Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF March 28, 2014 | Archived Issues

Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - March 2014 (PDF)


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue. Click here to email us your milestones and comments.

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Flu 'Badge Buddies' Can Be Removed March 31

Thank you for all the efforts this winter season helping keep our patients, visitors and fellow staff safe. Beginning Monday, March 31, the medical center will no longer require the green and orange flu ID badge accessories to be worn. In addition, unvaccinated personnel will no longer have to wear isolation masks.

» Read more

CS-Link Raises the Flag on Advance Care Planning

Does your patient have a life expectancy of less than six months? If so, physicians are now required to attempt to have a conversation on advance care planning and end-of-life wishes, and to document the conversations in CS-Link™. A new CS-Link alert will display if a patient diagnosed with a terminal disease or disorder does not have an advance care plan on file.

» Read more

New Alert System Sees Small Changes in Vital Signs

MEWS Is Designed to Help Detect Clinical Deterioration More Quickly

A new system designed to identify at-risk patients by detecting subtle changes in vital signs is being evaluated in the Med-Surg units starting this month.

» Read more

Recognition for Black, Kim, Shah, Wang

Physician News

A study led by Keith Black, MD, has received a grant from an air quality district; Hyung Lae Kim, MD, led a published study on a cancer vaccine; Prediman K. Shah, MD, has received an award from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography; and Shaomei Wang, MD, PhD, led a published study on possible indicators of Alzheimer's disease.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Quickly See Patient Classification

To quickly view a patient's hospital classification in CS-Link™, you can add a column called "Class" to his or her "My Patient List."

» Read more

Here Is Your Chance to Honor a Deserving Nurse

Online nominations for the 2014 Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award for eligible nurses are being accepted now through Friday, April 11.

» Read more

MD/RN Survey Ends; Drawing Winners Named

Thanks to all of our physicians who completed the 2014 MD/RN Satisfaction Survey. More than 500 physicians and 1,200 nurses participated in the online survey. As part of the survey, six winners were selected in a drawing, and each will receive a lunch certificate for two at a local restaurant.

» Read more

Lab Information System to Close for 90 Minutes

The Cedars-Sinai laboratory information system, Sunquest, will be down for an upgrade on Sunday, April 6, from 1-2:30 a.m. During this 90-minute period, lab results will not be available online. To get lab results during this time, please call Laboratory Customer Services at 310-423-5431 for a verbal report.

» Read more

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event. The debate will convene for its 11th year on Friday, June 6.


 

» Read more

Panel Aims to Ensure Appropriate Cancer Care

Physician Education Part of Mission for Cancer Quality Committee

Since its launch in January 2012, the Cancer Quality Committee has provided leadership and oversight of the quality of clinical care, safety and satisfaction for patients with cancer. After the Dartmouth Atlas Report identified Cedars-Sinai as an outlier in several cancer metrics, the committee's work became more challenging and fell under more public scrutiny.

» Read more

Scorpion Venom, Laser Help Illuminate Tumors

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery have developed a unique, compact, relatively inexpensive imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors and other cancers. It uses a synthetic version of a particle found in scorpion venom, along with a laser that makes tumor cells "glow."

» Read more

Flu 'Badge Buddies' Can Be Removed March 31

Thank you for all the efforts this winter season helping keep our patients, visitors and fellow staff safe.

Beginning Monday, March 31, the medical center will no longer require the green and orange flu ID badge accessories to be worn. In addition, unvaccinated personnel will no longer have to wear isolation masks.

Badges should be discarded in a blue recycling bin or a regular trash container as they cannot be used again next season.

Influenza activity in Los Angeles County continues to decline, with a positive influenza rate of only 2.9 percent being reported by area laboratories to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health as of March 14. At the peak of the season, an estimated 27 percent of people admitted to Los Angeles County emergency departments with influenza-like illness tested positive for the flu.

Typically, influenza season begins in the fall and ends March 31, and this year appears to be no exception, according to the Department of Public Health.

CS-Link Raises the Flag on Advance Care Planning

Does your patient have a life expectancy of less than six months? If so, under the new medical staff standards, physicians are required to attempt to have a conversation on advance care planning and end-of-life wishes, and to document the conversations in CS-Link™ to make the information easily accessible to all healthcare providers, including specialists.

These medical staff standards were developed by a Cedars-Sinai Medicine team led by Isabel Pedraza, MD.

To make this easier, a new CS-Link alert will display if a patient diagnosed with a terminal disease or disorder does not have an advance care plan on file. The alert will not be displayed if the patient has an advance directive.

Current active conditions including cancer, congestive heart failure, liver disease or failure, transplant, dementia and severe pulmonary disease such as COPD will trigger this alert to make physicians aware of the need for advance care planning.

"Too few of our terminally ill patients have their goals of care, values and wishes recorded," said Glenn Braunstein, MD, vice president of Clinical Innovation. "Unfortunately, it is often left to the house staff or ICU faculty to have that conversation, which is less than ideal, since the patient and family may have just met the doctor or doctors.

"It would be much better if the physician with a long-term relationship with the patient had that difficult but necessary conversation in the ambulatory setting before the patient ever becomes an inpatient."

Pedraza agreed. "Though this can be a difficult topic to discuss with patients, initiating this conversation can be beneficial to the physician-patient relationship," she said. "Research has shown that advance care planning is associated with greater patient satisfaction with their personal physician, and this effect is substantial and long lasting. Advance care planning is also associated with less stress and anxiety for patients with chronic illnesses and their families, and can help ease the burden of dealing with a chronic disease."

CS-Link features a template that allows you to more easily document this information. To access this template, please follow these steps:

  • In the patient header on the patient's electronic chart, check to see if the patient has an advance directive on file with Cedars-Sinai.
  • If nothing is flagged, go to "More Activities," then click on "FYI" to add the Advance Directive Planning Flag.
  • Type "adv" in the text box to fill in the Advance Care Planning SmartText.
  • The new FYI displays in the patient header as an Active FYI. Click on the Advance Directive column to see the note. (The Advance Directive FYI may not show up if multiple FYIs are present; using the mouse, place the cursor arrow over the Active FYIs to see them all.)

Once it is documented in the FYI, this conversation will be found in a standardized place in CS-Link, and the FYI note will be seen if a clinician clicks on the Adv Dir column on the patient header.

For more information on this feature, please contact Braunstein at glenn.braunstein@cshs.org.

An alert similar to this will display in CS-Link if a patient diagnosed with a terminal disease or disorder does not have an advance care plan on file.

New Alert System Sees Small Changes in Vital Signs

A new system designed to identify at-risk patients by detecting subtle changes in vital signs is being evaluated in the Med-Surg units starting this month.

The Modified Early Warning System (MEWS) is being implemented as a test of change on 4 Northwest, 5 Southeast and 7 North; it is expected to go live in Med-Surg this summer. This initiative is being sponsored by the Cedars-Sinai Medicine Best Practice Team and Department of Nursing.

MEWS is not specific to a diagnosis or a clinical condition, and it uses an algorithm that calculates a score based on five widely measured clinical parameters: heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation in the blood.

Higher scores are associated with more serious clinical changes (see table below). Cedars-Sinai is using the ability of CS-Link™ to calculate the MEWS score automatically when vital signs are uploaded to the electronic medical record.

Elevated MEWS scores will trigger CS-Link alerts to nursing staff. Moderately elevated scores beginning at 3 will prompt more frequent monitoring of vital signs. At scores of 4-5, interventions include notifying the primary care physician. At 6, a Rapid Response Team (RRT) is alerted.

MEWS has been used successfully by other healthcare organizations to help identify patients beginning to fail due to a variety of medical conditions, including sepsis.

MEWS will be employed initially at Cedars-Sinai as a tool to help decrease mortality in septic inpatients by calling attention to subtle changes in vital signs that can help prompt early intervention, such as more frequent monitoring, fluid resuscitation, timely ordering and administration of antibiotics, ordering of lab tests, assessment by a crisis nurse and calling an RRT.

In addition to using CS-Link technology to calculate the MEWS score, CS-Link will provide alerts for interventions based on the MEWS score and will prompt use of the sepsis order set.

Sepsis has been ranked as the 10th-leading cause of death in the U.S. "Time is of the essence, particularly when treating patients with sepsis," said Jonathan Grein, MD, associate director of Hospital Epidemiology and a Cedars-Sinai Medicine champion of the MEWS project along with Peachy Hain, RN, director of Medical-Surgical Rehabilitation. "Mortality increases significantly with every hour of delay, so it's important to begin treatment at the onset of infection."

In addition to improved mortality rates, other potential benefits of MEWS include decreased morbidity, reduced transfers to the ICU and earlier use of crisis nurses for assessment. While the number of RRTs is not expected to increase, it is expected that the timing of the RRT might result in earlier requests for evaluation in hopes of more rapid intervention and stabilization.

MEWS is intended for evaluation of adult patients only (18 or older) and will not be used in the Emergency Department, ICUs or Ob-Gyn, or for patients receiving comfort care.

Recognition for Black, Kim, Shah, Wang

Physician News

Air District Awards Grant to Pollution Study Led by Black

Researchers at the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai will conduct a study to determine if several potentially toxic compounds that exist in polluted air are capable of entering the brain from the bloodstream and causing brain cancer.

The research, funded by a grant from the Brain & Lung Tumor and Air Pollution Foundation for the South Coast Air Quality Management District, will be done in laboratory mice.

The principal investigator is Keith L. Black, MD, chair and professor of the Department of Neurosurgery, director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, director of the Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. Brain Tumor Center and the Ruth and Lawrence Harvey Chair in Neuroscience.

The National Toxicology Program, an interagency program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Institute of Environmental Health Services, part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified 13 chemicals that have caused brain tumors. The Cedars-Sinai study will focus on three – naphthalene, butadiene and isoprene – that often are associated with polluted air.


Kim Leads Study Turning Tumors Into Their Own Vaccines

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute eradicated solid tumors in laboratory mice using a novel combination of two targeted agents. These two synergistic therapies stimulate an immune response, ultimately allowing solid tumors to act as their own cancer-fighting vaccine.

The lead author of the study was Hyung Lae Kim, MD, co-medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program.

The study's findings, published in the journal Cancer Research, are the first to use these combined agents as an immune stimulator and may have the potential to kill cancerous cells in solid tumors, including some of the most aggressive cancers that form in the lung and pancreas. Investigators hope to bring this science to early-phase clinical trials in coming months.

"Instead of administering a cancer vaccine to destroy tumors, we hope to modify the immune system to allow the patient's own tumor to act as a cancer vaccine," Kim said. "This approach differs from traditional methods, where the immune system is stimulated by administering a vaccine."

Among the other investigators involved in the study were Robert Figlin, MD, deputy director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Yanping Wang, MD.


Computed Tomography Society Honors Shah

Prediman K. Shah, MD, director of the Oppenheimer Atherosclerosis Research Center and the Atherosclerosis Prevention and Treatment Center, has received the Arthur S. Agatston Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Award from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

The award, which honors pioneering efforts toward preventing coronary artery disease, recognized Shah for his lifelong contributions. In particular, the organization cited his leading research in understanding atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation — the processes that lead to clogged arteries, heart attacks and stroke.

Shah, professor of Medicine and Cardiology and the Shapell and Webb Family Chair in Clinical Cardiology, will receive the award July 11 in San Diego at the society’s annual scientific meeting.


Wang Leads Study on Alzheimer's Indicators in the Eye 

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute have discovered eye abnormalities that may help reveal features of early-stage Alzheimer's disease. Using a laboratory rat model of Alzheimer's disease and high-resolution imaging techniques, researchers correlated variations of the eye structure, to identify initial indicators of the disease.

The lead author of the study was Shaomei Wang, MD, PhD, an associate professor in the Regenerative Medicine Institute and Department of Biomedical Sciences. The findings were published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

Using both animal models and postmortem human retinas from donors with Alzheimer's disease, researchers found changes in the retinal pigment epithelial layer, which harbors the supportive cells located in the back of the eye, and in the thickness of the choroidal layer that has blood vessels providing nutrients to the retina. Changes in these two regions were detected using sophisticated, state-of-the-art imaging and immunological techniques.

With high-resolution, microscopic imaging and visual acuity measurements, investigators were able to monitor tissue degeneration in the cell layer and vascular layer at the back of the eye, as well as decline in visual function, that were strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Among the other investigators involved in the study was Bin Lu, MD, PhD.

CS-Link Tip: Quickly See Patient Classification

To quickly view a patient's hospital classification in CS-Link™, you can add a column called "Class" to his or her "My Patient List."

Right-click on the current My Patient List, click Properties, identify Class as an available column and add it to your already-selected columns. This will allow you to identify at a glance if your patients have observation (OBS) or inpatient (IP) status.

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians.

Here Is Your Chance to Honor a Deserving Nurse

Online nominations for the 2014 Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award for eligible nurses are being accepted now through Friday, April 11.

This annual award is given on behalf of the medical staff to a Cedars-Sinai nurse who exemplifies professionalism, clinical excellence and caring. Originally known as the Excellence in Caring Award, it was renamed in 2005 in honor of the late Maggie Stempson-Carter, RN, who received the award in 2004.

Click here to submit a nomination on the Intranet. Only medical staff members may submit a nomination.

The award recipient will be selected by the Excellence in Caring Award Medical Staff Selection Committee and will be honored at the Nurses Week awards ceremony on May 7.

If you submitted a nomination last year and would like your nominee to be considered for this year's award, please contact Chris Ng, MD, chief of staff and co-chair of the MD/RN Collaborative, at chris.ng@cshs.org or 310-423-4700.

MD/RN Survey Ends; Drawing Winners Named

Thanks to all of our physicians who completed the 2014 MD/RN Satisfaction Survey. More than 500 physicians and 1,200 nurses participated in the online survey, which was held Feb. 17 to March 14.

As part of the survey, six winners were selected in a drawing, and each will receive a lunch certificate for two at a local restaurant. The winners are:

  • Robert T. Coles, MD
  • Allen Kamrava, MD
  • Avinash Mondkar, MD
  • Jan Simons, RN, CN III
  • Ana Maricel Cruz, RN, CN III
  • Cheryl Guzinski, RN, case manager

"We would like to extend a special thanks to all of our unit MD and RN champions who helped make the survey a success," said Chief of Staff Chris Ng, MD, who co-chairs the MD/RN Collaborative with Peachy Hain, RN, director of Medical-Surgical Rehabilitation. "We will communicate the unit-level results to our champions once they are available, so look for more survey updates in future issues."

Lab Information System to Close for 90 Minutes

The Cedars-Sinai laboratory information system, Sunquest, will be down for an upgrade on Sunday, April 6, from 1-2:30 a.m.

During this brief, 90-minute period, lab results will not be available online. To get lab results during this time, please call Laboratory Customer Services at 310-423-5431 for a verbal report.

All results with critical values will continue to be called immediately to the designated nursing unit.

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Leon Morgenstern, MD

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event.

The debate will convene for its 11th year on Friday, June 6, at 8 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium. It will anchor the first Cedars-Sinai Founder's Day – a daylong celebration of the opening of the medical center on June 6, 1976.

Topics for the debate should appeal to a wide cross section of the medical center. Send suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, at leo.gordon@cshs.org. Residents interested in participating in the debate should contact Gordon.

There are cash prizes for:

  • The resident who submits the selected topic
  • The resident who wins the debate
  • The resident who is the runner-up

To see coverage of last year's debate, click here.

Panel Aims to Ensure Appropriate Cancer Care

Since its launch in January 2012, the Cancer Quality Committee (CQC) has provided leadership and oversight of the quality of clinical care, safety and satisfaction for patients with cancer.

After the Dartmouth Atlas Report identified Cedars-Sinai as an outlier in several cancer metrics, the committee's work became more challenging and fell under more public scrutiny as the healthcare environment focuses on quality and value in cancer care.

Cancer Quality Goals and Initiatives

For 2014, the CQC's goals include:

  • Reducing chemotherapy within 14 days of end of life
  • Reducing ICU admissions of cancer inpatients during the last 30 days of life
  • Reviewing preventable medication errors
  • Increasing accuracy and compliance regarding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors
  • Monitoring the evidence-based, national quality metrics adopted by each cancer program

Chair 
Zuri Akida Murrell, MD

Vice Chair 
Beth Y. Karlan, MD

About the Committee

The Cancer Quality Committee is a subcommittee of the Cancer Committee. It is made up of cancer program leadership as well as representatives from Medical Affairs, Imaging, Pathology, Pharmacy Services, the Cancer Registry, the Department of Nursing and administration.

Its chair is Zuri Akida Murrell, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Colorectal Cancer Center. He is also vice chair of the Cancer Committee.

The Cancer Committee chair and vice chair of the Cancer Quality Committee is Beth Y. Karlan, MD, director of the Women's Cancer Program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and director of the Gilda Radner Hereditary Cancer Program.

Most recently, the CQC in collaboration with Cedars-Sinai Pharmacy Services has led efforts to require patient performance status be evaluated and documented based on criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) for all chemotherapy orders. This helps assess the appropriateness of chemotherapy for each patient.

It is recommended that cancer therapy not be administered for solid-tumor patients with all of these characteristics:

  • Poor performance status (3 or 4 on the ECOG scale)
  • No benefit from prior evidence-based interventions
  • Not eligible for a clinical trial
  • No strong evidence supporting the clinical value of further anti-cancer treatment

This recommendation is consistent with the Choosing Wisely® initiative — a program of 120 evidence-based recommendations from the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation — and with the number one recommendation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Physician Education Letters

The CQC reviews cases of patients who either received chemotherapy in the last 14 days of life or had an ICU admission during the last 30 days of life. For cases that the committee agrees are outliers of the National Quality Forum metrics, educational letters are sent to all physicians involved in the care of these cancer inpatients and to their department chairs.

The first six months are educational and don't go onto the physician's file. Repeat offenders are sent to medical staff peer review. The committee offers physicians the opportunity to respond to the letters.

"These quality metrics are being studied at hospitals across the nation, and we are being evaluated against other hospitals," said Zuri Akida Murrell, MD, chair of the CQC. "Soon they could become publicly available at the physician level. The successful implementation of these initiatives to meet these quality metrics will help us not only increase quality of care for our patients but will reflect our superior care in our physician report card when it becomes available."

If you have questions regarding the Cancer Quality Committee or would like to become involved, contact Murrell or Beth Karlan, MD, vice chair, at 310-423-8051 or cynthia.chavira@cshs.org.

Scorpion Venom, Laser Help Illuminate Tumors

Tumor tissue in the brain of a laboratory mouse glows bluish-green after an injection of Tumor Paint BLZ-100 and illumination by a camera designed and developed at Cedars-Sinai. At left is a composite of visible light and near-infrared fluorescence. At right is the fluorescence alone. The camera is pictured below.

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute and Department of Neurosurgery have developed a unique, compact, relatively inexpensive imaging device to "light up" malignant brain tumors and other cancers.

The experimental system consists of a special camera designed and developed at Cedars-Sinai and a new, targeted imaging agent based on a synthetic version of a small protein — a peptide — found in the venom of the deathstalker scorpion. The imaging agent, Tumor Paint BLZ-100, a product of Blaze Bioscience Inc., homes in on brain tumor cells. When stimulated by a laser in the near-infrared part of the spectrum, it emits a glow that is invisible to the eye but can be captured by the camera.

Results of animal studies, published as the feature article in the February issue of Neurosurgical Focus, provide the basis for the launch of human clinical trials. The system would be used during surgery to determine if it enables neurosurgeons to remove more tumor and spare more healthy tissue.

Malignant brain tumors called gliomas are among the most lethal tumors, with patients typically surviving about 15 months after diagnosis. "We know that survival statistics increase if we can remove all of a tumor, but it is impossible to visualize with the naked eye where tumor stops and brain tissue starts, and current imaging systems don't provide a definitive view," said Keith Black, MD, chair and professor of the Department of Neurosurgery, the article's senior author.

"Gliomas have tentacles that invade normal tissue and present big challenges for neurosurgeons: Taking out too much normal brain tissue can have catastrophic consequences, but stopping short of total removal gives remaining cancer cells a head start on growing back. That's why we have worked to develop imaging systems that will provide a clear distinction — during surgery — between diseased tissue and normal brain," said Black, director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, director of the Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. Brain Tumor Center and the Ruth and Lawrence Harvey Chair in Neuroscience.

In studies in laboratory mice with implanted human brain tumors, the new device clearly delineated tumor tissue from normal brain tissue. Also, with near-infrared light's ability to penetrate deep into the tissue, the system identified tumors that had migrated away from the main tumor and otherwise would have evaded detection.

Pramod Butte, MBBS, PhD, research scientist and assistant professor in the Department of Neurosurgery, the article's first author, said the tumor-imaging process consists of two parts: deploying a fluorescent "dye" that sticks only to cancer cells, and using a laser and a special camera to make an invisible image visible.

To get the dye to the tumor, it is linked to a peptide called chlorotoxin, which despite its name is not toxic. It ignores normal tissue but seeks out and binds to a variety of malignant tumor cells. It first was derived from the venom of the yellow Israeli scorpion, also called the deathstalker. Article co-author Adam Mamelak, MD, professor of neurosurgery and director of functional neurosurgery, has studied the synthetic version of chlorotoxin and its tumor-targeting properties for more than a decade.

In this study, chlorotoxin was bonded to a molecule, indocyanine green, a near-infrared dye, a version of which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The chlorotoxin-indocyanine green combination — Tumor Paint BLZ-100 — emits a glow when stimulated by near-infrared light.

"Injected intravenously, the chlorotoxin seeks out the brain tumor, carrying with it indocyanine green, which has been used in a variety of medical imaging applications. When we shine a near-infrared laser on the tissue, the tumor glows. But the glow emitted by the tumor is invisible to the human eye," said Butte, whose MBBS is India's equivalent of an MD. The camera device, designed in Butte's lab, solves this problem by capturing two images and combining them on a high-definition monitor.

Authors of the article besides Butte, Mamelak and Black are Julia Parrish-Novak, PhD, Doniel Drazin, MD, Faris Shweikeh, BS, Pallavi R. Gangalum, PhD, Alexandra Chesnokova, MD, and Julia Y. Ljubimova, MD, PhD.

Stacy Hansen and Disha Sahetya from Blaze Bioscience Inc., Seattle, provided the BLZ-100 samples.

The study was internally funded by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery. Mamelak has ownership in Teal Light Surgical. Parrish-Novak is an employee of Blaze Bioscience Inc.

An editorial accompanying the article can be found here.