Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Jan. 6, 2012 Issue | Archived Issues

CS-Link Training Guidelines

CS-Link™ training begins in just 10 days (Jan. 16). If you haven’t already signed up for training, you’re in the minority. More than half of our medical staff members have already registered for training. For information about how to sign up for training, please go to www.cslinkcentral.org. In addition, we encourage you to visit this physician-specific website to complete the 10-minute e-learning modules prior to your instructor-led training.

» Read more

A New Chance for Hope

Cedars-Sinai Surgical Team Travels to China to Treat Children Abandoned for Medical Reasons

At Maria's Big House of Hope, a medical foster home in central China, 140 orphans wait for families who may never come. Available for adoption because each has a birth defect or a serious medical condition, these special-needs children struggle with the reality that their chances for adoption are slim.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Celebrates MLK Day on Jan. 16

Author-Activist Kevin Powell will be Keynote Speaker

The medical center and our medical staff will co-sponsor the 10th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration on Monday, Jan. 16, in Harvey Morse Auditorium, from noon to 1 p.m. All employees, physicians, visitors and patients are welcome to attend the event, and a limited number of free boxed lunches will be available from 11:50 a.m. to noon.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Living Kidney Donor Featured in Rose Parade

Mother Donated Kidney to Young Daughter

Gaena "Gina" Song Cho, who donated a kidney to her young daughter at Cedars-Sinai, was one of 28 donor family members, living donors and transplant recipients who took rode on Donate Life's Rose Parade float on Monday.

» Read more

Topic Suggestions Sought for the Great Debates

The Ninth Annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will be held on Thursday, April 26, at 8 a.m. in ECC A-C.

» Read more

CME Earns Accreditation with Commendation

Cedars-Sinai's Continuing Medical Education (CME) program was awarded Accreditation with Commendation in December, making it one of a small number of such programs in the U.S. to achieve this designation in three consecutive surveys.

» Read more

Dialysis Unit Re-Opens

Cedars-Sinai's newly remodeled Dialysis Unit on 6SW officially re-opened on Dec. 27 and began accepting patients, following an 18-month hiatus due to construction.



» Read more

Go Red for Women on Feb. 3

Physicians are encouraged to support women's heart health by wearing red on Friday, Feb. 3, when Cedars-Sinai will mark the sixth annual Marlene Wald Memorial Go Red Day to increase awareness of heart disease as the leading killer of women.


» Read more

CS-Link Training Guidelines

CS-Link™ training begins in just 10 days (Jan. 16). If you haven’t already signed up for training, you’re in the minority. More than half of our medical staff members have already registered for training. For information about how to sign up for training, please go to www.cslinkcentral.org. In addition, we encourage you to visit this physician-specific website to complete the 10-minute e-learning modules prior to your instructor-led training.

Following are a few ground rules you need to be aware of (and adhere to in order to be compensated) as you head into training:

  • You need to be present for the entire class.
  • Classes will start on time and end on time. Classroom doors will be locked 10 minutes after the start of class. If you do not make it to class prior to the doors being locked, you will need to reschedule for your training for another time.
  • You cannot miss more than 15 minutes in total (e.g., showing up late, leaving early, stepping out to take calls etc.).
  • Cell phones are to be set to vibrate or turned off.

We encourage you to arrange for patient care coverage during your training if possible. Each time you leave to handle a patient care issue, the entire class will be interrupted (as the instructor tries to bring you up to speed when you return).

A 15-minute break will be offered during the session so you can return phone calls, etc. Also, food and beverages will be provided, so there’s no need to bring your own, unless you have a specific need.

As a reminder, you MUST complete your CS-Link training by March 2, 2012. If you have any questions about training, please call (310) 423-2828 (option 7) or send an email to AskCSLink@cshs.org.

A New Chance for Hope

Cedars-Sinai Surgical Team Travels to China to Treat Children Abandoned for Medical Reasons

At Maria's Big House of Hope, a medical foster home in central China, 140 orphans wait for families who may never come. Available for adoption because each has a birth defect or a serious medical condition, these special-needs children struggle with the reality that their chances for adoption are slim.

It's complicated in China, where the low rate of adoption of Chinese orphans by Chinese families makes it challenging for the boys and girls at Maria's Big House of Hope to be adopted in their home country.

But for some of those children, the future became brighter as a team of doctors and nurses, most from Cedars-Sinai, arrived at the orphanage in the city of Louyang in November. Organized by Mending Kids International, a Burbank-based nonprofit, the 16-member team flew to China to perform pediatric surgeries and to teach the procedures to the local medical staff. Led by pediatric surgeon Philip Frykman, MD, PhD, the Cedars-Sinai contingent included pediatric anesthesiologist Keith Kimble, MD, as well as Janet Kimble, RN, Scott Short, MD, a surgical resident , Jennifer Ross, RN, a pediatric ICU nurse, and Claire Esguerra, LVN, a surgical technician.

"We were there to work with children with anorectal malformations, all of them abandoned within days of being born," Frykman said. The bias in China against physical deformities can sometimes lead families to believe that children who have anorectal malformations might bring bad luck to the family. (Pictured left: Dr. Kimble preps patient for anesthesia)

Children with these malformations who don't receive care soon die of sepsis or malnutrition. The lucky ones receive treatment such as a colostomy, and then go to one of China's orphanages. Adding to the gravity of the situation is the fact that specialized pediatric surgery is a rarity in China.

"The kids just accumulate because no one there knows how to do pull-through surgery on children, or if they do, the financial hurdles are too great," Frykman explained.

That all changed for a dozen or so children at Maria's Big House of Hope. Named in honor of the late Maria Sue Chapman, a Chinese orphan adopted by an American family in Tennessee, the facility is a light and bright building that is part of the New Hope Foundation, a U.S. charity. Once the Cedars-Sinai team toured the building, they helped unpack dozens of bags of medical gear and supplies, and then got to work.

Prior to arriving, Frykman conferred with the foster home's doctor, an American general practitioner, and with Dr. Zhai, a local surgeon. The trio selected the best candidates for surgery. Once there, Frykman and the team handled 11 cases in four days, including hernias, anorectal pull-through surgery, colostomy repairs and several emergencies.

"Dr. Zhai scrubbed in with me on every case, and I taught him how to do the pull-throughs," Frykman said. "He was very interested and very thankful, not just for the work we were doing, but for the training as well."

The orphanage is tucked into the strangest of spots - at the far edge of the city of more than one million, between an insane asylum and a prison. Despite a large and caring staff, the work was challenging, said Janet Kimble, RN, a CN IV at Cedars-Sinai's Maxine Dunitz Children's Health Center and a pediatric surgery specialty nurse.

Cedars-SinaiUnlike U.S. operating room tables, which can be raised and lowered, the OR table in the orphanage was fixed at a low level, Kimble said. The nurses were able to improvise ways to raise the tiny patients so the American doctors, all taller than six feet, could operate without hunching over for hours at a time.

By the time the Cedars-Sinai team left 10 days later, the fate of 11 of the tiny patients had greatly improved. Dr. Zhai, who had assisted in all of the surgeries, also had "graduated" by performing one on his own.

"We went in with three goals," said Frykman, pictured at right with the first patient of the day. "To perform high-level reconstructive pull-through surgery for these kids, to help train the local surgeon, and to establish a relationship between Mending Kids International and the facility to see what we could do in the future."

The only complication in 10 days, other than the occasional language barrier, was one minor post-op infection. Otherwise, the mission was a success.

"It was a great experience, and it reminds you of the reason you went into health care," Frykman said. "There's no bureaucracy, no dealing with health insurance. It's just the wish to heal, and the patient in front of you."

Cedars-Sinai Celebrates MLK Day on Jan. 16

The medical center and our medical staff will co-sponsor the 10th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration on Monday, Jan. 16, in Harvey Morse Auditorium, from noon to 1 p.m. All employees, physicians, visitors and patients are welcome to attend the event, and a limited number of free boxed lunches will be available from 11:50 a.m. to noon.

This year's keynote speaker is Kevin Powell, a political activist and entrepreneur who has written numerous books and has been published in Esquire, Newsweek, The Washington Post and Rolling Stone. A special musical performance by R&B singer/songwriter Goapele will conclude the program.

 

Powell most recently was a 2008 Democratic candidate for Congress in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he is a longtime resident. A native of Jersey City, N.J., he emerged from a childhood of extreme poverty, welfare, fatherlessness and a single mother-led household to become a graduate of Rutgers University. Powell first gained public attention in 1992 as an original cast member of MTV's “Real World.” He since has published 10 books, including Open Letters to America, a collection of essays that examines American leadership, politics and various social issues in the era of Barack Obama.

Goapele (pronounced gwa-puh-LAY) is a Bay area-based soul and R&B singer-songwriter whose music often highlights the need for political and socioeconomic change. As a human rights activist, she has performed at rallies, demonstrations and political events around the world, including in South Africa, where her father was born. Her name means to move forward in Setswana, a language spoken in southern Africa. Earlier this year, she released her latest album, "Break of Dawn."

Cedars-Sinai Living Kidney Donor Featured in Rose Parade

Above: Gaena "Gina" Song Cho, who donated a kidney to her young daughter at Cedars-Sinai, was among those who rode on the ninth annual Donate Life Rose Parade float. Below: Song Cho, her daughter and transplant recipient Cherity, and older daughter Chloe place a flower in the float's dedication garden.

Mother Donated Kidney to Young Daughter

Gaena "Gina" Song Cho, who donated a kidney to her young daughter at Cedars-Sinai, was one of 28 donor family members, living donors and transplant recipients who took rode on Donate Life's Rose Parade float on Monday.

Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center performed hundreds of organ transplants last year. But the Song Cho family's remarkable journey stood out when it came time to select who would represent the center on the 2012 Donate Life Rose Parade float. Click here to read more about Gaena and Cherity Song Cho.

This year's theme for the float was "… One More Day," and the design was inspired by floral clocks and clock towers around the world. Its 28 riders represented deceased organ, eye and tissue donors, living donors and transplant recipients. Six floral clocks were adorned with 72 memorial "floragraph" portraits of deceased donors.

The front of the float featured a dedication garden honoring thousands of organ, eye and tissue donors and recipients nationwide, with roses in individual vials that carried personal messages of love, hope and remembrance. Song Cho is pictured above placing a rose in the dedication garden.

Topic Suggestions Sought for the Great Debates

The Ninth Annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will be held on Thursday, April 26, at 8 a.m. in ECC A-C.

The debate committee is currently soliciting suggestions for this year’s topic. Please submit your suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, at Leo.Gordon@cshs.org.

Click here to read about last year's debate. The topic was "Industry and Medicine: Essential Partners or Unholy Alliance."

CME Earns Accreditation with Commendation

Cedars-Sinai's Continuing Medical Education (CME) program was awarded Accreditation with Commendation in December, making it one of a small number of such programs in the U.S. to achieve this designation in three consecutive surveys.

The Accreditation with Commendation was given to Cedars-Sinai by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), which is the accreditation body for CME courses. Accreditation with Commendation is a six-year accreditation.

"We are very grateful for the leadership provided to us by Dr. Shlomo Melmed, Dr. Mark Noah and Richard Katzman throughout the process, as well as for their actual participation in the survey," said Ellen W. Green, MS, director of Medical Education. "Additional recognition should be noted for our CME course and series directors, departmental CME agents, and members of our Medical Staff CME Committee. A special acknowledgement goes to Marta Betancourt, OdetTer-Martirosyan and Bernadette Moleta from the CME Office. Their work on our program and the accreditation application was invaluable."

Dialysis Unit Re-Opens

Cedars-Sinai's newly remodeled Dialysis Unit on 6SW officially re-opened on Dec. 27 and began accepting patients, following an 18-month hiatus due to construction.

As part of the remodel, the Dialysis Unit has been expanded from five to eight beds and features state-of-the-art equipment.

(l-r) Transporter David Valdivia and Felipe Santa Maria, RN, prepare to move a patient into the re-opened Dialysis Unit located on 6SW.

Go Red for Women on Feb. 3

Physicians are encouraged to support women’s heart health by wearing red on Friday, Feb. 3, when Cedars-Sinai will mark the sixth annual Marlene Wald Memorial Go Red Day to increase awareness of heart disease as the leading killer of women.

A group photo will be taken at 9 a.m., cardiac risk assessment screenings will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m., and Michelle Hamilton, MD, will speak from noon to 1 p.m.