Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Oct. 23, 2015 | Archived Issues

Flu Shot Clinic Today

Have you received your flu shot? A vaccination clinic is scheduled for today from 8 a.m.-10 p.m. in Harvey Morse 6.

» Read more


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - October 2015 (PDF)


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue. Click here to email us your milestones and comments.

Transplant Trailblazer Named 'Pioneer'

Stanley C. Jordan

Jordan's Decision to Pursue Medicine Has Helped Many Who Need New Kidneys

Stanley C. Jordan, MD, decided to pursue medicine when he was 5. Because of his decision, highly sensitized patients worldwide have received kidney transplants, and the Kidney Transplant Program at Cedars-Sinai has become an international referral center for patients with high immunological risk. Jordan received the prestigious Pioneer in Medicine Award during the annual meeting of the medical staff Oct. 19.

» Read more

Nursing Services Leader Wins Chief of Staff Award

Peachy Hain

At Medical Staff Annual Meeting, Priselac, Ng Look to Future

Peachy Hain, MSN, RN, has dedicated herself to improving working relations between the physician and the nurse — one clinician at a time. Her efforts have paid off, and as a result of her achievements, Hain, director of Medical, Surgical and Rehabilitation Nursing Services, was honored with the 2015 Chief of Staff Award.

» Read more

Cancer Expert, Nursing Leader Earn Top Honor

Two nationally recognized leaders from Cedars-Sinai have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in healthcare. Beth Y. Karlan, MD, and Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, are among 80 new members named to the academy based on their contributions to health and medicine.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Be Specific When Storing Problems

This week's tip comes from the newest member of the physician team at Enterprise Information Services, Anil Goud, MD. When storing problems within problem lists in CS-Link™, use the calculator to drive to as much specificity as possible.

» Read more

Clinical Documentation Course Continues Nov. 3

Participants Can Earn Two Continuing Medical Education Credits

Members of the medical staff can take a "Clinical Documentation Integrity Power Course for Physicians" that meets the first Tuesday of each month through Dec. 1. The Nov. 3 session will take place in PEC 8. Participants need to attend just one session. Two continuing medical education credits will be available.

» Read more

Memorial Service for Matloff Set for Nov. 11

A memorial service for Jack Matloff, MD, the founding chair and chair emeritus of the Cedars-Sinai Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, will be held Nov. 11 from 4-6 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.



» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for September

The Circle of Friends program honored 161 people in September. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Transplant Trailblazer Named 'Pioneer'

Pioneer in Medicine 2015

"It's really a privilege to be a physician and a scientist," said Stanley C. Jordan, MD, winner of the 2015 Pioneer in Medicine Award.

Jordan's Decision to Pursue Medicine Has Helped Many Who Need New Kidneys

Stanley C. Jordan, MD, decided to pursue medicine shortly after his diagnosis with polio. He was 5.

The impetus behind his decision was simple. A healthcare provider comforted Jordan when no one else really could, and this individual's efforts left such a lasting impression on the 5-year-old from Sparta, North Carolina, that medicine became his career of choice.

Jordan received the prestigious Pioneer in Medicine Award during the annual meeting of the medical staff Oct. 19.

Even after all these years, Jordan hasn't forgotten the comforting clinician. "I felt his compassion and understanding that what I needed was to be comforted," Jordan said during a video tribute in his honor at the meeting. "Never underestimate the power of interactions you have with others."

Jordan's decision to pursue medicine has led to highly sensitized patients worldwide receiving kidney transplants, and the Kidney Transplant Program at the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center has become an international referral center for patients with high immunological risk.

Vice Chief of Staff Peggy Miles, MD, and Cynthia Nast, MD, professor of Pathology at Cedars-Sinai, introduced and presented the award to Jordan.

"Dr. Jordan is an exceptional clinician and educator who has inspired trainees and colleagues, giving hope to patients in need of kidney transplants around the world," Nast said.

Jordan, director of Nephrology and Transplant Immunology and medical director of the Kidney Transplant Program, has made paradigm-shifting discoveries in the fields of immunology and kidney transplants. He and his team pioneered the use of intravenous immunoglobulin to reduce the risk of rejection in difficult cases in which other medications have failed. He also created a technique to detect post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in its earliest stages.

In his research, Jordan continues to pursue desensitization protocols for highly HLA-sensitized patients.

Among those in the audience Oct. 19, were Jordan's wife, Susan, two of his daughters and his two grandchildren, seated with him at a table in front.

Jordan was welcomed to the podium with a standing ovation. He thanked a long list of people, including his family, his team and others at Cedars-Sinai.

"I couldn't have asked for a better life," said Jordan, who started at Cedars-Sinai in 1986.

Throughout his acceptance speech, Jordan never wavered from what has brought him this far — his devotion to comforting those in need.

"It's really a privilege to be a physician and a scientist. Medicine has changed a lot over the years, and too often we get lost in computers and algorithms," he said. "It is important we maintain compassion and the human touch."

This is Jordan's second major Cedars-Sinai award this year. In June, he received the inaugural PRISM research prize for his major contributions to the treatment and care of organ transplant patients.

Related story:

Nursing Services Leader Wins Chief of Staff Award

Nursing Services Leader Wins Chief of Staff Award

Chief of Staff Award

Peachy Hain, MSN, RN, and Chief of Staff Christopher S. Ng, MD

At Medical Staff Annual Meeting, Priselac, Ng Look to Future

Peachy Hain, MSN, RN, has dedicated herself to improving working relations between the physician and the nurse — one clinician at a time.

Her efforts have paid off. Programs such as the decades-long MD/RN Collaborative, which encourages better communication between physicians and nurses, are leading to higher job satisfaction and greater patient safety and satisfaction.

As a result of her achievements, Hain, director of Medical, Surgical and Rehabilitation Nursing Services, was honored with the 2015 Chief of Staff Award.

Chief of Staff Christopher S. Ng, MD, presented the award during a packed annual meeting of the medical staff Oct. 19 in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

"Peachy earned this award for her tireless dedication to enhancing collaboration between physicians and nurses, and for her unwavering support of the medical staff at Cedars-Sinai," said Ng, who has co-chaired the MD/RN Collaborative with Hain since 2004.

Before the award presentation, President and CEO Thomas M. Priselac praised the medical staff for its dedication and briefly outlined recent accomplishments as well as the importance of delivering quality care more efficiently. Two areas that he highlighted:

  • Cedars-Sinai as the leading hospital in the immediate community
  • The medical center as one of the nation's leading centers in caring for the most critically ill

Clement C. Yang, MD, medical staff secretary, followed with a summary of Medical Executive Committee representative assignments for 2016. Ng then introduced Yang as incoming vice chief of staff and Peggy B. Miles, MD, as the incoming chief of staff.

In his final report as chief of staff, Ng poked a little fun at some of the new ICD-10 codes and reinforced messages from Priselac on the importance of performance improvement, pursuing reductions in length of stay and readmissions, and improving clinical documentation.

Ng also mentioned a few California legislative bills that might impact clinicians in upcoming years, such as the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System and the End of Life Option Act.

He said staff should be prepared for more surveys in the coming year and to become more aware of the Quality Assurance Performance Improvement initiative from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

In closing, Ng urged physicians to:

  • Sign up for Crimson, which allows physicians to look at their performance in areas that are increasingly being reported publicly
  • Communicate with Progression of Care Rounds team
  • Join a unit-based MD/RN collaborative

Related story:

Transplant Trailblazer Named 'Pioneer'

Cancer Expert, Nursing Leader Earn Top Honor

Two nationally recognized leaders from Cedars-Sinai have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in healthcare.

Karlan Beth
Beth Y. Karlan, MD Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN

Beth Y. Karlan, MD, and Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, are among 80 new members named to the academy based on their contributions to health and medicine. The two join an organization widely recognized as a national resource for independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on health issues.

"The selection of Drs. Karlan and Burnes Bolton reflects their trailblazing work in two fields of medicine that are vital to the health of our communities," said Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and CEO. "They have much to be proud of in their elections."

Karlan, director of the Women's Cancer Program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, has devoted her career to improving the understanding and treatment of gynecologic malignancies. She has advocated nationally for greater public awareness, education and research funding in the field.

A surgeon and researcher, Karlan has focused her work on the discovery of ovarian cancer biomarkers to aid in early detection of the disease and in the identification of molecular therapies. She also studies inherited susceptibility to cancer, particularly the clinical impact of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for women's cancers.

In 2012, Karlan was appointed by the White House to the National Cancer Advisory Board, a committee that advises the National Cancer Institute. She serves as editor-in-chief of Gynecologic Oncology and Gynecologic Oncology Reports, the leading scientific journals in her field. She also serves on an Institute of Medicine committee that evaluates the state of ovarian cancer research.

At Cedars-Sinai, Karlan is director of the Gilda Radner Hereditary Cancer Program and holds the Board of Governors Chair in Gynecologic Oncology. Additionally, she is director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology.

"It's been a privilege to have had opportunities to make meaningful contributions to the field of gynecologic oncology and impact the lives of women with cancer," Karlan said. "I'm incredibly honored that my peers have recognized these contributions with my election to the National Academy of Medicine."

Burnes Bolton, vice president for Nursing and chief nursing officer, has become one of the nation's most visible and respected figures in the nursing profession. Over four decades, she has championed higher education for nurses to further professionalize the field and has worked to promote diversity and inclusion within healthcare. Her work has influenced policies at the national and international levels and has fostered lasting change in local communities.

As president of the National Black Nurses Association in the early 1990s, Burnes Bolton led a national campaign sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to improve community health by linking physicians and nurses in professional societies with neighborhoods, beauty shops and local organizations.

Burnes Bolton has played crucial leadership roles in other professional organizations and academic institutions. She chaired an advisory panel for Transforming Care at the Bedside, a national initiative that produced recommendations for empowering caregivers to generate and test new ideas for delivering safe, quality care.

She also was a principal founder and designer of the Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes, a 1996 partnership between the Association of California Nurse Leaders and the American Nurses Association-California to establish reliable indicators for evaluating the impact of nursing.

Under Burnes Bolton's leadership, Cedars-Sinai founded the Geri and Richard Brawerman Nursing Institute in 2002 to help expand the supply of skilled nurses in the Los Angeles region.

Burnes Bolton is president of the 5,000-member American Organization of Nurse Executives and a past president of the American Academy of Nursing.

"I am pleased to be recognized for my contributions to healthcare and science," she said. "The academy provides the nation with advice on important issues impacting the health of individuals, populations and communities. I look forward to contributing to this important work."

Burnes Bolton and Karlan are among 70 U.S. members elected to the academy this year. An additional 10 international members also have been elected. The new members raise the academy's total U.S. membership to 1,826. Its international roster has grown to 137 members.

CS-Link Tip: Be Specific When Storing Problems

This week's tip comes from the newest member of the physician team at Enterprise Information Services, Anil Goud, MD.

When storing problems within problem lists in CS-Link™, use the calculator to drive to as much specificity as possible. (Hint: The more digits in the actual code, the more specific the code.) This will decrease the number of times the calculator will pop up when you use the problem within the visit encounter, or at least decrease the number of options to choose from.

A great example is heart failure:

  • Heart failure — too nonspecific
  • Chronic systolic heart failure — too specific; may not cause the calculator to fire if you wanted to mention an acute component
  • Systolic heart failure — perfect; it will bring up the calculator but should only ask you to choose acuity (acute vs. chronic vs. acute-on-chronic)

For more information, visit CS-Link Central.

For ICD-10 help, email askicd10@cshs.org.

To set up individual or group training to improve your efficiency with CS-Link, email lisa.masson@cshs.org, shaun.miller@cshs.org, anil.goud@cshs.org or margaret.lozovatasky@cshs.org.

Clinical Documentation Course Continues Nov. 3

Members of the medical staff can take a "Clinical Documentation Integrity Power Course for Physicians" that meets the first Tuesday of each month  through Dec. 1. Sessions take place from 3:30-6:30 p.m. in various locations; the Nov. 3 session will take place in PEC 8. Participants need to attend just one session.

Under the Affordable Care Act, physicians will have to justify treatments and demonstrate satisfactory quality outcomes. Clinical documentation therefore will need to be accurate and timely and to reflect the scope of services provided.

Objectives of the course:

  • Explain the role of the Clinical Documentation Integrity Department at Cedars-Sinai
  • Discuss how hospitals and physicians are rated
  • Explore the DRG system and how documentation affects profiles
  • Understand the interplay among SOI, ROM, LOS and reimbursement
  • Compare ICD-9 and ICD-10 documentation requirements
  • Compare Cedars-Sinai’s score to those of similar hospitals
  • Learn definitions for common diagnoses
  • Recognize documentation that is vague and nonspecific
  • Identify documentation strategies to reflect the true severity of illness of the patient

Two continuing medical education credits will be available.

For more information, call Clinical Documentation Integrity at 310-423-3052. For a list of dates and locations, click the PDF link below.

CDI Power Course for Physicians (PDF)

Memorial Service for Matloff Set for Nov. 11

Jack Matloff, MD

A memorial service for Jack Matloff, MD, the founding chair and chair emeritus of the Cedars-Sinai Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, will be held Nov. 11 from 4-6 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

All personnel are invited to attend this event celebrating the life and legacy of Matloff, a respected teacher, pioneer and visionary in medicine and in health policy. Matloff died Aug. 20.

Matloff was recruited to Los Angeles in 1969 to develop a cardiothoracic surgery division at what was then Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. During his nearly 30 years at Cedars-Sinai, Matloff and his world-class team grew the division into one of the most highly respected centers for cardiothoracic surgery in the world, as it remains today. He and his team touched the lives of more than 10,000 patients during his tenure.

Previously in Medical Staff Pulse:

Jack Matloff, MD, Leader in Cardiothoracic Surgery (Aug. 28, 2015)

Circle of Friends Honorees for September

The Circle of Friends program honored 161 people in September.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Elham Afghani, MD
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, RN, MN, AOCN
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Babak R. Bamshad, MD
  • David Barcay, MD
  • Anat Ben-Shlomo, MD
  • Peiman Berdjis, MD
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Donna M. Bias, BSN, RN
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Kenneth Brooks, RN
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Felicia L. Cates
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Julie Choi
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Eugenio Cingolani, MD
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Jonathan Domingo
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Amanda M. Duhon
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Mariana Fayman, PA
  • Edward J. Feldman, MD
  • Brian L. Flyer, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • David M. Frisch, MD
  • Steven S. Galen, MD
  • Elayne K. Garber, MD
  • Avrom Gart, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Alexander Gershman, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Ashley Gorelik
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Leland M. Green, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Omid Hamid, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Martin L. Hopp, MD
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD
  • Lillian Y. Hsu, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Patricia A. Jenkins, RN
  • Jennifer Jones
  • Estrella Maria Jordan, RN
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Mohammad R. Khosravi, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Alex "Soo In" Kim
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • H. Phillip Koeffler, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Lyle D. Kurtz, MD
  • Sofy Landes, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD
  • Madeline S. Lerman, BSN, RN
  • Keren Lerner, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Richard A. Lewis, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Aliza A. Lifshitz, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Jonathan I. Macy, MD
  • Ali Mahtabifard, MD
  • Moody M. Makar, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • Sharron L. Mee, MD
  • Puja K. Mehta, MD
  • Richard J. Metz, MD
  • Kiarash Michel, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Franklin G. Moser, MD
  • Robert T. Naruse, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Edward Kazuhisa Nomoto, MD
  • Una O'Donovan
  • Sara Oliva, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Alice Peng, MD
  • Anne L. Peters, MD
  • Terry E. Podell, MD
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Florian Rader, MD
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Joseph R. Recinos
  • Madison F. Richardson, MD
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Gary G. Rosengarten, PhD
  • Kerry Ryan, RN
  • Justin D. Saliman, MD
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Irwin Segal
  • Scott Serden, MD
  • Alan E. Shapiro, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Sharon Sloan
  • Laura Snoussi, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Thomas P. Sokol, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Marilyn A. Solsky, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Jay J. Stein, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA
  • Eric R. Sue, MD
  • Kazu Suzuki, DPM
  • Sanjeeta Swamy
  • Andrea M. Swanson
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Leticia O. Uy, RN, OCN
  • Marina Vaysburd, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Shaomei Wang, MD, PhD
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • Tricia A. Wilson, LVN
  • Charles L. Wiseman, MD
  • Philip A. Yalowitz, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Laura S. Young