein, that unit began using the existing phone numbers for 4N SCCT:

  • Phone: ext. 3-4638
  • Fax: ext. 3-4005

On Monday, June 20, when the PICU moves to 4 South Saperstein, that unit will be utilizing the existing phone numbers for 4S SCCT:

  • Phone: ext. 3-4060
  • Fax: ext. 3-4952

Patient Satisfaction Is a Crucial Part of Quality Care

May 2011

Thomas M. Priselac
President and CEO

Providing quality patient care is our top priority at Cedars-Sinai, and we measure how we are doing in a variety of ways: adherence to core measures such as "door-to-balloon" time for heart attack patients, incidence of hospital-acquired infections, and unplanned readmissions, to name just a few. An equally important measure of the quality of our patient care is determined by how our patients feel about the service they received from us before, during and after their hospital stay. Were all of their questions answered? Did we introduce ourselves upon entering their room? Did the patient feel that their room was clean and well-kept? Did they feel that they fully understood their discharge instructions?

While Cedars-Sinai is usually at or near the top of the list of the nation's hospitals in measures of clinical quality outcomes, we have not yet reached the same level of excellence in measures of patient satisfaction. Our efforts to boost patient satisfaction scores grow out of Cedars-Sinai's longstanding commitment to doing what's best for our patients. This has always been at the core of our mission, and always will be.

Currently, about 84 percent of our patients say they would always recommend Cedars-Sinai to friends and family, and about 76 percent give the care they received here the highest ratings. This is good — but at Cedars-Sinai we can, and should, do better than this. While these numbers have improved in each of the last four years, we haven't yet distinguished ourselves in patient satisfaction the way we do in other measures of clinical quality.

In this era of healthcare reform and greater accountability for quality care, hospitals across the nation are exploring new strategies for measuring and increasing patient satisfaction. New payment models based on value place greater emphasis on meeting quality and patient satisfaction goals, and federal Medicare reimbursements to hospitals will increasingly be tied to performance. But these financial considerations are not the primary drivers of our focus on patient satisfaction. We want to improve service to patients, first and foremost, because it is the right thing to do.

One of Cedars-Sinai's greatest strengths is the dedication of all of our staff to providing a safe, supportive healing environment that reflects best practices — at every touchpoint. Whether patients or family members are interacting with the financial services staff, nurses, physicians, nutrition staff, environmental services, pharmacists, or anyone else who is part of their hospital experience, they should always feel that we are focused on providing the highest quality service as well as the highest quality of clinical outcomes. Everyone who works here, regardless of whether you have direct contact with patients, shares responsibility for achieving the highest level of patient satisfaction.

This responsibility starts with strong support from the hospital's leadership. We're committed to ensuring that staff levels and other resources are in place to enable you to do your best work, to take pride in working for an organization that invests in quality — and to be fully engaged in our efforts to improve patient satisfaction. We value your ideas and welcome your suggestions on how to accomplish our goals, and we will recognize outstanding efforts that lead to greater patient satisfaction.

We are determined to improve service at every step of the healthcare process. Even before patients are admitted, they begin to form impressions about the Medical Center based on how they're treated during the pre-registration process — whether staff members take time to answer their questions, show sensitivity to their concerns and make the process as quick and easy as possible, for example.

During their hospital stay, patients need to know that we're concerned about their emotional well-being as well as their medical condition. They count on receiving the best care, but it may be a simple gesture that makes the biggest impression — taking the time to reassure a worried family member, holding an anxious patient's hand, anticipating a need before they ask. How often we check on patients, how quickly we respond when they need help, whether we treat them with respect and compassion at all times — this is all part of providing the quality experience that results in high levels of patient satisfaction.

We also need to let patients know that our concern doesn't stop when they leave the hospital. Our nurses now make an average of 3,500 calls a month — to patients who received outpatient care as well as those admitted to the hospital — to check on how they're doing and find out if they have any questions about their medications and discharge instructions. Good responsive communication performed consistently is at the core of our efforts to increase patient satisfaction. While the hospital environment is a familiar workplace to us, this can be a foreign and scary place to our patients. At a time when they're extremely vulnerable, they find themselves among strangers in a world of medical technology and terminology that can be overwhelming. It's up to all of us to help patients feel at ease by providing a personal touch whenever possible. The best communication makes them feel they are being seen as individuals and gives them confidence that they'll be kept well-informed throughout their hospital stay.

Finally, how well we listen and learn from patients makes a great difference in their level of satisfaction, as well as the quality of care we're able to provide. We're making improvements in our system of identifying and correcting problems based on patients' feedback, because their perspective is very important to our ongoing efforts to improve quality and safety.

Perhaps the best way to make the patient experience at Cedars-Sinai of the highest quality is to ask ourselves how we would want to be treated during a hospital stay. The way each of us answers this question will give insights about what we can do to increase patient satisfaction at Cedars-Sinai. Just as we stand out as a national model on many measures of clinical quality, we can also be a leader in patient satisfaction — if everyone gives their best to ensure that patients receive the highest levels of service at every touchpoint.

AHSP Tops Out

With Final Steel Beam in Place, Building Enclosure Begins

The Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion topped out on May 11 with the placement of the final structural beam.

With the structural steel completed, construction of the 11-story building's energy-efficient, double glass-walled exterior has begun and is expected to be completed a year from now. The Pavilion is set to open in summer 2013 and will feature state-of-the-art research laboratories and outpatient clinics located on the lower levels, and a three-story subterranean parking lot. Pedestrian bridges on the fifth floor and on the Plaza Level will connect the Pavilion to the medical center. Also included on the Plaza Level will be an Education Center, Pharmacy, Café, Imaging and Lab services.

Designed by architectural firm HOK and constructed by Hathaway Dinwiddie, the Pavilion is already garnering awards. On June 30, Cedars-Sinai, HOK and Hathaway Dinwiddie will receive the Community Impact Award and the Under Construction – Healthcare Award at the 41st Annual Los Angeles Architectural Awards, sponsored by the Los Angeles Business Council.

Generous Gift to Name AHSP Lobby

When the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion opens in 2013, its lobby will be named after businessman George W. Schaeffer, whose recent gift signifies major philanthropic support for the new building.

Schaeffer is the founder, president, and CEO of OPI Products Inc. A portion of Schaeffer's extraordinary gift comes from the George W. Schaeffer Foundation and the remainder is a bequest.

Approximately 1,900 patients, guests, and staff will enter the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion each day, and all of them will pass through the George W. Schaeffer Lobby on the plaza level. The 11-story, 440,000-square foot facility will house the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and neurosciences programs, and provide outpatient procedure suites, diagnostic imaging facilities and other clinical services. The pavilion's research labs are designed to enable physician-scientists to bridge discoveries in the lab to patient care.

CNO Marks 40 Years at Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai celebrated four decades of dedicated service by its chief nursing officer on May 13, capping off several weeks of honors for Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN.

Hundreds attended the 40th anniversary party in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

Burnes Bolton is renowned locally and nationally for her leadership and commitment to the improvement of both quality of care as well as the health of our community. In addition, she has devoted herself to improving access to healthcare and advancing the nursing practice in the United States.

Earlier this month, the UCLA School of Nursing commemorated Burnes Bolton's expansive career with the 2011 Leadership Award at the UCLA Nurse 21 Gala. The school also thanked Cedars-Sinai for its leadership gift of $20,000, which will be allocated toward the establishment of The Linda Burnes Bolton Emerging Leader Award and Scholarship with $5,000 in sponsorship of the Nurse 21 Gala. The recipient of the award will be a student who best exemplifies the leadership, drive and vision of a future leader in the nursing profession. The scholarship will be an endowed fund that provides – in perpetuity – a $5,000 scholarship to be presented each year.

The Los Angeles Business Journal also recognized Burnes Bolton with its Healthcare Executive Award in April, similarly highlighting her contributions and achievements “in helping Angelenos receive better healthcare.”

Burnes Bolton also was named among Modern Healthcare magazine's Top 25 Women in Healthcare. The biennial honor recognizes women who are making positive differences in the industry by providing leadership and mentorship. She was selected from a pool of more than 300 health care professionals from across the nation.

Burnes Bolton and Gail Grant, M.D., medical director of Resource and Outcomes Management, share a laugh at the anniversary party.

Burnes Bolton's graduation photo from the Arizona State University School of Nursing taken in May 1970.