Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Dec. 19, 2014 | Archived Issues

P and T Approvals, FDA Warnings About Alglucosidase Alfa, Methoxy Polyethylene Glycol-Epoetin Beta

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the Oct. 7 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings about alglucosidase alfa and methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta.

» Read more


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - December 2014 (PDF)


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue. Click here to email us your milestones and comments.

» Read more

Insurance Update for Patients Who Want Cedars-Sinai Health Coverage (2015 Plan Year)

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO 

Open enrollment for individual and family health insurance runs through Feb. 15, 2015, and many of you may get questions from patients who want to ensure that their plan continues to cover care from Cedars-Sinai. I'd like to share the following information to help you address such questions and let you know about the additional resources Cedars-Sinai has developed to help our patients navigate the changing insurance marketplace.

» Read more

A Very Successful Joint Commission Survey

From Mark R. Gavens, Chief Operating Officer; 
Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer

Once again, you have demonstrated your passion, teamwork and commitment to our patients and community during last week's successful Joint Commission survey.

» Read more

Improvements Made to Inpatient CT Scan Ordering

Two out of three inpatient CT scans are ordered as STAT, and there has been no way to prioritize these requests. As a result, there have been delays in care for patients who truly need urgent CT imaging. Therefore, ordering options in CS-Link™ have been enhanced.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Web Activities

On the top tool bar of CS-Link™ you will find Web Activities. In case you haven't clicked it recently, it is worth a look.

» Read more

Supportive Care Medicine Gets Vital Aid to Patients

The common misconceptions about "palliative care" are giving way to greater awareness of how patients with advanced, life-limiting — but not necessarily terminal — illnesses can benefit from a clinical team dedicated to alleviating pain and suffering and improving quality of life. Palliative care has come of age at Cedars-Sinai as inpatient, outpatient and cancer center services have been integrated under a single program called Supportive Care Medicine.

» Read more

POLST Form Gets an Update for 2014

The California form for Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment has been revised for 2014, after five years of clinical experience and data collection, to be clearer and more accessible to patients and physicians.

» Read more

Study: Computer's Reports Preferable to Doctors'

A computer system was more effective than doctors at collecting information about patient symptoms, producing reports that were more complete, organized and useful than narratives generated by physicians during office visits, according to a Cedars-Sinai study.

» Read more

Night at the Aquarium Set for Feb. 7

Medical staff members and their families are invited to a Night at the Aquarium, a dinner and sleepover at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, on Saturday, Feb. 7, starting at 7 p.m.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 204 people in November. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Recognition for Alban, Gordon, McAlpin, Puri

Physician News

Rodrigo Alban, MD, won a "poster of exceptional merit" award at the annual meeting of the American College of Surgeons, Leo Gordon, MD, delivered the keynote address at the annual meeting of the Herb Fred Society, and Asha Puri, MD, and the late Columbus McCalpin, MD, have been inducted into the Benjamin Kagan Society.

» Read more

Insurance Update for Patients Who Want Cedars-Sinai Health Coverage (2015 Plan Year)

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO 

Open enrollment for individual and family health insurance runs through Feb. 15, 2015, and many of you may get questions from patients who want to ensure that their plan continues to cover care from Cedars-Sinai. I'd like to share the following information to help you address such questions and let you know about the additional resources Cedars-Sinai has developed to help our patients navigate the changing insurance marketplace.

Please note that this open enrollment only affects people who purchase their own insurance policies for themselves and their families; it does not affect those who receive health insurance through their employer, such as Cedars-Sinai employees.

The first thing you should know is that the insurance options that include coverage for Cedars-Sinai have changed from the 2014 plan year. This applies to plans available both through the Covered California health benefit exchange and those purchased directly from an insurance company or broker.

The following plans provide coverage for care from Cedars-Sinai:

Through the Covered California health benefit exchange:

  • Anthem Blue Cross Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) plans (all metal levels — e.g., Platinum, Gold, Silver, Bronze)

Through an insurance broker or insurance company directly (off the exchange):

  • Anthem Blue Cross
    • Anthem Blue Cross EPO plans (all metal levels — e.g., Platinum, Gold, Silver, Bronze)
    • Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a Tier 1 facility in EPO plans.
    • Patients can keep coverage under a grandfathered Anthem Blue Cross plan that offers their full network of providers as long as they continue to pay premiums under the plan.
  • Assurant Health
    • Assurant Health offers a full range of Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) network plans — using the Aetna PPO physician and hospital network.

At this time, it is unclear whether Cedars-Sinai will be included as a participating provider in Health Net's PPO network. Patients who want coverage for Cedars-Sinai and are interested in making a change for the 2015 plan year should consider switching to an Anthem Blue Cross EPO plan or Assurant Health PPO plan.

Patients also can keep coverage for Cedars-Sinai if they have a grandfathered Blue Shield plan that offers a full network of providers and they continue to pay premiums under the plan. Note that Cedars-Sinai is not a participating hospital in the Blue Shield PPO plans offered through Covered California, directly through Blue Shield, or through an insurance broker.

Those currently enrolled in an individual or family insurance product that will continue to be offered in 2015 were automatically re-enrolled in that product on Dec. 15; however, they will be able to switch plans until Feb. 15.

We recognize that there are many people who want to come to Cedars-Sinai but may be concerned about out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles and co-pays for hospital services. To make things easier for our patients, we offer a variety of financial assistance programs that can help people with some of these costs. These programs are available to a wide range of incomes, and more information is available online or by calling Patient Financial Services at 323-866-8600.

For your reference, linked below are a letter and fact sheet that we recently sent to our patients who likely have individual and family health insurance. For the most up-to-date information and guidance, please access the following resources:

Individual Insurance Patient Letter - December 2014 (PDF)

Plan-By-Plan Fact Sheet (PDF)

A Very Successful Joint Commission Survey

From Mark R. Gavens, Senior Vice President, Clinical Care Services, and Chief Operating Officer
Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Vice President, Nursing, and Chief Nursing Officer

Once again, you have demonstrated your passion, teamwork and commitment to our patients and community during last week's successful Joint Commission (TJC) survey.

Six surveyors from TJC spent five full days conducting a comprehensive review of the delivery of patient care and related critical services within the medical center. The survey team was composed of two physicians, two nurses, a life safety engineer and an ambulatory care specialist. They audited our compliance with the several thousand TJC standards, conducted 30 patient "tracers" and 70 medical record reviews, visited more than 75 operating areas and held discussions with hundreds of our staff and patients.

While we will not receive a final accreditation decision for several months, based on comments by the surveyors at the closing conference as well as the preliminary written report, we can share that it was a very successful survey. The surveyors consistently remarked on the exemplary performance of the organization, the exceptional programs in place to care for complex patients and, most importantly, the high level of engagement and pride demonstrated by the staff.

We will be reviewing recommendations made by TJC and the surveyors in the weeks ahead. Some may require further discussions with TJC before a final report is issued, while others will likely require our submitting additional information. A complete summary of the final findings will be provided at your upcoming staff meetings.

Accreditation is but one of the many processes we have in place at Cedars-Sinai that provide insight into our daily operations and systems, and help validate our continuous improvement efforts. Thank you for your efforts that every day deliver outstanding care to our patients and communities.

Improvements Made to Inpatient CT Scan Ordering

Two out of three inpatient CT scans are ordered as STAT, and there has been no way to prioritize these requests. As a result, there have been delays in care for patients who truly need urgent CT imaging. Therefore, ordering options in CS-Link™ have been enhanced.

There are now three categories of priority:

  • Normal (default)
  • Expedite
  • STAT

The expected completion time for STAT CT scan is four hours or less. Expedited CT is expected to be done within eight hours. Routine CT is expected to be done within 16 hours. 

When selecting Expedite or STAT, you will be asked to indicate the reason.

For more detailed information, please visit CS-Link Central.

CS-Link Tip: Web Activities

On the top tool bar of CS-Link™, you will find Web Activities. In case you haven't clicked it recently, it is worth a look.

Have you ever needed to print a form such as Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment or the Department of Motor Vehicles application for a disabled permit? Have you ever questioned what a resulting lab has in a specific panel? The links to this information are under Web Activities.

These often-needed resources are at your fingertips. Using Web Activities is quicker and easier than leaving CS-Link to search the internet, and this tool keeps getting better.

You can learn more by visiting CS-Link Central or by scheduling a training session with Lisa Masson, MD, (lisa.masson@cshs.org) Shaun Miller, MD, (shaun.miller@cshs.org) or Alex Bram (alex.bram@cshs.org).

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians.

Supportive Care Medicine Gets Vital Aid to Patients

Supportive Care Medicine team members Todd Barrett, MD, (left) and Jaime Goldberg, LCSW, discuss patient care.

It's not hospice care. It's not just for hospital patients. And it shouldn't be a last resort.

The common misconceptions about "palliative care" are giving way to greater awareness of how patients with advanced, life-limiting — but not necessarily terminal — illnesses can benefit from a clinical team dedicated to alleviating pain and suffering and improving quality of life.

Supportive Care Medicine Leadership

The Supportive Care Medicine program is led by Brad Rosen, MD, medical director of the Office of Care Transitions and Complex Medical Management. The program's leadership team includes:

  • Deane Wolcott, MD, director, oncology
  • Arash Asher, MD, director, Cancer Survivorship and Rehabilitation
  • Susan Stone, MD, associate medical director, who oversees outpatient care
  • Rishi Gupta, MD, assistant director, inpatient care
  • Eve Newhart, MD, assistant director, oncology
  • Todd Barrett, MD, assistant director, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute

Other clinical team members include:

  • Jeffrey Angeles, MD
  • Steph Cassone, NP
  • Azi Dashti, MD
  • Jaime Goldberg, LCSW
  • Garo Harmandayan, MD
  • Erin Reeve, MD
  • Arvind Shinde, MD
  • Naureen Khan
  • Christina Shu, MDiv
  • Melissa Wilkinson, NP

Palliative care has come of age at Cedars-Sinai as inpatient, outpatient and cancer center services have been integrated under a single program called Supportive Care Medicine. This transition has taken place over the past year under the leadership of Brad Rosen, MD, medical director of the Office of Care Transitions and Complex Medical Management.

"We're building a next-generation program that provides rigorous attention to the comfort and well-being of patients at the bedside, in physician offices, in skilled nursing facilities, assisted living and in their homes," Rosen said.

The earlier patients are referred to Supportive Care Medicine, the better.

"From the time of diagnosis of a serious condition, our team can provide an extra layer of support for patients and families, whether they're receiving treatment with curative intent or to help with symptoms such as pain and/or suffering at the end of life," Rosen said. "By integrating Supportive Care Medicine consults into the treatment of patients with a wide variety of illnesses, our team helps to ensure that care is personalized and appropriate, and reflects each patient's wishes, goals and burden tolerance."

The Supportive Care Medicine team works in collaboration with primary care physicians and specialists. Services include providing complex pain and symptom management for patients along with emotional and spiritual support. Team members also help:

  • Facilitate advance care planning discussions and completion of Advance Healthcare Directive or Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment forms
  • Organize family meetings and clarify patient and family expectations
  • Discuss goals of care and assist with decision-making about treatment options
  • Manage end-of-life care

The interdisciplinary Supportive Care Medicine team includes doctors, nurse practitioners, clinical social workers, pharmacists, food and nutrition experts, chaplains and mental health experts. They help care for patients with such conditions as cancer, congestive heart failure, dementia, AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney failure, liver disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke.

The expansion and redefining of Supportive Care Medicine is part of an effort throughout Cedars-Sinai to deliver greater value to patients by providing higher-quality, patient-centered care.

"Supportive Care Medicine is designed to be more proactive in the management of patients who are seriously ill," Rosen said. "If we take steps earlier to manage symptoms and discuss goals of care, the evidence indicates that we can both improve patient experience and lower medical costs by reducing preventable hospital stays and readmissions. And there's growing evidence of how supportive care benefits patients. For example, in one study, patients who have end-stage lung cancer and received supportive care lived longer than those who didn't — with better quality of life."

Plans to further develop the program include education for nonpalliative care clinicians to improve their primary palliative care skills, clinical outcomes research on topics related to Supportive Care Medicine, and community outreach to encourage patients and families to do advance care planning.

To request a Supportive Care Medicine consult for a patient, clinicians can place an order in CS-Link™ for "Supportive Care Medicine" or call 310-423-9520 (inpatient) or 310-423-7500 (outpatient). For questions or additional information about Supportive Care Medicine, please contact Rosen at rosenb@cshs.org.

POLST Form Gets an Update for 2014

Bright pink POLST forms are available at all nursing units, from the Supportive Care Medicine team and from the Center for Healthcare Ethics.

The California form for Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) has been revised for 2014, after five years of clinical experience and data collection, to be clearer and more accessible to patients and physicians.

Developed in Oregon in the 1990s and legally recognized in California since 2009, the POLST is a physician's order that outlines a plan for end-of-life care reflecting a patient's preferences and current medical condition. The bright pink POLST forms are available at all nursing units as well as from the Supportive Care Medicine team. They also are available on the Intranet and Internet pages of the Center for Healthcare Ethics.

A POLST form allows a physician and patient to establish default orders concerning end-of-life care that can be conveyed succinctly and clearly to other healthcare professionals, facilities and emergency personnel when a patient is at home, in a long-term care facility, in transit between locations, entering an emergency department or being admitted into or discharged from an acute-care facility.

The POLST form is completed by a patient's physician (or by someone who has undergone special training about POLST, such as a member of the Supportive Care Medicine team) in conjunction with thorough conversation with the patient regarding the patient's current and future health conditions and treatment preferences. Both the physician and patient must sign the POLST. If the patient lacks capacity to make medical decisions, the patient's legally recognized decision-maker can participate in completing and signing the POLST form.

For patients who arrive at Cedars-Sinai with a POLST, those orders are to be entered into the patient's medical record and stand until further orders are written, if necessary. Similarly, for patients being discharged to another facility or home, completing a POLST is a way to have the appropriate orders continue beyond the hospital walls.

Completing a POLST would be appropriate for any patient who, while at Cedars-Sinai, has Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) status, has been seen by the Supportive Care Medicine team, is being discharged to hospice, or has a metastatic or end-stage organ disease or a terminal diagnosis and for whom death in the next 12 months would not be unexpected. A POLST also may be appropriate for patients permanently residing in long-term care facilities.

If you have additional questions about the POLST form, are interested in further education or would like assistance in having the POLST conversation, please contact the Supportive Care Medicine team (310-423-9520 inpatient, 310-423-7500 outpatient) or the Center for Healthcare Ethics (310-423-9636).

Additional information about POLST, as well as copies of the form and a FAQ sheet in English, Spanish, Russian, Farsi, or Korean, may be found here.

Study: Computer's Reports Preferable to Doctors'

A computer system was more effective than doctors at collecting information about patient symptoms, producing reports that were more complete, organized and useful than narratives generated by physicians during office visits, according to a Cedars-Sinai study.

Investigators said the research, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, highlights the potential of computers to enhance the quality of medical care and improve outcomes by harnessing accurate and thorough patient information.

The authors said they did not expect technology to replace physicians in the exam room. Instead, they said that computers can empower doctors to practice medicine more efficiently and effectively as they face growing requirements to document symptoms, diagnoses and other patient data.

"Our results suggest that computers can help clinicians focus on what they do best — practicing the distinctly human art of medicine," said Brennan Spiegel, MD, a study author and director of Cedars-Sinai Health Services Research. "This study offers initial proof that a computer can create meaningful and relevant patient histories that are useful in the clinical setting."

The researchers conducted their study in outpatient gastrointestinal clinics in Los Angeles, identifying 75 patients who reported a variety of active symptoms, including abdominal pain, heartburn, reflux, nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

Patients were seen initially by doctors, who typed or dictated information about illness histories into the electronic health record system. The patients later answered questions about their conditions on a website called My GI Health. An algorithm on the website collected the answers and translated them into patient narratives.

The reports generated by the doctors and the computer system were evaluated by a separate group of physicians who had no knowledge of the study, including the fact that half of the patient histories were written by a computer. The reviewers were told only that they were auditing the quality of reports in gastrointestinal clinics.

The reviewers concluded that the computer-generated summaries were superior, describing them as better organized and more complete, succinct, comprehensive and useful.

"The computer-generated narratives were of higher quality overall," said Christopher V. Almario, MD, a Cedars-Sinai-based gastroenterology fellow and a lead author of the study.

The researchers said computers offer a solution to the problem of doctors entering incomplete or inaccurate information into patients' records. The technology also frees physicians to focus more on patients during office visits and to catch important bits of information and nonverbal cues that might otherwise be missed.

The investigators suggested that patients are comfortable disclosing health information in "virtual human" interviews through the Web-based questionnaire.

"The study reveals that computers can lift at least some of the burden from doctors by collecting and analyzing data," Spiegel said.

The research was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System.

Subsequent Cedars-Sinai research will examine whether computer-generated reports can enhance the physician-patient relationship, and increase patient satisfaction and engagement in healthcare decisions.

Night at the Aquarium Set for Feb. 7

Medical staff members and their families are invited to a Night at the Aquarium, a dinner and sleepover at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, on Saturday, Feb. 7, starting at 7 p.m.

Eat dinner in the shadow of a life-size blue whale replica, experience aquatic exhibits and interactive entertainment, and watch aquarium staff feed the seals and sea lions their breakfast.

Pack sleeping bags, blankets, pillows and air mattresses (no tents). Dinner, exhibits and entertainment are included, as is a continental breakfast Sunday morning.

Cost is $60 per adult and $45 per child age 3-11. The cost for those who don't spend the night is $50 per adult and $25 per child age 3-11. Parking is $8 per car.

Contact Cheryl Verne in the office of Marjorie Santore Besson at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org to reserve tickets.

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 204 people in November.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Gabrielle L. Adem, RN
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Sonu S. Ahluwalia, MD
  • Simon P. Alarcon
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Bethel V. Alvaro, RN
  • Michelle Amarillas, RN, CEN, MICN
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Mahul B. Amin, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • John P. Andreas
  • Ellen Anifantis, LCSW
  • Jisha Antony, RN
  • M. William Audeh, MD
  • David Austin, MD
  • Walid S. Ayoub, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Todd Alan Barrett, MD
  • Julie M. Beckett, RN
  • Donna M. Bias, BSN, RN
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • David William Bliss, MD
  • Vivien S. Bonert, MD
  • Swaraj Bose, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Cheryl G. Charles, MD
  • Vera M. Chesnokova, PhD
  • Arthur K. Cho, MD
  • Sonja M. Clayton
  • Jennifer Clemens
  • Hart C. Cohen, MD
  • Jason S. Cohen, MD
  • Felice E. Cooperman
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Maria S. Corral
  • Ruth Cousineau, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Debbie C. Cruz
  • Shaun S. Daneshrad, MD
  • Maria A. de Castro, MD
  • Laura Deary
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Anuj B. Desai, MD
  • Stephen C. Deutsch, MD
  • Jenifer Diorio, BSN, RN, PHN
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Julie A. Dunhill, MD
  • Joshua D. Ellenhorn, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Claudia Espinoza
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Stephanie Farrant, RN
  • Joel D. Feinstein, MD
  • Laura A. Fellman, RN
  • Morton H. Field, MD
  • Eugene L. Fishman, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Philip K. Frykman, MD, PhD
  • Steven S. Galen, MD
  • Ruchira Garg, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Eli Ginsburg, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Jay Goldberg, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Abe Green, MD
  • Rafael O. Grefaldeo
  • Karla J. Gregg, RN
  • Christian Guevara
  • Kapil Gupta, MD
  • Victor Gura, MD
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Randy S. Harris, MD
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Allen S. Ho, MD
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Danilo M. Jacinto
  • Marney Jakubowicz, LVN
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Elizabeth B. Kelly, RN
  • Irene Kim, MD
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Keith J. Kimble, MD
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Lester D. Klein
  • Robert Koblin, MD
  • Ryan H. Kotton, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Marcella D. Kurtzman, RN, OCN
  • Stuart H. Kuschner, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Caroline E. Leongas, RN
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Richard A. Lewis, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Marc Makhani, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Cindy Margolis, RN
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Nathan J. McNeil, MD
  • Farhad Melamed, MD
  • Adolfo Melendez
  • Leslie Memsic, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Charles N. Moon, MD
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Mary C. Nasmyth, MD
  • Youram Nassir, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Michelle Nealey
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Kenith K. Paresa, MD
  • Chirag G. Patil, MD
  • Debbie Y. Patterson
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Terry E. Podell, MD
  • Julie Pomeroy
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • David B. Pregerson, MD
  • Shervin Rabizadeh, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Jeffrey Rapp, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Monique Renick, RN
  • Richelle C. Robateau
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Gary G. Rosengarten, PhD
  • Warren L. Roston, MD
  • Jason A. Rothbart, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Norma E. Ruiz
  • Sulagna C. Saitta, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Rafael A. Sanchez
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Mary E. Sepulveda
  • Payam Shadi, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Melanie Sheeter
  • Stephen L. Shiao, MD, PhD
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Stuart L. Silverman, MD
  • R. Kendrick "Ken" Slate, MD
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Stacey Smyth
  • Marilyn A. Solsky, MD
  • Harmik J. Soukiasian, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Jay J. Stein, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Sandra Elaine Sternberg
  • Colin Stokol, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD
  • Pamela J. Swan
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • Michele Tagliati, MD
  • Mona Talreja
  • Jane Tavyev Asher, MD
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Hitoshi "Tommy" Tomizawa, MD, MPH
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Alfredo Valenzuela
  • Jamie S. Vitale, BSN, RN
  • Raquel G. Vivanco, RN
  • Willis Wagner, MD
  • Mary Lynn Walker, BSN, RN
  • Judith G. Weiner, MD
  • Janet Y. White, MD
  • Elizabeth Whiting, MSN, RN
  • Kenyetta Wilson
  • Charles L. Wiseman, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Rachel Zabner, MD
  • Evan M. Zahn, MD

Recognition for Alban, Gordon, McAlpin, Puri

Physician News

Alban Wins Poster Award at American College of Surgeons Meeting

Rodrigo Alban, MD, won a "poster of exceptional merit" award at the annual meeting of the American College of Surgeons held in October in San Francisco. Out of more than 300 submissions, nine were selected for the award.

The title of the poster is "Implementation of Collaborative Practice Processes Increase Donation After Circulatory Death in a Level I Trauma Center."

Alban, a trauma and acute care surgeon, is associate program director of the General Surgery Residency and associate director of Surgical Performance Improvement.

To see the award-winning poster, click the PDF link below.

Rodrigo Alban, MD, Poster (PDF)


Leo Gordon, MD, at Rice University

Gordon Delivers Keynote Address to Herb Fred Society

Leo Gordon, MD, attending surgeon at Cedars-Sinai, delivered the keynote address at the annual meeting of the Herb Fred Society on Sept. 29 in Houston.

The Herb Fred Society was established by former residents, associates and friends of Herb Fred, MD, a legendary Texas medical educator. The event took place at the Rice University football stadium overlooking the playing field.

Gordon described Cedars-Sinai, its history and its evolution into a premier medical center. He also reviewed Fred's many contributions to medical education and the medical literature. Fred and Gordon share the belief that medical history should be incorporated into every medical education program.

Gordon's formal remarks — "Hail to the Chief Complaint!" — outlined the health problems of seven former presidents.


Asha Puri, MD

Columbus McCalpin, MD

Benjamin Kagan Society Inducts Puri, McCalpin

Asha Puri, MD, and the late Columbus McCalpin, MD, have been inducted into the Benjamin Kagan Society for going above and beyond their positions in leadership, teaching and research in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Pediatrics.

Puri has been in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, for more than 30 years. She is associate clinical director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. "She has been a marvelous teacher to many decades of medical students and residents and has published articles improving the care given to the high-risk premature infant," said Gerald Whitman, MD, chair of the society's nominating committee.

McCalpin, a former chief of Pediatric Surgery, was "a fantastically friendly and engaging person as well as a dedicated and wonderful pediatric surgeon," Whitman said.