Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF April 24, 2015 | Archived Issues

Recognition for Chugh, Karlan, Shah, Siegel, Rosen, Makoff, Barrett

Physician News

Sumeet Chugh, MD, Beth Y. Karlan, MD, P.K. Shah, MD, and Robert J. Siegel, MD, received honors and awards from top professional organizations, and speaking at a recent palliative care conference were Bradley T. Rosen, MD, Eve Makoff, MD, and Todd Barrett, MD.

» Read more


April 24 March to Disrupt Traffic at 6500 Wilshire

The annual march protesting the Armenian genocide will take place Friday, April 24. The march will end around noon with a demonstration outside the Turkish Consulate, 6300 Wilshire Blvd. The demonstration will continue into the early evening.

Because 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the genocide's beginning, traffic, parking and Cedars-Sinai shuttle service at 6500 Wilshire are likely to be affected more than in past years. The shuttles' pickup and dropoff point until 7 p.m. that day will be moved to the Big 5 store at 6601 Wilshire.

Shuttle service to other areas may be disrupted as well. Roads will be closed because of the march, which is expected to draw 15,000 people.


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - April 2015 (PDF)


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue. Click here to email us your milestones and comments.

CS-Link Enhancements Coming April 25

New features and functionality will be made to CS-Link™ in the early of hours of Saturday, April 25. However, you will not see a significant amount of change in your day-to-day workflows or screens.

» Read more

New Department Will Transform Patient Transport

A new department at Cedars-Sinai will significantly improve the way some patients are transported throughout the medical center and will help decrease delays and wait times. Known as Central Transportation Services, it will make its debut April 25 to coincide with the CS-Link™ upgrade.

» Read more

CS-Link Upgrade: Patients Able to Share Health Data With Providers

With the April 25 upgrade, current users of My CS-Link™ will have the ability to start syncing data from their personal health devices with My CS-Link.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Learn More About April 25 Upgrade

CS-Link™ will be upgraded Saturday, April 25. There are several ways to learn about the improvements in the upgrade.

» Read more

Yom Ha'Shoah Ceremony Honors 6 Million Lives

Some participants in Cedars-Sinai's 31st annual Yom Ha'Shoah program April 20 lived through the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps, while others lost family members and friends. Holocaust Remembrance Day attendees also included children of survivors. Early in the ceremony in Harvey Morse Auditorium, Holocaust survivors lit six candles honoring the 6 million Jews exterminated in the camps.

» Read more

Ceremony Commemorates Armenian Genocide

More than 100 people attended an emotional and educational ceremony on April 16 commemorating the centennial of the Armenian genocide. The event in the chapel was a time of remembrance and fellowship.
 

» Read more

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event. The debate will convene for its 12th year on Friday, June 5, at 8 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

 

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Co-Hosts 'Jewish Wisdom' Week

Rabbis, physicians, scholars, musicians, artists and others will share insights related to Judaism, health and healing during more than 90 free community events planned for the weeklong "Jewish Wisdom & Wellness: a Festival of Learning" co-hosted by Cedars-Sinai. Events run from April 26-May 3.

» Read more

Coming This Summer: Fireworks, Sand 'N' Snore

Summer has a couple of treats in store for medical staff members and their families: Independence Day fireworks and Smokey Robinson at the Hollywood Bowl on July 2, and Sand 'N' Snore on Sept. 11.
 

» Read more

FDA Changes Labels of Epivir, Ziagen

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved changes in the labels of Epivir and Ziagen.

» Read more

CS-Link Enhancements Coming April 25

New features and functionality will be made to CS-Link™ in the early of hours of Saturday, April 25.

However, you will not see a significant amount of change in your day-to-day workflows or screens. Following are just a few of the enhancements that you can look forward to:

  • Chart search toolbar
  • Multiple personalized order sets
  • Speed button functionality
  • InBasket email reminders

The CS-Link upgrade will require minimal training. However, so that you know what to expect, please view the job aids on CS-Link Central or read the CS-Link Tip in this week's issue of Pulse. 

As part of the upgrade process, you will not be able to create or edit Preference Lists, SmartPhrases, SmartTexts, Macros or InBasket Quick Actions from now through April 26. If you attempt to do so, you will get an error message. You will, however, be able to use your current records.

Finally, this upgrade will require a downtime. CS-Link users will need to log off of the system for approximately four hours beginning April 25 at 1 a.m. and follow downtime procedures. Any orders that cannot be deferred should be placed via paper processes.

The CS-Link Shadow Read-Only SRO environment and Web/VS will be available during the downtime for easy reference to patients' allergies, medication lists, encounter histories, etc.

More details about these CS-Link enhancements are available at cslinkcentral.org.

Related stories in this issue:

CS-Link Upgrade: Patients Able to Share Health Data With Providers

CS-Link Tip: Learn More About April 25 Upgrade

New Department Will Transform Patient Transport

Domonique Jackson and Walter Munoz are among the transporters who will work throughout the medical center. The target for the new Central Transportation Services is to complete each move, on average, in less than 35 minutes.

A new department at Cedars-Sinai will significantly improve the way some patients are transported throughout the medical center and will help decrease delays and wait times. Known as Central Transportation Services, it will make its debut on April 25 to coincide with the CS-Link™ upgrade.

Both patient and nonpatient transports will be handled exclusively by Central Transportation Services. The department replaces the former system in which support personnel (Emergency Department log techs and clinical partners) were often pulled away from other assigned duties in order to transport patients, and it enables healthcare providers to spend more time on direct patient care.

Central Transportation Services is composed of Cedars-Sinai personnel who have voluntarily transferred to, or have been promoted to, the department, as well as new hires with experience in patient transportation. Services will be provided for:

  • The Emergency Department
  • Inpatient units, except Labor and Delivery, Maternal Fetal Care Unit and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
  • S. Mark Taper Foundation Imaging Center
    • Transports to and from the Emergency Department 24/7
    • Transports to and from inpatient units 11 p.m.-6 a.m.

"The addition of this department is key to enhancing our Toes Out — Toes In organizational initiative, which is focused on delivering efficient and effective patient flow throughout the medical center," said Peter Guariglia, director of Support Services. "We now have a dedicated workforce whose sole responsibility will be moving patients and select nonpatient items, such as beds, cots and some specimens, quickly and safely."

Using customized transport software in CS-Link, the new department will operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When a patient needs to be admitted, discharged or taken to another area of the medical center for diagnostics or testing, a request for transport will be placed via CS-Link.

Teams of transporters equipped with electronic devices will work throughout the medical center. The target is to complete each move, on average, in less than 35 minutes.

The rollout of the department comes after extensive study of workflows throughout the medical center at all times of day and night, said Jeffrey Deeter, vice president of Clinical Support Services.

"The goal here is for Central Transportation Services to respond to a request within 12 minutes, which is faster for the patient, and means none of the staff involved in patient care have to leave their units," Deeter said.

Under the newly centralized system, as soon as a patient leaves a room for discharge, the Environmental Services Department will be notified, and the process of cleaning the room for a new patient can begin in a timely fashion.

"We had tried a centralized transport system at Cedars-Sinai close to 20 years ago, but that was before the sophisticated technology that makes this initiative possible today," said Paige Heaphy, director of Performance Improvement. "Now, with the CS-Link Central Transport module, we're able to do it successfully."

"Planning for the Central Transportation Services Department began about three years ago and involved a highly collaborative process that coordinated input from multiple areas within the medical center," Guariglia said. Representatives from the Emergency Department, Hospital Administration, Imaging, Performance Improvement and all inpatient nursing units met regularly to structure the new department and outline its function.

"I firmly believe central transport will be an asset for our patients," said Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, vice president, Nursing, and chief nursing officer. "Thank you to those who shared their input and worked together to create a standardized transportation process."

CS-Link Upgrade: Patients Able to Share Health Data With Providers

With the April 25 upgrade, current users of My CS-Link™ will have the ability to start syncing data from their personal health devices with My CS-Link.

The following devices and apps can provide data to My CS-Link:

  • Apple Health and HealthKit: Works with multiple devices — including Apple Watch, iPhone, iPod touch, Withings devices and Nike FuelBand — that can track weight, steps, heart rate, blood oxygen levels, blood pressure and blood sugar.
  • Withings: Devices include Smart Body Analyzer, Pulse O2 and blood pressure monitor that can track weight, heart rate and blood pressure.
  • Fitbit: Devices include activity trackers and Aria Smart Scale that can track weight and steps.

Although patients will have the ability to sync and enter health data into their medical record, we are communicating to them that it does not mean their provider is reviewing this health data. It is recommended that if patients want to discuss their health information, they can do so by scheduling an appointment with their physician's office.

Related stories in this issue:

CS-Link Enhancements Coming April 25

CS-Link Tip: Learn More About April 25 Upgrade

CS-Link Tip: Learn More About April 25 Upgrade

CS-Link™ will be upgraded Saturday, April 25. There are several ways to learn about the improvements in the upgrade:

  • Visit the upgrade page at CS-Link Central.
  • Check out the e-learning modules at CS-Link Central.
  • Attend the "Coffee and Conversation" sessions in the South Mezzanine parking lot Monday-Wednesday, April 27-29, from 7:30-9 a.m.
  • Get help from the upgrade Command Center, which will be available for two weeks in ECC A-C. The Command Center's phone number is 310-248-6600.

You can schedule a training session with Lisa Masson, MD, (lisa.masson@cshs.org) or Alex Bram (alex.bram@cshs.org).

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians.

Related stories in this issue:

CS-Link Enhancements Coming April 25

CS-Link Upgrade: Patients Able to Share Health Data With Providers

Yom Ha'Shoah Ceremony Honors 6 Million Lives

Charles Selarz and Helene Rozenblat were among the Holocaust survivors who lit candles to honor the Jews killed by the Nazis.

Most were there to honor the memories of men, women and children they never knew — people who lost their lives in one of the darkest chapters in human history.

But some who participated in Cedars-Sinai's 31st annual Yom Ha'Shoah program April 20 lived through the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps, while others lost family members and friends. Holocaust Remembrance Day attendees also included children of survivors.

Early in the ceremony in Harvey Morse Auditorium, Holocaust survivors lit six candles honoring the 6 million Jews exterminated in the camps. They were introduced by Joel M. Geiderman, MD, chair of the Holocaust Remembrance Day program, co-chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine and vice chair emeritus of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Before calling the names of the survivors, Geiderman noted that he recently celebrated the 70th anniversary of his mother's liberation from the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. A number of his relatives died in the camps.

Journalist and Holocaust historian Eric Lichtblau said he was "shocked and appalled" to learn that the U.S. became a safe haven for as many as 10,000 Nazi war criminals after World War II.

"After World War II, we thought this could never happen again," Geiderman said. "Unfortunately, it has — in Cambodia, in Rwanda and in Sudan. And today in many parts of the Mideast and Africa, Christians are being targeted through death, rape and torture because of their religion.

"We in this room as citizens have the power to help put a stop to such events. This is how we can honor past victims."

The ceremony was also deeply personal for Vera Guerin, chair of Cedars-Sinai's Board of Directors. "Today my heart is with each of you who lost a loved one or friend to the Holocaust," she said in welcoming attendees. "I, too, am a child of survivors of the Holocaust, and I know the meaning all too well of 'We shall never forget.'"

Guerin stressed the importance of fighting injustice and persecution worldwide. "As we remember the suffering and courage of our people, Jews must resolve to live for the day when the world says, 'Never again,'" she said.

The keynote speaker, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and renowned Holocaust historian Eric Lichtblau, illuminated what he called a "shameful and largely unknown chapter in postwar America" in his 2014 book, The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men.

An investigative reporter for The New York Times who worked at the Los Angeles Times for a decade, Lichtblau said he was "shocked and appalled" by what he learned over three years of research about how America became a safe haven for as many as 10,000 Nazi war criminals after World War II. Some were recruited by the CIA and the FBI to spy on the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and about 1,600 were scientists brought to the U.S. to develop the technology to send astronauts to the moon ahead of the Soviets.

Lichtblau uncovered all this after gaining access to a secret government report on the Justice Department's efforts in the 1980s to identify and prosecute Nazis living in the U.S. Some had been instrumental in atrocities such as mass shootings and medical experiments on concentration camp prisoners. Although the Justice Department ended up prosecuting about 130 cases, many of the Nazis lived out their lives without being discovered or died before their cases were adjudicated.

Lichtblau's research led him to facts about survivors of the concentration camps that were as shocking to him as what he learned about Nazis in America. Hundreds of thousands of camp survivors remained in "postwar purgatory," he said. The concentration camps were converted to "displaced person camps," where thousands of Jews who had no place to go died of malnutrition and disease.

U.S. visas for Jewish refugees were severely restricted in the first few years after the war. "Most did not get that golden ticket," Lichtblau said.

Yom Ha'Shoah speakers also included Rabbi Jason Weiner, BCC, manager of the Cedars-Sinai Spiritual Care Department. He read an excerpt from Out of the Depths, an autobiography by Israel Meir Lau, one of the youngest survivors of the Buchenwald concentration camp who grew up to become chief rabbi of Israel. The ceremony concluded with Beverly Hills Synagogue Cantor Netanel Baram singing El Moleh Rachamim, a prayer of remembrance, and attendees reciting the mourner's kaddish.

This year's program honored the memory of Leon Morgenstern, MD, who led the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery to international prominence and organized the first Yom Ha'Shoah event at the medical center in 1985. Others recognized for establishing the annual program included the late Rabbi Levi Meier, PhD, and the Feintech family.

Ceremony Commemorates Armenian Genocide

George Baghdassarian, MDiv, speaks during the commemoration of the Armenian genocide.

More than 100 people attended an emotional and educational ceremony on April 16 commemorating the centennial of the Armenian genocide. The event, the first of its kind at Cedars-Sinai, was a time of remembrance and fellowship, said George Baghdassarian, MDiv, a Christian chaplain.

"This really was a good community-building event for our hospital and the Armenian staff at Cedars-Sinai," Baghdassarian said. "It brought everyone together. I have heard nothing but positive comments from attendees, many speaking to how proud they are to work at Cedars-Sinai."

The guest speaker at the event was Nora Injeyan, an expert in Armenian history.

Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and manager of the Spiritual Care Department, agreed.

"Being a Jewish hospital, we are always concerned for those who are marginalized and excluded from the mainstream," Weiner said. "We want to provide comfort for people in our community. For the hundredth anniversary of the Armenian genocide, we felt we should do something, especially considering Cedars-Sinai has a number of Armenian employees."

The ceremony in the chapel included readings, 100 seconds of silence and a talk by Nora Injeyan, an expert in Armenian history and the genocide.

The event was put together by Weiner, Lynn Kessler, PhD, heart transplant coordinator and patient liaison, Garo Harmandayan, MD, a Supportive Care Medicine physician, and Baghdassarian.

It exceeded everyone's expectations, Weiner said.

"We had no idea how many people would show up, but we certainly didn’t expect such an outpouring," he said. "Afterward, everyone was appreciative, especially our Armenian employees. Many said they felt respected. Some of our non-Armenian attendees, who came to see what the event was all about, commented that they learned a lot."

Joel Geiderman, MD, co-chair of the Cedars-Sinai Emergency Department, attended the ceremony. "Commemoration is very important, because it not only honors the victims but it comforts the successive generations and assures them that the tragedy that befell the Armenian people will never be forgotten," he said.

The genocide began April 24, 1915, when the Ottoman Empire began the killing of 1.5 million Armenians in present-day Turkey. Intellectuals, political leaders and ordinary Armenians were either killed or sent on death marches through the wilderness without food or water.

Many countries and historians have declared these acts to be genocide, and Pope Francis recently recognized the killings as such.


April 24 March to Disrupt Traffic at 6500 Wilshire

The annual march protesting the Armenian genocide will take place Friday, April 24. The march will end around noon with a demonstration outside the Turkish Consulate, 6300 Wilshire Blvd.

Because 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the genocide's beginning, traffic, parking and Cedars-Sinai shuttle service at 6500 Wilshire are likely to be affected more than in past years. The shuttles' pickup and dropoff point until 7 p.m. that day will be moved to the Big 5 store at 6601 Wilshire.

Shuttle service to other areas may be disrupted as well.

More than 15,000 demonstrators are expected. Wilshire will be closed between San Vicente and Fairfax boulevards because of the demonstration, which will continue into the early evening. Those who park at 6500 Wilshire will be directed to enter and exit via the driveway on San Vicente. Security officers will assist with the flow of traffic.

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Leon Morgenstern, MD, was the founding director of surgery for Cedars-Sinai. He died in 2012.

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event.

The debate will convene for its 12th year on Friday, June 5, at 8 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

The topic must be timely and controversial. It must appeal to a cross section of the medical center. Send suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, at leo.gordon@cshs.org. Surgical residents interested in participating in the debate should contact Gordon.

To see coverage of last year's debate, click here.

Cedars-Sinai Co-Hosts 'Jewish Wisdom' Week

Events at Cedars-Sinai

"Glass Half Full: Jewish Responses to Life's Challenges"
Sunday, April 26, 4-6 p.m., Harvey Morse Auditorium
Featuring Rabbis Zoe Klein, David Woznica, Amy Bernstein and Elazar Muskin and moderated by Rob Eshman, publisher and editor in chief of Tribe Media Corp.

"Poetic Responses: a Respite From Record Keeping, Part 1"
Tuesday, April 28, noon-1 p.m., chapel
Featuring Ronald Andiman, MD, a Cedars-Sinai neurologist, and Rabbi William Cutter, who will examine thoughts on illness and health from the world's great poets

"Genetics and Personalized Medicine in Israel and in Jewish Law"
Wednesday, April 29, noon-1 p.m., Harvey Morse Auditorium
Cedars-Sinai grand rounds featuring Rabbi Avraham Steinberg, MD, associate clinical professor of medical ethics at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem

"Poetic Responses: a Respite From Record Keeping, Part 2"
Thursday, April 30, 12:15-1 p.m., Executive Conference Room
Featuring Andiman and Cutter

Rabbis, physicians, scholars, musicians, artists and others will share insights related to Judaism, health and healing during more than 90 free community events planned for the weeklong "Jewish Wisdom & Wellness: a Festival of Learning" co-hosted by Cedars-Sinai.

The kickoff event will take place Sunday, April 26, from 4-6 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium, where four prominent Los Angeles rabbis will explore the impact of Jewish wisdom on modern life during a panel discussion. The week will conclude with a concert featuring Neshama Carlebach and Josh Nelson on Sunday, May 3, from 7-9 p.m. at Leo Baeck Temple.

Between these opening and closing events will be a series of lectures, workshops and experiential classes encompassing a broad spectrum of Jewish thought, both ancient and modern. This will be the second week of learning co-hosted by Cedars-Sinai and the Kalsman Institute on Judaism & Health, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.

Thousands are expected to attend sessions covering such varied topics as Jewish yoga, contemporary issues in bioethics, healing and spirituality, the link between volunteerism and happiness, Zumba for the Jewish soul, caregiving, wrestling with end-of-life decisions and moving through grief. Also, there will be presentations related to breast cancer survival, Alzheimer's disease, autism and chronic illness.

Cedars-Sinai also will be represented at some of the events in the community. For example, Daniel Stone, MD, MPH, MBA, and Jonas Green, MD, will participate in a panel discussion about how to have end-of-life conversations on Tuesday, April 28, at 7 p.m. at Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills.

For more information, go to jewishwisdomandwellness.org.

Jewish Wisdom and Wellness (PDF)

Coming This Summer: Fireworks, Sand 'N' Snore

Summer has a couple of treats in store for medical staff members and their families.

Hollywood Bowl Fireworks — July 2

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, along with Motown legend Smokey Robinson.

The event on Thursday, July 2, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $135 per adult and $65 per child 3-11 years of age.

Valet and Lower Terrace parking passes also are available.

A photo from the 2014 Hollywood Bowl event

Sand 'N' Snore — Sept. 11

The dinner, sleepover and breakfast starts Friday, Sept. 11. Details will be announced.

To reserve a place for either event, contact Cheryl Verne, in the office of Marjorie Santore Besson, at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

FDA Changes Labels of Epivir, Ziagen

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved revisions to the labels for Epivir (lamivudine) and Ziagen (abacavir sulfate) to provide for once-daily dosing in pediatric patients 3 months and older when used in combination with other antiretrovirals for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

For more information, click here or on the PDF links below.

Epivir package insert (PDF)

Ziagen package insert (PDF)