Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Oct. 28, 2011 Issue | Archived Issues

CS-Link Physician Update

Find out need-to-know information for Cedars-Sinai's upcoming CS-Link™ implementation.

CS-Link Physician Update - Oct. 25 (PDF)


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming Grand Rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - October 2011 (PDF)


Update Your Email Address

Please contact the Medical Staff Office at credentialing@cshs.org and let us know your preferred email address.

This is particularly important if you prefer to use a third party email account (Yahoo, Gmail, AOL, etc.). This message will also be distributed by regular mail.

Melmed Honored with Pioneer in Medicine Award

Shlomo Melmed, MD, who is internationally known for his research in pituitary diseases and led Cedars-Sinai's transformation into the academic medical center it is today, received the 2011 Pioneer in Medicine award.

» Read more

Duncan Receives Chief of Staff Award

Chief Technology Officer Ray Duncan, MD, was honored with the 2011 Chief of Staff Award at this year’s Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff. Twenty years ago, Duncan created Web/VS, which will be gradually retired after the implementation of CS-Link™.

» Read more

Take the MD/RN Survey

Collaborative Seeks Input on CS-Link and Patient Safety

This year's MD/RN Collaborative Satisfaction Survey is going on now through Nov. 11. Visit www.cedars-sinai.edu/MDRNSurvey to share your opinions.

» Read more

Ten Physicians Graduate from Clinical Scholars Program

Puja Mehta, MD, wants to help stop the No. 1 killer of women – heart disease.

The Cedars-Sinai resident was one of 10 physicians who recently graduated from Cedars-Sinai's Clinical Scholars Program. During the two-year program, Mehta began researching the effects of mental stress reactivity on heart disease and subsequent death in women.

» Read more

Mind Your Manners to Minimize Harm

When personalities collide in the operating room, and it does happen on occasion, according to research by Andrew Klein, MD, director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Cedars Sinai, patients can be at risk. Klein, who recently co-authored a commentary in the Archives of Surgery titled "Barbers of Civility," strongly believes civility in healthcare is greatly needed.

» Read more

Upcoming MEC Meeting Agenda

The Medical Executive Committee will consider the following Rules and Regulations changes at its meeting on Monday, Nov. 7.

» Read more

Physician News

Waguih William IsHak, MD, was selected for the 2012 ACGME Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award.

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS, was honored with Penn State University's Eberly College of Science Outstanding Science Alumni Award.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Collaborates with Leading Research Institute on Drug Development

New Collaboration on Clinical Trials, Personalized Therapies Could Lead to more Effective Cancer Treatment

Cedars-Sinai has combined efforts with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Arizona so researchers may offer joint clinical trials and collaborate to develop personalized therapies that could lead to more effective cancer treatments.

» Read more

Stop and Smell the Roses at Their Temporary Home

The beautiful rose bushes at the northeast corner of Gracie Allen and George Burns have a temporary new home to accommodate a major landscaping project.

» Read more

Melmed Honored with Pioneer in Medicine Award

Cedars-Sinai

Shlomo Melmed, MD, who is internationally known for his research in pituitary diseases and led Cedars-Sinai's transformation into the academic medical center it is today, received the 2011 Pioneer in Medicine award.

The honor was announced at the Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff on Monday, Oct. 24.

Melmed joined Cedars-Sinai in 1980 and rose through the ranks to his current role as senior vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the Medical Faculty. He is also the Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Chair in Investigative Medicine.

"In addition to his research, he is single-handedly responsible for transforming Cedars-Sinai into an academic powerhouse," said Chief of Staff Scott Karlan, MD.

Glenn Braunstein, MD, vice president for Clinical Innovation and chair of the Department of Medicine, nominated him for the award this year. Leon Fine, MD, vice dean for Research and Graduate Research Education, previously nominated Melmed for the honor.

"He is a giant in our field with world-class stature as an expert in the pituitary and its diseases," said Braunstein, who first recruited Melmed to Cedars-Sinai. "Dr. Melmed and his laboratory colleagues have made pivotal discoveries about pituitary diseases."

Vice Chief of Staff Steven S. Galen, MD, chaired the selection committee. "His dedication to medical research and education proved that he stood out as the most deserving candidate for this award," he said.

Fellow physicians, co-workers, Cedars-Sinai leadership, community members and former patients were among those who expressed their admiration for Melmed in a special video presentation.

Cedars-Sinai

Melmed accepted the award in an overflowing Harvey Morse Auditorium on Monday.

Duncan Receives Chief of Staff Award

Chief Technology Officer Ray Duncan, MD, was honored with the 2011 Chief of Staff Award at this year's Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff.

Twenty years ago, Duncan created Web/VS, which will be gradually retired after the implementation of CS-Link™.

"We wanted to thank Ray for all the value that has come from Web/VS over the decades," said Chief of Staff Scott Karlan, MD. "His invaluable support has helped us maintain the highest standards of safe, quality patient care for which Cedars-Sinai is known."

Cedars-Sinai

Ray Duncan, MD, center, received the Chief of Staff Award.

Take the MD/RN Survey

Collaborative Seeks Input on CS-Link and Patient Safety

This year's MD/RN Collaborative Satisfaction Survey is going on now through Nov. 11. Visit www.cedars-sinai.edu/MDRNSurvey to share your opinions.

Your responses are completely confidential.

Improving physicians' work satisfaction at Cedars-Sinai is a top priority of the MD/RN Collaborative, said Chris Ng, MD, who co-chairs the Collaborative with Peachy Hain, RN.

"With the introduction of CS-Link on the inpatient units and the upcoming Physician go-live for CS-Link™ in March 2012, we are particularly interested in getting your feedback on these topics," Ng said. “The survey results are used to create tests-of-change at the unit level, so it's important that we receive your honest input.”

Please complete at least one survey for the unit where you have the most contact. For additional units, physicians are welcome to complete additional surveys.

If you have any questions, please contact either Ng at (310) 854-7840 or Chris.Ng@cshs.org or Hain at (310) 423-6747 or Peachy.Hain@cshs.org.

Ten Physicians Graduate from Clinical Scholars Program

Puja Mehta, MD, wants to help stop the No. 1 killer of women - heart disease.

The Cedars-Sinai resident was one of 10 physicians who recently graduated from Cedars-Sinai's Clinical Scholars Program. During the two-year program, Mehta began researching the effects of mental stress reactivity on heart disease and subsequent death in women.

The Cedars-Sinai program provides funding, career guidance, education and skill acquisition for aspiring clinical scientists working at the medical center. Most participants are residents in their later years of training, fellows and young members of the faculty who aspire to be clinical scientists.

This year's graduates were:

  • Amir Behdad, MD
  • Yoko Miyasaki, MD
  • Cherisse Berry, MD
  • Puja Mehta, MD (senior)
  • Ines Donangelo, MD
  • Joshua Pevnik, MD (senior)
  • Heather Jones, MD
  • Jamal Rana, MD (senior)
  • Anna Milanesi, MD
  • Chrisandra Shufelt, MD (senior)

In addition to celebrating the physicians' graduation, Jones and Shufelt each received the Eigler-Whiting-Mann Grant Award. The Clinical Scholars Program is designed to prepare scholars to compete for National Institutes of Health funding as well as other research grants.

In the first year of the program, participants study a curriculum in translational medicine and clinical research part time. The second year includes full-time research under the supervision of an experienced mentor.

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of both the Women's Heart Center the Preventive and Rehabilitative Cardiac Center, served as Mehta's mentor.

"This program provides a great opportunity for our young physicians to rapidly gain the experience they need to break new ground in research," Bairey Merz said.

Also honored were scholars who completed their first year of the program:

  • Karen Zaghiyan, MD
  • Frank Ong, MD
  • Eyal Reinstein, MD
  • Marko Bukur, MD
  • Bernice Coleman, NP
  • Silvia Kurtovic, MD
  • Jane Tavyev, MD
  • William Binder, MD
  • Fnu Deepinder, MD
 

Deepinder, Kurtovic and Ong each were honored with the Cedars-Sinai Clinical Scholars Grant Award.

Members of the program’s 2011 cohort were also announced:

  • Tyler Cheung, MD
  • Michael Schmidt, MD
  • Alice Chung, MD
  • Tara Sedlak, MD
  • Catherine Dang, MD
  • Heidi Shafi, MD
  • Collins Kwarteng, MD
  • Scott Short, MD
  • Alan Parsa, MD
  • Daniel Shouhed, MD
  • BJ Rimel, MD
  • Matthew Singer, MD

Cedars-Sinai

Puja Mehta, MD, at right, receives her graduation certificate.

Cedars-Sinai

Yoko Miyasaki, MD, at right, was among this year’s graduates.

Cedars-Sinai

Jane Tavyev Asher, MD, at right, was honored for completing the first year of the program.

Mind Your Manners to Minimize Harm

Operating rooms are typically cold and uninviting on their own. Now add the stress of an emergency and a team of men and women camouflaged by caps, masks and scrubs who are unfamiliar with each other. That doesn't leave much room for civility, and when that leaves, the dangers for patients could escalate.

Cedars-SinaiWhen personalities collide in the operating room, and it does happen on occasion, according to research by Andrew Klein, MD, director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center at Cedars Sinai, patients can be at risk. Klein, who recently co-authored a commentary in the Archives of Surgery titled "Barbers of Civility," strongly believes civility in healthcare is greatly needed.

"When people realize what the potential is here, that it doesn't cost anything, and is the least expensive way to improve health care costs, they will catch on," Klein said. "I don't see a down side to it."

Klein co-authored the article with his colleague Pier M. Forni, co-founder of the Civility Institute at Johns Hopkins University, which assesses the significance of civility, manners and politeness in contemporary society.

In the commentary, Klein suggests civility often takes a back seat to self-interest, stress, anxiety, unhappiness and the desire for power and control. What's often left in the healthcare setting is rudeness, or disruptive behavior. In some instances, individuals have become violent, Klein said.

One of the studies Klein used to support his argument was a survey of 50 hospitals and more than 1,500 nurses and physicians. In that survey, 86 percent of the nurses said they had witnessed disruptive behavior by physicians, whereas 47 percent of the physicians made the same claim against nurses.

Studies also showed that young doctors are learning to be uncivil early in their career. According to data that Klein cites in his commentary, of 1,500 medical students evaluated at 16 U.S. medical schools, 42 percent claimed to have been harassed and 84 percent thought they had been belittled. The perpetrators were residents, fellows and clinical professors.

"Do you know the damage I could cause if I overreacted in the operating room? That action could linger throughout the entire case, and bring down the entire team," Klein said. "That negative reaction has the potential to cause harm to the patient."

Klein has introduced several concepts medical institutions could deploy to better civility.
Among them, he suggests that administrators should implement character criteria in the recruitment of staff, trainees and faculty. Hospitals, in particular, traditionally hire on the basis of accomplishment, knowledge, training and productivity. However, he said what should be taken into account is an individual's social skills as well as their productivity and technical abilities.

"There are many talented people out there who are civil," Klein said. "We should not be seduced by the wealth of talent, those who have accomplished a lot, but lack situational and personal awareness."

Klein also suggests surgical leadership provide model behavior for the team.

"We have an opportunity to improve," Klein said. "We work in stressful environments where things can invariably go wrong. Part of the reason we don't solve the problem better is because we are driven apart by our lack of civility and, adding to that is the fact we sometimes don't actually know the people we are working with."

In his own practice, Klein said staff has set up pot-luck lunches and after-hours gatherings as means of introduction. In the near future, Klein hopes to launch an Intranet site that would allow each of his staff members an opportunity to post a picture and other information about themselves.

"Familiarity allows you to fill the well of good will so that when things go wrong you are much more likely to react with understanding," he said.

Only a small percentage of people have this critical civility flaw, Klein said, but there's a large percentage of people who, if they thought about it, could improve their behavior.

Upcoming MEC Meeting Agenda

The Medical Executive Committee will consider the following Rules and Regulations changes at its meeting on Monday, Nov. 7.

Item #1: Reapplication Revision

Currently, the medical staff office mails a reappointment application to you six months before your term expires, and you have 45 days to return it. If you’re late, you must pay a $400 late fee and you’re then classified as a "reapplicant" (even though you’re still on the medical staff for several months).We’ll accept your application at any time, however, depending on when you return it, you may lose privileges and medical staff membership (until your application is processed and voted on by the MEC).

The new process gives you 60 days to return the application.If you’re late, you still must pay a $400 late fee, but nothing else happens.All the rules referring to reapplicants will be gone. As is true now, if you don't turn in your reappointment application by the time of your lapse date, your membership and privileges will be automatically terminated, after which you will need to submit a new application.The medical staff office will send out two courtesy reminders by email.

Reapplication Revision (PDF)

Item #2: Changes to Proctoring

According to current Rules, provisional members of the medical staff are supposed to get 12 months to complete their Cluster 1 proctoring. Unfortunately, the way the rules currently read, the MEC must vote by the end of the 12th month, so we have been asking provisional members to submit everything within 10 months to allow time for processing and Departmental review and approval.

The new process gives provisional members 12 months to complete and submit their Cluster 1 proctoring.They then remain in the provisional category until the MEC votes.

Changes to Proctoring (PDF)

Item #3: Physician of Record

The Rules state that you must be the Physician of Record on any case used for proctoring.This clears up the definition of "Physician of Record."

Physician of Record (PDF)

Item #4: Medical Staff Members Must Check their Email

For the past six months, Health Information has been sending out delinquent medical record notices by email.

As of December 2011, the medical staff office will be sending out all credentialing-related courtesy reminders by email.

As of July 2012, the medical staff office will be sending out all communication (including your reappointment application) by email.

IMPORTANT: Please contact the Medical Staff Office at credentialing@cshs.org and let us know your preferred email address.This is particularly important if you prefer to use a third-party email account (Yahoo, Gmail, AOL, etc.). This message will also be sent out by regular mail.

Physician News

Waguih William IsHak, MD

Cedars-Sinai

Dr. IsHak, director of the Psychiatry Residency Training Program and medical director of Outpatient Psychiatry Services at Cedars-Sinai, was selected for the 2012 ACGME Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award.

This honor is given to 10 residency program directors annually from all specialties (8,887 ACGME-accredited specialty and subspecialty training programs nationwide).


Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS

Cedars-SinaiDr. Silberman, clinical chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology and the Robert J. and Suzanne Gottlieb Chair in Surgical Oncology at Cedars-Sinai, was honored with Penn State University's Eberly College of Science Outstanding Science Alumni Award.

The award recognizes alumni who have a record of significant professional achievements in their field and who are outstanding role models for the current students in the college. Among his many accomplishments, he co-edited, with his brother Howard Silberman, professor of surgery at the University of Southern California, the 2010 textbook, Principles and Practice of Surgical Oncology: Multidisciplinary Approach to Difficult Problems.

Cedars-Sinai Collaborates with Leading Research Institute on Drug Development

New Collaboration on Clinical Trials, Personalized Therapies Could Lead to more Effective Cancer Treatment

Cedars-Sinai has combined efforts with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Arizona so researchers may offer joint clinical trials and collaborate to develop personalized therapies that could lead to more effective cancer treatments.

Physician-scientists at the two institutions, as part of this collaboration, will team up for Phase 1 clinical trials of new anticancer therapies aimed at molecular targets in prostate, kidney, bladder and colorectal cancers. Research also will be conducted on drugs for the less common adrenal, neuroendocrine and thyroid cancers.

"Our two organizations share the same goal: to greatly improve cancer treatment with therapies that attack the disease in new and innovative ways," said Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD, Phase One Foundation chair and director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. "Translating new research into effective therapies will improve the lives of cancer patients, and, ultimately, lead to a time when cancer is a manageable condition, not a feared disease."

The collaborative endeavor also will study new approaches to improve patients' quality of life during cancer treatment and create innovative models to deliver supportive care and services to cancer survivors.

Cedars-Sinai has one of the largest clinical research trial facilities of any private hospital in the nation. Its outpatient cancer center treats more than 9,000 patients each year, making it one of the busiest treatment facilities in California. Earlier this year, the institute's cancer program was named as one of the top in the country by U.S. News & World Report's 2010-11 "Best Hospitals" issue.

The drug development research collaboration will be coordinated by Cedars-Sinai with Clinical Trials, a partnership with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare.

Stop and Smell the Roses at Their Temporary Home

The beautiful rose bushes at the northeast corner of Gracie Allen and George Burns have a temporary new home to accommodate a major landscaping project.

The flowers, which were donated to the medical center many years ago, have been relocated to the South Tower street level planter outside of the Blood Donor Facility.

The roses will be at this location for about a year as Cedars-Sinai begins on its Landscaping Master Plan Project, which includes improvements throughout the campus.