Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Dec. 6, 2013 | Archived Issues

Recognition for Honjo, Reich, Slattery, Azizzadeh, Steiner

Physician News

Tomoyuki Honjo, MD, PhD, has received honors for his work on a vaccine to treat aortic aneurysms; Heidi Reich, MD, has won a Sports Spectacular Endowed Fellowship; William H. Slattery, MD, and Babak Azizzadeh, MD, have completed a book on the facial nerve; and Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, has been honored by the Tower Cancer Research Foundation.

» Read more


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - November 2013 (PDF)

Helping Patients With Individual Insurance Policies Understand Changes in Coverage

Some patients with individual health insurance plans (not employer- or group-provided insurance) have raised concerns about being able to stay with their doctors as changes in the health insurance marketplace are implemented. Here's how to keep them informed.

» Read more

MEC Approves New Secretary, Treasurer

The Medical Executive Committee on Dec. 2 approved two new officers for 2014: Ilana Cass, MD, as secretary and Michael Alexander, MD, as treasurer. The committee also approved a new Medical Staff Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, and noted eight new members of the medical staff.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health System and Select Medical to Create Medical Rehabilitation Hospital

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health System and Select Medical have announced a partnership to create a 138-bed acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital located in the former Century City Hospital.

» Read more

Flu Badges Being Distributed to Medical Staff

To help ensure compliance with a Los Angeles County Public Health order issued to hospitals, Cedars-Sinai has begun distributing special ID badge accessories to its employees, medical staff and volunteers, beginning with everyone who works in patient-care areas.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Viewing the Anesthesia Report

OpTime has been live for a month now. The surgeons and anesthesiologists are pros at using the new functionality. Other physicians may not have noticed anything, but there is added perk for nonsurgical types, too.

» Read more

Spend a Night at the Museum

Medical staff members and their families are invited to A Night at the Museum, a dinner and sleepover at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, on Friday, Feb. 28.
 

» Read more

FDA Lessens Restrictions on Rosiglitazone Drugs

Pharmacy Focus

Because of new data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requiring removal of the prescribing and dispensing restrictions for rosiglitazone medicines that were put in place in 2010. Also, a summary of FDA boxed warnings has been issued.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Patient Undergoes First-of-Its-Kind Stent Graft Procedure

A patient at Cedars-Sinai has become the first in the nation to undergo a less invasive type of stent graft procedure to repair an ascending aorta.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Enters Sports Medicine, Orthopedics Partnership

Cedars-Sinai has entered into a Letter of Intent with two prominent orthopedic and sports medicine physician groups — the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic and the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Group — to join them in the recently established Institute for Sports Sciences.

» Read more

Novel Study Charts Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Investigators in the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute have made extensive progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer's progression. These results may help scientists better understand the prognosis of patients diagnosed with advanced forms of the disease.

» Read more

Half of Brain Cancer Study Patients Survive 5 Years

Eight of 16 patients participating in a study of an experimental immune system therapy directed against the most aggressive malignant brain tumors — glioblastoma multiforme — survived longer than five years after diagnosis, according to Cedars-Sinai researchers.

» Read more

Helping Patients With Individual Insurance Policies Understand Changes in Coverage

Some patients with individual health insurance plans (not employer- or group-provided insurance) have raised concerns about being able to stay with their doctors as changes in the health insurance marketplace are implemented. This especially resonates with patients who have chronic or persistent conditions where treatment likely will carry over into the next calendar year.

The plan-by-plan fact sheet in the PDF link below provides a summary of changes — listed by insurance company — that relates to individual and family coverage and highlights those plans that provide full coverage for care from Cedars-Sinai and most of its physicians.

Plan-by-Plan Insurance Fact Sheet (PDF)

In the Covered California exchange, Health Net is the only insurance company offering PPO plans (Bronze, Catastrophic and Tribal) that provide full coverage for care from Cedars-Sinai and most of its physicians. Health Net also is the best option when purchasing a policy through an insurance company or agent, as Cedars-Sinai is participating in the Health Net Platinum, Gold, Silver, Bronze and Catastrophic PPO plans.

If you are a Health Net PPO-contracted physician, your patients with individual or family coverage who are not in a current plan that is eligible for grandfathering can select one of these plans and continue their care with you.

Patients who are in the middle of care and have received notice from their health insurance carrier that they need to switch plans in order to continue individual and family coverage may be able to keep their doctor or hospital for a limited time in the event you are not participating as a contracted provider in their new plan. This is called "continuity of care."

Please note that patients must initiate the request for continuity of care from their plan, and the physician and hospital must agree to keep them as a patient. When requesting continuity of care, patients must provide the name of their physician and hospital (if hospital services are needed), their current medical condition, and the treatments they are receiving. Click the PDF link below for an informational sheet on continuity of care that can be given out to your patients.

Fact Sheet on Continuity of Care (PDF)

Only patients with certain kinds of health problems/conditions can get continuity of care:

Type of Problem/Condition

How Long Continuity of Care Is Available

Acute condition (i.e., pneumonia)

As long as the condition lasts

Serious chronic condition (i.e., heart disease, diabetes)

No more than 12 months, usually until the patient completes a period of treatment and the doctor can safely transfer care to another doctor

Pregnancy

During pregnancy and immediately after the delivery (post-partum period)

Terminal illness

As long as the person lives

Care of a child under 3 years

For up to 12 months

Already-scheduled surgery/procedure (i.e., knee surgery, colonoscopy)

Surgery/procedure must be scheduled to happen within 180 days of the change in health plans.


Note: Any exceptions will be for a limited period of time.
Source:
California Department of Managed Health Care

For the most up-to-date information, please visit cedars-sinai.edu/insurance or email questions to insurance@cshs.org.

MEC Approves New Secretary, Treasurer

The Medical Executive Committee has approved the Nominating Committee’s recommendations for secretary and treasurer for 2014:

  • Secretary — Ilana Cass, MD
  • Treasurer — Michael Alexander, MD
Ilana Cass, MDMichael Alexander, MD

Christopher Ng, MD, will serve as chief of staff, and Peggy Miles, MD, will be vice chief of staff.

Also at its Dec. 2 meeting, the committee approved a new Medical Staff Privacy and Confidentiality Policy, and noted eight new members of the medical staff. For details of the policy and the names of the new medical staff members, click the PDF link below.

Morning After Report - Dec. 2 (PDF)

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health System and Select Medical to Create Medical Rehabilitation Hospital

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health System and Select Medical have announced a partnership to create a 138-bed acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital located in the former Century City Hospital. With an expected opening in late 2015, the rehabilitation hospital will serve the growing need in the community for inpatient rehabilitation, and is also expected to serve as a center for treating complex rehabilitation cases from throughout the nation.

The joint venture is an LLC (limited liability company) partnership among Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health System and Select Medical. The vision of the partnership is to develop a world-class regional rehabilitation center providing highly specialized care, advanced treatment and leading-edge technologies to treat individuals with spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, stroke, amputation, neurological disorders, and musculoskeletal and orthopedic conditions.

Currently, Cedars-Sinai and UCLA Health System provide acute inpatient rehabilitation services at their respective facilities. Both of these facilities are usually full, as capacity is limited (28 beds at Cedars-Sinai and 11 beds at UCLA Health System). When the new hospital opens, Cedars-Sinai and UCLA Health System would transition their acute inpatient rehabilitation services to the new facility.

The new facility would be operated by Select Medical, a leading provider of long-term acute care and rehabilitation, with hospital and outpatient locations in 44 states, including the renowned Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in New Jersey. It has partnered with a number of academic medical centers, including Baylor Health System and Penn State Hershey Medical Center, to manage and operate similar rehabilitation hospitals.

"This exciting project is a natural progression of Cedars-Sinai's mission, to provide the highest level of patient care while supporting medical innovation," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai. "Meeting the health needs of the community, state and nation often requires a new type of partnership, and we look forward to working with UCLA Health System and Select Medical to create a highly advanced, comprehensive rehabilitation center for patients."

Earlier this year, a feasibility study found that appropriate seismic retrofitting would enable the facility to meet seismic safety standards and all necessary licensure requirements to be operated as a rehabilitation hospital. The building's current owner has begun infrastructure and modernization work to bring the building up to standards. The preparation work will be completed in 2015, and will allow building occupancy until 2030.

Flu Badges Being Distributed to Medical Staff

To help ensure compliance with a Los Angeles County Public Health order issued to hospitals, Cedars-Sinai has begun distributing special ID badge accessories to its employees, medical staff and volunteers, beginning with everyone who works in patient-care areas. The green and orange badges indicate whether the wearer has received a flu vaccination or has chosen to wear an isolation mask instead.

For those members of the medical staff who have not already done so, please take a moment to go online and fill out your flu vaccination status (this site is for medical staff and allied health professionals only). Once you fill out the online form, Medical Staff Services will mail the appropriate badge to you, or you can pick your badge up in the Medical Staff office, Suite 2211, North Tower Plaza Level, during business hours.

Effective Dec. 1, the public health order requires all healthcare workers, including medical staff and house staff, to get the flu vaccination. If you decline vaccination, you are required to wear an isolation mask at all times while in direct contact with patients or while in areas where patient care is provided. Enforcement of Cedars-Sinai's policy, which was approved by the Medical Executive Committee, goes into effect Dec. 15 and will continue through March 31, 2014, when flu season ends. Additional information about the public health order may be found here.

Cedars-Sinai's influenza vaccination policy applies to all paid and unpaid employees, including medical staff, contractors, vendors, students and volunteers, who work in areas where patient care is provided or who have direct contact with patients. Patient-care areas are defined as including all inpatient units (including unit hallways, nursing stations and Pro Tower waiting areas), procedural rooms and ORs, lab draw stations, imaging suites, patient registration areas, and ambulatory care areas where care can be provided. The policy does not apply to entrances or lobby areas, eating areas and nonclinical office space.

CS-Link Tip: Viewing the Anesthesia Report

OpTime has been live for a month now.

The surgeons and anesthesiologists are pros at using the new functionality. Other physicians may not have noticed anything, but there is added perk for nonsurgical types, too. Now the anesthesia report is available for viewing with a single click.

Click here for more CS-Link™ training updates for physicians.

Spend a Night at the Museum

A photo from the 2013 event

Medical staff members and their families are invited to A Night at the Museum, a dinner and sleepover at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, on Friday, Feb. 28.

Eat dinner in the shadow of a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, and explore the most prolific trade route in history with a private tour through the museum's new exhibit "Traveling the Silk Road." Pack sleeping bags, blankets, pillows and air mattresses (no tents). Dinner, exhibits and entertainment are included, as is a continental breakfast.

Cost is $65 per adult and $45 per child under 12. The cost for those who don't spend the night is $50 per adult and $25 per child under 12. Parking is $10 per car.

Call Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 to reserve tickets.

See coverage of the 2013 event here.

FDA Lessens Restrictions on Rosiglitazone Drugs

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has determined that recent data for rosiglitazone-containing drugs, such as Avandia, Avandamet, Avandaryl and generics, do not show an increased risk of heart attack compared to the standard Type 2 diabetes medicines metformin and sulfonylurea. As a result, FDA is requiring removal of the prescribing and dispensing restrictions for rosiglitazone medicines that were put in place in 2010.

Also, a summary of FDA boxed warnings has been issued.

The decision on rosiglitazone medicines is based on FDA review of data from a large, long-term clinical trial and is supported by a comprehensive, expert re-evaluation of the data conducted by the Duke Clinical Research Institute.

Previous data from a large, combined analysis of mostly short-term, randomized clinical trials of rosiglitazone had suggested an elevated risk of heart attack, so the FDA required a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS), called the Rosiglitazone REMS program. The Rosiglitazone REMS program restricted the use of rosiglitazone medicines to help ensure that their benefits outweighed the risks.

Although some scientific uncertainty about the cardiovascular safety of rosiglitazone medicines remains, in light of the new re-evaluation, the FDA's concern is substantially reduced, and the rosiglitazone REMS program requirements will be modified.

Learn more at this FDA Web page.

FDA Boxed Warnings Summarized

A summary of boxed warnings from the FDA has been issued. Click the PDF link below to see the summary.

FDA Boxed Warning Summary (PDF)

Cedars-Sinai Patient Undergoes First-of-Its-Kind Stent Graft Procedure

A patient at Cedars-Sinai has become the first in the nation to undergo a less invasive type of stent graft procedure to repair an ascending aorta.

Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD

Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the standard of care for the majority of patients with descending aortic or distal aortic arch pathologies, including aneurysms, dissections, aortic ulcers, intramural hematomas and traumatic aortic injuries. All of these pathologies are now approved indications for this less invasive procedure, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Open repair, on the other hand, remains the standard of care for all diseases of the ascending aorta, such as type A aortic dissection and aortic aneurysms.

Recently, a patient of Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD, director of Thoracic Aortic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai, underwent successful stent graft repair of an ascending aortic pathology. This patient is the first in the U.S. to undergo an approved stent graft procedure as part of the FDA's investigational device exemption.

Without this less invasive procedure, the patient would have needed an extensive operation involving sternotomy and open-heart surgery with a heart-lung machine to replace the ascending aorta. Instead, he had the stent graft placed though the femoral arteries and was discharged two days later.

Patients with the following conditions may be candidates for the less-invasive TEVAR as part of this FDA pathway: aortic aneurysms, type A aortic dissections, ascending aortic ulcers, and intramural hematomas and pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta.

If you would like to know if your patients are candidates for this less invasive procedure, contact Khoynezhad at 310-423-4345 or ali.khoynezhad@cshs.org.

Cedars-Sinai Enters Sports Medicine, Orthopedics Partnership

Cedars-Sinai has entered into a Letter of Intent with two prominent orthopedic and sports medicine physician groups — the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic and the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Group — to join them in the recently established Institute for Sports Sciences. The Institute for Sports Sciences will pursue strategies for leadership in orthopedics and sports medicine regionally, nationally and internationally.

The collaboration between the renowned orthopedic physicians and staff here at Cedars-Sinai and the two other groups, which are best known for their role in the care of professional sports teams and individual elite athletes, provides the framework for clinical and research initiatives to benefit patients, and expands the geographic footprint of each of the partners, enhancing the community's access to high-quality orthopedics and sports medicine.

While the Institute for Sports Sciences is the vehicle for collaboration among the three entities, each will continue to see patients in their current locations under each of their respective brands. Plans for the Institute for Sports Sciences also include coordination of orthopedic-related research and clinical trials with Cedars-Sinai, including the advanced use of orthobiologics (including stem cells and other molecular and cellular-based experimental treatments for sports injuries), and activities related to development of new approaches to orthopedic treatments that minimize surgery whenever possible.

In addition, the Institute for Sports Sciences will have programs in pediatric sports medicine, sports neurology and concussion, a movement performance center, and a return-to-work program coordinated with employers.

"With the rapidly changing landscape in healthcare, Cedars-Sinai's high quality and reputation for innovation make us a sought-after participant in partnerships such as the Institute for Sports Sciences," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai. "As we have through the years, we will continue to engage in discussions with other organizations about different types of partnerships and other relationships that further enhance our abilities to serve the community and meet the various aspects of our mission."

The orthopedic surgeons at Cedars-Sinai are internationally known for the depth and breadth of their research and their skills in treating the full spectrum of complex orthopedic injuries, from hand surgery to trauma to joint replacement to bone tumors, and everything in between. The Institute for Sports Sciences provides an opportunity to expand Cedars-Sinai's work in sports medicine, in collaboration with the two other orthopedic groups, whose work with professional sports teams and elite athletes is well known.

The Institute for Sports Sciences was initially formed by the Kerlan-Jobe and Santa Monica Orthopaedics groups and Sovereign Healthcare, a private healthcare management company based in Southern California. In the new partnership, Kerlan-Jobe and Santa Monica Orthopaedics physicians will become part of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Care Foundation. Sovereign Healthcare, under a contract from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Care Foundation, will manage the Kerlan-Jobe and Santa Monica Orthopaedics groups and their surgery centers.

Novel Study Charts Aggressive Prostate Cancer

Many patients diagnosed with prostate cancer have indolent, slow-growing forms of the disease that are not life-threatening. However, more than 30,000 American men will die from aggressive prostate cancer this year alone. This sharp contrast between low-risk and aggressive disease presents a challenge for researchers and physicians as they diagnose patients and determine the prognosis of the men with the most aggressive forms of prostate cancer.

Investigators in the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute have made extensive progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease progression. These results may help scientists better understand the prognosis of patients diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer. The study, published in the journal Cell Cycle and led by Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD, may ultimately lead to the development of new biomarkers for not only prognosis, but also a patient's potential response to therapy.

"One of the long-standing difficulties in treating men with advanced prostate cancer has been predicting the response to given therapies or treatments," said Di Vizio, associate professor in the Department of Surgery, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Department of Biomedical Sciences. "These latest research findings provide tangible insight into the molecular and structural phenomena that result in prostate cancer metastases. They have the potential to create a new source of biomarkers and an innovative standard of care. These findings may also help distinguish individualized treatment plans best suited for each patient."

The new source of biomarkers is large oncosomes, which are vesicles released from aggressive prostate cancer cells with highly migratory features. These large oncosomes carry tumor molecules and have been shown in previous studies to contribute to tumor progression. This study demonstrates, for the first time in human samples, that identification of circulating large oncosomes can be an indicator of patients with more aggressive, treatment-resistant disease. Also, researchers found that large oncosomes contain microRNA, a molecule that regulates several biological processes now proven to influence tumor progression.

At the Cedars-Sinai Urologic Oncology Program, researchers and physicians work in close collaboration to discover personalized options for patients with indolent prostate disease as well as those with aggressive cancer. This latest study will amplify the genetic and molecular understanding of aggressive prostate cancer.

"Many of the latest research developments and treatments for urologic cancers have been initiated from Cedars-Sinai investigators and physicians," said Robert Figlin, MD, associate director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, professor of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the Steven Spielberg Family Chair in Hematology Oncology. "These latest research observations may identify novel ways to measure a patient's prognosis and are just a steppingstone for the many discoveries moving down the pipeline in our cancer institute."

Cedars-Sinai collaborators include Michael Freeman, PhD, director of Cancer Biology and Therapeutics and vice chair of Research and Surgery in the department of Biomedical Sciences; Leland Chung, PhD, director of the Urologic Oncology Research Program and professor in the Department of Medicine; Edwin Posadas, MD, co-medical director in the Urologic Oncology Program and assistant professor in the Department of Medicine; Hyung Lae Kim, MD, director of Academic Programs in the Division of Urology and co-medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program; Neil Bhowmick, PhD, research scientist and associate professor in the Department of Medicine; and fellows Matteo Morello, PhD, Valentina Minciacchi and Julie Yang.

Francesca Demichelis, PhD, from Centro for Integrative Biology at the University of Trento, Italy, contributed to the study, as did researchers from Istituto Nazionale di Genetica Molecolare and Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan and NanoSight Inc.

The research was supported by the National Cancer Institute (CA131472 [R00] to DDV, R01CA143777 to MRF) and the Steven Spielberg Discovery Fund in Prostate Cancer Research.

Half of Brain Cancer Study Patients Survive 5 Years

Eight of 16 patients participating in a study of an experimental immune system therapy directed against the most aggressive malignant brain tumors — glioblastoma multiforme — survived longer than five years after diagnosis, according to Cedars-Sinai researchers, who presented findings Nov. 23 at the Fourth Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology.

Seven of the 16 participants still are living, with length of survival ranging from 60.7 to 82.7 months after diagnosis. Six of the patients also were "progression free" for more than five years, meaning the tumors did not return or require more treatment during that time. Four participants still remain free of disease with good quality of life at lengths ranging from 65.1 to 82.7 months following diagnosis. One patient who remained free of brain cancer for five years died of leukemia.

The original clinical trial — a Phase I study designed to evaluate safety — included 16 patients with glioblastoma multiforme enrolled between May 2007 and January 2010 by researchers at Cedars-Sinai's Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. Brain Tumor Center.

Results published in January at the end of the study showed median overall survival of 38.4 months. Typically, when tumor-removal surgery is followed by standard care, which includes radiation and chemotherapy, median length of survival is about 15 months. Median progression-free survival — the time from treatment to tumor recurrence — was 16.9 months at study's end. With standard care, the median is about seven months.

The experimental treatment consists of a vaccine, ICT-107, intended to alert the immune system to the existence of cancer cells and activate a tumor-killing response. It targets six antigens involved in the development of glioblastoma cells.

According to information presented at the scientific meetings, all eight long-term survivors had tumors with at least five antigens, 75 percent had tumors with all six, and all of them had tumors with at least four antigens associated with cancer stem cells, which are cancer-originating cells that appear to enable tumors to resist radiation and chemotherapy and even regenerate after treatment.

"Our findings suggest that targeting antigens that are highly expressed by cancer stem cells may be a viable strategy for treating patients who have glioblastomas. Long-term remission of disease in this group of patients was correlated with the expression of cancer stem cell tumor-associated antigens," said Surasak Phuphanich, MD, director of the Neuro-Oncology Program at the Cochran Brain Tumor Center and professor of neurology with Cedars-Sinai's Department of Neurosurgery and Department of Neurology.

Based on results of the Phase I study, the ICT-107 vaccine entered a Phase II multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 2011.

The vaccine is based on dendritic cells, the immune system's most powerful antigen-presenting cells — those responsible for helping the immune system recognize invaders. They are derived from white blood cells taken from each participating patient in a routine blood draw. In the laboratory, the cells are cultured with synthetic peptides of the six antigens, essentially training the dendritic cells to recognize the tumor antigens as targets. When the "new" dendritic cells in the vaccine are injected under the patient's skin, they are intended to seek and destroy lingering tumor cells. Vaccine is administered three times at two-week intervals after standard radiation and chemotherapy.

Phuphanich is first author of an abstract presented at the scientific meetings' poster session.

ICT-107 is a product of the biotechnology company ImmunoCellular Therapeutics Ltd. Cedars-Sinai owns equity in the company, and certain rights in the dendritic cell vaccine technology and corresponding intellectual property have been exclusively licensed by Cedars-Sinai to ImmunoCellular Therapeutics, including rights associated with ICT-107, the vaccine investigated in this clinical study.

Several members of the research and presentation team have ties to the company. Abstract co-author Keith Black, MD, a Cedars-Sinai physician, owns stock in the company. Senior author John Yu, MD, a Cedars-Sinai physician, owns stock in the company and is its founder, chief scientific officer and chair of the board of directors. James Bender, PhD, MPH, a co-author, is Immunocellular Therapeutics' vice president for product development and manufacturing. Elma Hawkins, a co-author, also is identified with Immunocellular.

Co-authors who do not have relationships with the company include: Surasak Phuphanich, MD, PhD, first author; Christopher Wheeler, PhD; Jeremy Rudnick, MD; Jethro Hu, MD; Mia Mazer; Hong Q. Wang; Miriam Nuno; Cherry Sanchez; Xuemo Fan; Jianfel Ji; and Ray Chu, MD.

Citation: Abstract and poster presentation at Fourth Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology, hosted by the Society for Neuro-Oncology, in San Francisco Nov. 21-24. Poster session from 5 to 7 p.m. PST Saturday, Nov. 23: "Long Term Remission Over 5 Years in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma (GBM) Treated with ICT-107 Vaccine: A Follow Up Study."