Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Nov. 22, 2013 | Archived Issues

Formulary Expanded; FDA Warns About Immune Globulins, Spinal Catheters, Cardiac Drugs

Pharmacy Focus

The Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee added ticagrelor (Brilinta®) to the formulary and took other actions Oct. 1. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cautioned about human immune globulin products, the use of spinal catheters in patients taking anticoagulants and two cardiac stress test agents.

» Read more


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - November 2013 (PDF)

Physicians Must Attest to Influenza Vaccination Status Online

To ensure that members of the medical staff are in compliance with the Los Angeles County Public Health order about flu vaccination, physicians should go online before Dec. 1 and fill out a flu vaccination status.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Rearranging the Tool Bar

OpTime is live. That means that CS-Link™ is now the record in the operating room. Some physicians may have been happy to find the tab Surgeon OR Reports in the middle of the tool bar. Some may prefer to move this tab over to the right. Remember that you can move items on the tool bar by using the wrench.

» Read more

Spend a Night at the Museum

Medical staff members and their families are invited to A Night at the Museum, a dinner and sleepover at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, on Friday, Feb. 28.

» Read more

Headache Clinic Has Painless Opening

Although headaches are considered by the World Health Organization to be the third-most-disabling illness, the study and treatment of headache pain remains less than ideal. In an effort to fill that gap, the Cedars-Sinai Headache Clinic opened Aug. 1 with Ronald Andiman, MD, as its director.

 

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for October

The Circle of Friends program honored 149 people in October. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Physicians Test Experimental Regimen for Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Alain C. Mita, MD, is fighting an uphill battle against small cell lung cancer. Despite the severity of the disease, the standard-of-care treatment remains the same today as it was nearly 30 years ago.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Patient Is First in U.S. to Receive Newly Approved Device to Fix Mitral Valve

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute patient is the first in the nation since the procedure's approval to undergo a nonsurgical method to fix a leaky — and life-threatening — heart valve condition.

» Read more

'Award-Winning Care' More Than Words

Thank-You Cards Not Enough, So Heart Transplant Patient Gives Team a Trophy

Jorge Nishii got his new heart in September. So the way he sees it, the team of healthcare professionals at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center deserves a little something, too.

» Read more

New Exhibit Will Display Cedars-Sinai's History

If you walk down the hallway near the Medical Library, stop to check out the large photo of the old house that's on display. That house was where Cedars-Sinai began. And the photo is the beginning of what will soon be a new Historical Conservancy exhibit about the medical center's storied past.

» Read more

Run for Her Raises Nearly $900,000

More than 5,400 people participated in the ninth annual Run for Her® 5K Run and Friendship Walk on Nov. 10, raising nearly $900,000 for ovarian cancer awareness and research at Cedars-Sinai.
 

» Read more

Mentoring Tomorrow's Medical Scientists

Cedars-Sinai Experience Proves Valuable for High School Students

Lara Schwieger has more exposure than most 17-year-olds to the world of medicine — and not just because her parents are physicians. This past summer, she spent a month observing top scientists in a Cedars-Sinai laboratory as part of the medical center's Teens in Science program.

» Read more

Physicians Must Attest to Influenza Vaccination Status Online

To ensure that members of the medical staff are in compliance with the Los Angeles County Public Health order about flu vaccination, physicians should go online before Dec. 1 and fill out a flu vaccination status.

Effective Dec. 1, the order requires all healthcare workers — including medical staff and house staff — to get the flu vaccination. If they decline vaccination, they are required to wear a surgical mask at all times while in direct contact with patients or while in areas where patient care is provided. Enforcement of this policy will continue through March 31, 2014, when flu season ends. Click the PDF link below for more information about the implementation plan at Cedars-Sinai.

As part of the implementation plan, which was approved by the Medical Executive Committee on Nov. 4, Cedars-Sinai will issue special ID badge accessories indicating vaccination status. Green badges indicate vaccination, and orange badges indicate that the healthcare worker has declined vaccination and is wearing a mask to protect patients from the flu.

Once you fill out the online form, Medical Staff Services will mail the appropriate badge to you, or you can pick up your badge during normal business hours at the medical staff office, Suite 2211 on the North Tower Plaza Level.

Cedars-Sinai is offering free flu shots for members of the medical staff, employees and volunteers through Dec. 30. Please note these upcoming clinics:

  • Nov. 22 – 8-11 a.m., West Medical Office Tower, 590 West conference room
  • Nov. 22 – 11 a.m.-noon, North Tower, fifth floor
  • Nov. 22 – 1-2:45 p.m., Graduate Medical Education, Beverly Boulevard

Further information about the Los Angeles County Public Health order may be found here.

Fill out the flu vaccination status at http://www.cedars-sinai.edu/fluvaccine.

Flu Vaccination Policy FAQ (PDF)

CS-Link Tip: Rearranging the Tool Bar

OpTime is live. That means that CS-Link™ is now the record in the operating room.

Some physicians may have been happy to find the tab Surgeon OR Reports in the middle of the tool bar. Some may prefer to move this tab over to the right. Remember that you can move items on the tool bar by using the wrench. Click the link below if you need help.

For super users, Ed Phillips, MD, points out a great time saver — bookmarks. You never have to type the same thing twice. If you want your plan to be in a patient's after-visit summary, you can put that documentation between bookmarks and have it imported into the summary.

To support the transition to OpTime and Anesthesia, another new addition to CS-Link, an OpTime/Anesthesia Resource Center is available now through Dec. 6. The resource center is in room 2806, on the South Tower Plaza Level. Hours are 7 a.m.-5 p.m. The center will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28.

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians.

Spend a Night at the Museum

A photo from the 2013 event

Medical staff members and their families are invited to A Night at the Museum, a dinner and sleepover at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, on Friday, Feb. 28.

Eat dinner in the shadow of a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, and explore the most prolific trade route in history with a private tour through the museum's new exhibit "Traveling the Silk Road." Pack sleeping bags, blankets, pillows and air mattresses (no tents). Dinner, exhibits and entertainment are included, as is a continental breakfast.

Cost is $65 per adult and $45 per child under 12. The cost for those who don't spend the night is $50 per adult and $25 per child under 12. Parking is $10 per car.

Call Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 to reserve tickets.

See coverage of the 2013 event here.

Headache Clinic Has Painless Opening

Although headaches are considered by the World Health Organization to be the third-most-disabling illness, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer, the study and treatment of headache pain remains less than ideal.

In an effort to fill that gap, the Cedars-Sinai Headache Clinic in the Department of Neurology opened its doors Aug. 1 with Ronald Andiman, MD, as its director.

"Headache is not a fatal disease, but it causes a huge amount of suffering," said Andiman (pictured at right), a board-certified neurologist who has been on staff at Cedars-Sinai for more than 30 years. Andiman is also certified in the subspecialty of headache medicine by the United Council of Neurological Subspecialties.

"People who suffer from headache, which is not a visible illness, are often disparaged or not taken seriously," Andiman said. "As a result, a large percentage never seek medical care for headache and, consequently, are undertreated."

Serious headaches include cluster headaches, paroxysmal hemicrania, hypnic headaches and migraines. Headaches can last anywhere from a few hours, which is common for hypnic headaches, to several days, as is sometimes the case with severe migraines.

About 15 percent of women and 7 percent of men suffer from migraines. Chronic headaches, defined as 15 or more headaches per month, affect about 4-5 percent of the population, according to the WHO.

"We find that patients will take over-the-counter medications on a frequent basis, and the act of doing that actually leads to rebound headaches," Andiman said. "This, in turn, leads to further medication overuse, a cycle that can often make the headache pain even more persistent than it already was."

Although for decades medical options for severe headaches were limited, the advent of new medications and a new understanding of the physiology of headache beginning in the 1990s led to significantly more effective treatment, Andiman said.

Cedars-Sinai Headache Clinic

  • Hours: Thursdays, 1-5 p.m.
  • Location: Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, Suite A6600

The clinic is taking referrals for patients experiencing severe or chronic headaches. Serious headaches include cluster, paroxysmal hemicrania, hypnic and migraine headaches.

"There are many headache types and not one treatment that fits all," he said. "It's very important for the physician to make an accurate diagnosis, and only then can the appropriate treatment be applied." Though there are many headache categories, there are as many headaches as there are patients, and management must be individualized.

Teaching patients about the origins of their headaches is a crucial part of treatment. For instance, migraines can be triggered by foods such as red wine, cheese and chocolate, or even by certain preservatives. But headache sufferers often don't make the connection between the food they eat and the migraine that starts the next day.

The Headache Clinic, located in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, is open Thursday afternoons. Andiman is its primary physician, and hospital residents rotate through as part of their training.

Though much work remains to be done in headache research, with education and medical treatment, patients can get significant relief, Andiman said.

"I have had patients who had daily headaches for 20 years who now are having only occasional, easily managed headaches."

Circle of Friends Honorees for October

The Circle of Friends program honored 149 people in October.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Daniel C. Allison, MD
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Rowena S. Bascon-Abdon, RN, BSN, MSN
  • Marites G. Bautista
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Valerie Betley
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Swaraj Bose, MD
  • Darina Brezhnev, PharmD
  • William W. Brien, MD
  • Wendy Briggs
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Barbara Brown
  • Eileen G. Brown, OCN, RN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Mathew H. Bui, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Michael A. Bush, MD
  • Neyra Cannon, CNA
  • John D. Carmichael, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Christopher Chang, MD, PhD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Piyaporn Chantravat, RN
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Michelle Chung, RN
  • Ruth Cousineau, MD
  • Arlene Curry
  • Hal C. Danzer, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Todd Davis
  • Michael T. Duffy, MD
  • Julie A. Dunhill, MD
  • Matthew R. Eng, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Robert A. Figlin, MD
  • David Finke, MD
  • Lindsy J. Forbess, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Erwin Peter Gabor, MD
  • Donna Gallik, MD
  • Elayne K. Garber, MD
  • Francine J. Gates
  • Sara Ghandehari, MD
  • Mitch Gheorghiu, MD
  • Diana Gilker, RN
  • Eli Ginsburg, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Julian A. Gold, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Crystal F. Gonzalez, RN
  • Aimee Goseland, RN
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Leland M. Green, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Behrooz Hakimian, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD   
  • David D. Hopp, MD
  • Kevin W. Hopwood, RN
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Michelle Israel, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Omar Kabba
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Robert M. Kass, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Dong U. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Lyle D. Kurtz, MD
  • Michael M. Levine, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Stephen W. Lim, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Joanne Lutman, RN
  • Cleofe F. Macasias, RN
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Edmund J. Martinez
  • Bryan M. May, RN
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Mary Katharine McCormick, RN
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Shlomo Melmed, MD
  • Anne Meyer, MD
  • Amin Joseph Mirhadi, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Joel D. Mittleman, MD
  • Alejandro Molina
  • Doris S. Moradzadeh, MD
  • Arpine Nahabedian, RN
  • Dan I. Naim, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Victoria K. Nigro, RN-BC
  • Veronica Palacios, LVN
  • Shi-Hui Pan, PharmD
  • Edward H. Phillips Jr., MD
  • Joann Porter
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Rebeca Raymundo
  • Joseph R. Recinos
  • Rafael Rodriguez
  • Jay S. Rudin, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Jeffrey H. Sherman, MD
  • Nancy L. Sicotte, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Christina J. Soto
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Martin Stern, PhD, MPH
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Rae D. Syms, RN
  • Esperanza Tercero
  • William C. To, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Serkan Tusu
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Billy O. Villao
  • Mary Jane Vos, RN, BSN, CDE
  • Bethany Wendel
  • Paula J. Whiteman, MD
  • Donald A. Wiss, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Arthur Wu, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD

Physicians Test Experimental Regimen for Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Alain C. Mita, MD, is fighting an uphill battle against small cell lung cancer. Despite the severity of the disease, the standard-of-care treatment remains the same today as it was nearly 30 years ago.

Small cell lung cancer, which includes oat cell carcinoma, is a more aggressive disease than other types of lung cancer and often is more advanced at the time of diagnosis. Smoking is the most common cause, and the disease can be diagnosed even decades after an individual has quit smoking. At advanced stages, the disease is incurable in the vast majority of patients, with a median survival less than 12 months.

Mita said that following a diagnosis of small cell lung cancer, most patients opt for immediate chemotherapy using the standard-of-care chemotherapy drugs etoposide and cisplatin, both of which were developed more than three decades ago. This standard chemotherapy regimen responds well initially, many times putting patients into remission. But within months, most patients relapse.

Today, a new Cedars-Sinai phase I-II clinical trial may improve treatment approaches and combat disease recurrence. But first, Mita needs to find patients to participate in the clinical trial.

"Our team of physician scientists is committed to advancing treatment options for patients diagnosed with small cell lung cancer and other types of lung disease," said Mita, co-director of the Experimental Therapeutics Program at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. "The eligibility criteria for this specific clinical trial can be a challenge, as patients must have no treatment history. Our team encourages patients and their treating physician to consider available clinical trials that include the combination of the standard of care and a novel agent."

The approach being tested in the clinical trial works by combining the standard-of-care chemotherapy with a NOTCH inhibitor (OMP-59R5), a targeted therapy designed to directly attack cancerous stem cells.

Patients interested in small cell lung cancer trials or other clinical trials at Cedars-Sinai may visit cancertrialinfo.csmc.edu or contact Jaime Richardson, RN, BSN, OCN, CCRP, clinical trial navigator at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, at 310-423-2133 or cancer.trial.info@cshs.org.

Co-investigators include Monica Mita, MD, co-director of the Experimental Therapeutics Program, Ronald Natale, MD, medical director of the Clinical Lung Cancer Program, and Edward Wolin, MD, co-director of the Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Program.

Study name: A phase Ib/II study of OMP-59R5 in combination with etoposide and cisplatin in subjects with untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer.

Cedars-Sinai Patient Is First in U.S. to Receive Newly Approved Device to Fix Mitral Valve

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute patient Pearl Segal (seated) celebrates a successful outcome with her family and healthcare team. From left: David Segal, son; cardiologist Saibal Kar, MD; Zalman Segal, husband; senior physician assistant Asma Hussaini, MS, PA-C; and Lee Weinstein, daughter.

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute patient is the first in the nation since the procedure's approval to undergo a nonsurgical method to fix a leaky — and life-threatening — heart valve condition.

The first patient in the U.S. to have the MitraClip® procedure following approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was Pearl Segal, 83, of Phoenix. Segal was diagnosed two years ago with mitral valve regurgitation, a backward flow of blood in the heart caused by a leaky valve.

The procedure was performed by Saibal Kar, MD, the Heart Institute's director of Cardiovascular Intervention Center Research. Kar has performed more MitraClip procedures than any other U.S. physician, according to manufacturer Abbott.

Mitral regurgitation is a debilitating, progressive and life-threatening disease that affects more than 4 million in the United States, raising their risk of heart failure, irregular heartbeats, stroke and death. Medication can manage their symptoms, but medication does not stop the progression of mitral regurgitation. But Segal, like many elderly patients with mitral valve regurgitation, was too frail to undergo open-heart mitral valve surgery, which is the standard-of-care treatment.

Before undergoing the procedure, Segal would get out of breath merely walking down the hall of her home. Just hours after her 45-minute mitral valve procedure Nov. 4, Segal's son, David, said, "Her color is better, she's not getting out of breath and she's smiling."

Pearl Segal said undergoing the mitral procedure was much easier than her 2009 experience with open-heart surgery to fix an unrelated heart condition. That surgery required 10 days of hospitalization, followed by two weeks of cardiac rehabilitation and a month of in-home nursing.

"I won this time," she said as she prepared to go home the day after her procedure. "This is better than winning the lottery."

"Mitral valves can become dysfunctional for several reasons, including age," Kar said. "But as we age, we face higher risk from open-heart surgery. Catheter-based, minimally invasive heart procedures are a way we can add years to life and life to years."

During clinical trials, Kar and other Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute physicians performed more catheter-based mitral valve repairs than any other U.S. medical center. Kar receives compensation from Abbott for teaching clinicians how to implant the MitraClip device.

During the procedure, the MitraClip device is delivered to the heart through the femoral vein. Once implanted, the device allows the mitral valve to open and close correctly without leaking, thereby relieving symptoms and improving the patient's quality of life. Patients undergoing MitraClip treatment typically experience short recovery times and short hospital stays.

"This device offers new hope for thousands of patients with leaky valves worldwide," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. "We are proud to have been the leading site in the clinical trials that led to approval, and we look forward to offering this innovative therapy to all those in need."

'Award-Winning Care' More Than Words

Heart transplant patient Jorge Nishii (left) shakes hands with Denise Piastrelli, RN, CN IV, after presenting a trophy to the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

Thank-You Cards Not Enough, So Heart Transplant Patient Gives Team a Trophy

Jorge Nishii got his new heart in September. So the way he sees it, the team of healthcare professionals at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center deserves a little something, too.

"I don't even know how to put into words how I was treated," said Nishii, 67, of Santa Fe Springs, who underwent a heart transplant on Sept. 8, just days after his birthday. "Everyone took care of me and went out of their way every day. I feel like I was treated like I was the only patient in the hospital."

In fact, Nishii is one of more than 100 heart patients who have received heart transplants at Cedars-Sinai during 2013. For the past three years, Cedars-Sinai has performed more adult heart transplants than any other U.S. medical center, according to statistics compiled by the United Network for Organ Sharing, the nonprofit organization that manages the nation's transplant system.

The glass trophy is engraved with the names of many of the medical center's programs and nursing units.

As Nishii recovered from his surgery, he kept himself busy by walking the medical center's hallways, visiting with his wife, three daughters and three grandchildren, writing thank-you cards to his nurses and filling out Standing Ovations for nearly 20 members of his patient care team.

But when Nishii, a production manager for an aerospace parts manufacturer, was discharged to go home to Santa Fe Springs, he didn't think the thank-you cards and Standing Ovations quite captured the depth of his gratitude. That's when he got the idea of awarding a trophy to the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

"I feel like the way Cedars-Sinai took care of me, they deserve some kind of special gratitude from us," Nishii said. "I told my wife and my kids, 'I want to give everyone involved in my care a trophy to show how much I appreciate everything they did for me and my family.'"

And that's exactly what he did.

On Nov. 6, Nishii attended his final heart transplant clinic before being cleared to return to the care of his longtime cardiologist. He brought with him his wife, Lilly, and two of their three daughters, Joanne and Michelle, along with a gleaming glass trophy engraved with the names of many of the medical center's programs and nursing units. The family presented the trophy to a team of heart transplant clinic caregivers led by Denise Piastrelli, RN, CN IV, and Jignesh Patel, MD.

Jorge Nishii (center) with members of the heart transplant team and his family

"Every member of the heart transplant team feels rewarded whenever a patient goes home with a new heart and a second chance at life," said Piastrelli, of the Advanced Heart Disease Center. "Now, all we have to do is look at Mr. Nishii's trophy to be reminded of the important work we do and how fortunate we are to make such a difference in our patients' lives."

Jon Kobashigawa, MD, director of the Heart Transplant Program, wasn't surprised by Nishii's gratitude toward his caregivers. "The Cedars-Sinai Heart Transplant Team excels in outstanding patient care," Kobashigawa said. "They are the most caring and compassionate people who truly understand what our heart transplant patients are experiencing.

"I believe that our multidisciplinary team approach contributes greatly to patient care, which includes nursing, social work, pharmacy, nutrition, financial and many other services."

New Exhibit Will Display Cedars-Sinai's History

A photo, displayed to promote an upcoming Historical Conservancy exhibit, shows Kaspare Cohn Hospital, a predecessor of Cedars-Sinai.

If you walk down the hallway near the Medical Library, stop to check out the large photo of the old house that's on display — the black-and-white image of an ornately designed, Queen Anne-style residence.

That house was where Cedars-Sinai began. And the photo is the beginning of what will soon be a new Historical Conservancy exhibit, a permanent display of documents and artifacts related to the medical center's storied past.

"That photo shows the first tangible building in the evolution of what, over the decades, has become our current medical center," said Leo Gordon, MD, an attending physician who has been on the staff of Cedars-Sinai for 35 years. Gordon is a founding member of the committee that, for the past eight years, has worked to turn the Cedars-Sinai Historical Conservancy from an idea into an archive.

The purpose of the conservancy is to collect, restore and preserve artifacts and documents related to the founding and development of the medical center and the significant role it has played in Los Angeles and the area's Jewish community.

"A lot of people don't realize the hospital is 112 years old," Gordon said. "The medical center represents the evolution of a high standard of medical care, and its growth is closely tied to the growth of Los Angeles."

The exhibit will open on June 6, 2014, the date of Cedars-Sinai's first Founder's Day celebration, which the medical center is planning to make into an annual observance. The exhibit will trace the growth of Cedars-Sinai from its first days as the Kaspare Cohn Hospital — founded in 1902 in that ornate house, still standing in what is now Angelino Heights — to today's medical center.

The hallway has always honored Cedars-Sinai's past by displaying historical photos of the Medical Executive Committee. Those photos will be incorporated into the new display, which will also include more photographs, historical documents and collectibles such as a parking sticker from 1966 and a hospital menu from 1954.

The hallway runs along the north side of the South Tower. The photo is visible from the front doors of the Plaza Café.

Until the exhibit makes its debut, a different photograph featuring a major figure from the medical center’s history will be displayed each month. To stimulate interest in the project, a question about each photo (and the answer) will be posted with it.

"We're a unique institution with a unique history, and we share a sizable portion of that history with both the Jewish community and with the city of Los Angeles," said Jonathan Schreiber, director of Community Engagement. "The medical center and the city grew on parallel tracks — a lot of the innovations here were directly tied to what was happening in the city at the time — and so our pasts are intertwined."

If you have Cedars-Sinai memorabilia that you would like to donate to the archives, you can contact the conservancy at 323-866-2925 or conservancy@cshs.org.

Run for Her Raises Nearly $900,000

Click the image above to see a video slideshow from Run for Her.

More than 5,400 people participated in the ninth annual Run for Her® 5K Run and Friendship Walk on Nov. 10, raising nearly $900,000 for ovarian cancer awareness and research at Cedars-Sinai.

The total of 5,460 participants includes 1,637 runners, 3,094 walkers and 729 "sleepwalkers," registered participants who didn't attend the event. Sleepwalkers and other participants were from all 50 states.

In addition to the total from the Los Angeles event, the inaugural Run for Her New York Walk on Oct. 27 has raised more than $76,000. More than 200 runners and walkers took part in the New York event.

Donations to the 2013 Run for Her may be made until Dec. 31 at runforher.com.

Mentoring Tomorrow's Medical Scientists

Moshe Arditi, MD, instructs high school student Lara Schwieger in his lab.

Cedars-Sinai Experience Proves Valuable for High School Students

Lara Schwieger has more exposure than most 17-year-olds to the world of medicine — and not just because her parents are physicians. This past summer, she spent a month observing top scientists in a Cedars-Sinai laboratory as part of the medical center's Teens in Science program.

She learned about T-cells, oxygen saturation tests, macrophages and much more. She even overcame an aversion to laboratory mice as she saw firsthand how important they are to medical research.

"I wanted to see if research is something I could do as a career, or if I would prefer to be a doctor and work with patients," Schwieger said. "I like both. It will take more time to figure this out."

Schwieger — whose mother, Cynthia Litwer Schwieger, MD, is a radiologist at Cedars-Sinai, and whose father is a nephrologist in Tarzana — is one of many high school students who spent part of their summer vacation observing the process of basic research and receiving one-on-one mentoring from faculty members representing many disciplines. Cedars-Sinai reaches out to students interested in medical careers through a number of avenues, including a weeklong Regenerative Medicine Institute program that introduces them to the potential of stem cells to advance treatment for diseases of the gut, brain or heart.

"The idea behind these high school outreach programs is, ultimately, to bring young, motivated, bright minds from our community and the city of Los Angeles to Cedars-Sinai," said Mahul B. Amin, MD, chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, who created the Teens in Science program in 2009 along with staff members from the departments of Environmental Health and Safety and Volunteer Services.

"Not only will such efforts relieve the nation's shortage of medical lab scientists and other healthcare professionals, but they also expose these young individuals to the exciting science occurring at the medical center," Amin said. "This will enhance the understanding of these future potential scientists and physicians that Cedars-Sinai is not only world class as a patient care facility, but is a place where exciting discovery and innovation constantly occur."

Among the Cedars-Sinai researchers who mentor high school students through this program is Moshe Arditi, MD, director of the Infectious and Immunological Diseases Research Center and the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

Arditi brings about six students into his lab each summer. Often, they are recommended by their high school science teachers and then placed through Cedars-Sinai's Volunteer Services Department in one of the labs that Environmental Health and Safety has designated as "teen approved."

Schwieger, a senior at Viewpoint School in Calabasas, spent July observing experiments in Arditi's lab, and she had a number of opportunities to ask questions and discuss career options with him.

Arditi enjoys giving teens exposure to the day-to-day activities in his lab.

"They learn whether they like the tedious work of research," he said. "And they see a spectrum of career paths. I think it's great that Cedars-Sinai provides this opportunity for students interested in biological science and research."

Arditi had high praise for Schwieger's determination to make the most of the experience. "She learned a lot, and was even able to conquer her initial fear of mouse models," he said.

Schwieger said she picked up laboratory skills that will be helpful in her science classes as she finishes high school and goes on to college. One unexpected discovery: The lab wasn't the frenetic, high-pressure environment she had imagined.

"The people I worked with were so knowledgeable, professional and relaxed," she said. "It made me feel that I could do this kind of work as a career and be relaxed about it, too."

To learn more about how Cedars-Sinai mentors teens interested in medical careers, call the Volunteer Services Department at 310-423-8044 and ask for Sandra Gomez.