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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF December 16, 2016 | Archived Issues

Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - December 2016 (PDF)  


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue.

Submit your milestones and comments.

New Scientists and Clinicians Join Cancer Institute

The Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute is bolstering its formidable roster of physicians and researchers with the addition of four highly regarded doctors who will expand clinical and investigational options for breast cancer and prostate cancer patients.

» Read more

Priselac Speaks About Changes in Healthcare

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, visited a major Los Angeles civic organization recently and offered a glimpse of how he sees the healthcare industry evolving. Priselac spoke about rapidly advancing medical care driven by research discoveries and digital innovations, many of which already are reshaping patient care and the healthcare landscape.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 242 people in November. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS Receives $10 Million to Study Digestive Disease

Cedars-Sinai investigators in gastroenterology have been awarded $10 million by the National Institutes of Health to conclude a groundbreaking, decadeslong investigation of the genetic and immunological causes of inflammatory bowel disease.

» Read more

Researchers Win Grant to Study PAH Therapy

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This work will be supported by a recently awarded $7.3 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

» Read more

Educational Series Focuses on Gender Medicine

Despite a growing body of medical research about gender differences, studies continue to show that most healthcare providers are not being properly trained about discrepancies between the sexes and how those impact the diagnoses and treatments of patients. A lunchtime educational initiative is taking aim at the problem.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Accessing Record Locator Services

cs-link logo

CS-Link™ allows access to Surescripts' National Record Locator Services, which provides a list of healthcare facilities a patient has been seen through Care Everywhere.

» Read more

Grad School Will Offer Master's in Health Delivery

Cedars-Sinai's graduate school will expand next fall with the launch of a master's degree in health delivery science. The new program will teach students how to measure and deliver valuable healthcare. These are critical skills in managing the pressures of the marketplace, which increasingly rewards medical providers for value of care rather than volume of procedures, said program director Brennan Spiegel, MD.

» Read more

Graduate Program in Magnetic Resonance to Begin

Cedars-Sinai's graduate program at the Department of Biomedical Sciences will begin offering a master of science in magnetic resonance in medicine next fall. The program has tripled its master's degree offerings since creating the first one in biomedical science and translational medicine in 2015.

» Read more

Next Issue Will Publish Jan. 13

Because of the holiday, Medical Staff Pulse and will not publish on Friday, Dec. 30. The next issue of Pulse will come out on Jan. 13.

New Scientists and Clinicians Join Cancer Institute

The Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute is bolstering its formidable roster of physicians and researchers with the addition of four highly regarded doctors who will expand clinical and investigational options for breast cancer and prostate cancer patients.

The doctors are trailblazers in their fields, focusing on first-of-its-kind immunotherapy for breast cancer; innovations in breast-cancer radiation; genomic sequencing for personalized cancer treatment; and cancer prevention, treatment and survival, particularly among minority populations.

The newcomers also provide additional options for patients who feel more comfortable being treated by women physicians. Three of them assumed their posts in November; the fourth begins in early January.

"We're delighted to welcome these talented scientists and superb clinicians, who will have a positive impact on our patients and on the scholarly culture of the cancer institute," said Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD, director of the institute.

The doctors are:

Heather McArthur, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Breast Oncology
Staff Physician in the Division of Hematology Oncology and the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Acting Associate Professor of Medicine

McArthur, who joins Cedars-Sinai from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, is a medical oncologist with a clinical breast cancer practice. Her research focuses on innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, with a special interest in novel immune therapy strategies.

She's working on a treatment that combines cryoablation — freezing of a tumor — with immune therapy drugs that are effective in treating advanced melanoma, an aggressive skin cancer. She has been a reviewer for numerous clinical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer. She has written more than 65 articles, invited commentaries and book chapters on breast cancer.

"Breast cancer patients, who feel so vulnerable, need a special relationship with their oncologist," McArthur said. "My relationships with patients are very deep and very special. I treat them like family members."

McArthur said that she and frequent collaborator Alice Y. Ho, MD, MBA, also from Memorial Sloan Kettering, are committed to furthering the research goals in breast cancer at Cedars-Sinai.

"We are excited to build a multidisciplinary breast cancer program that's clinically oriented and connects to unique clinical trials," McArthur said.


Alice Y. Ho, MD, MBA
Staff Physician
Director of Breast Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology and Division of Hematology Oncology and the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Acting Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Medicine

Ho is a radiation oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated solely to the care of breast cancer patients. Her research is focused on radiation techniques that minimize adverse side effects from radiation and improve the quality of life in breast cancer patients who undergo reconstructive surgery. She also is developing novel radiation-and-drug treatments for women with triple-negative breast cancer and clinical trials for women with positive lymph nodes who undergo mastectomy. She has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles, reviews, commentaries, book chapters and books on breast cancer.

"We're pioneering studies in breast cancer at Cedars-Sinai. We want to use combinations of cryoablation, chemotherapy, immune therapy and radiation to see if the results are better than using any single agent alone," Ho said. "Women will be able to take advantage of helpful programs, depending on their type of breast cancer."


Reva Basho, MD
Staff Physician, Division of Hematology Oncology

Basho's interests include the development of new therapies for high-risk breast cancer that is resistant to standard therapy, particularly triple-negative breast cancer. In recent years, significant progress has been made to subdivide breast cancer into groups that may respond to certain classes of drugs. Basho, a clinical researcher who comes from the University of Texas MD Anderson Center, says she hopes to employ this knowledge to design clinical trials that test novel targeted therapies in various types of patients. She has served as first author on studies in top journals and received a 2016 Young Investigator Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

"As I continue to develop my career as a breast cancer researcher at Cedars-Sinai, I hope to bring relevant and high-impact clinical trials to patients," Basho said. "Together, we can continue to overcome the obstacles that we face in fighting breast cancer today and in the future."


Jane Figueiredo, PhD
Director, Community and Population Health Research, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Research Scientist, Division of Hematology Oncology
Acting Associate Professor of Medicine

Figueiredo's research seeks to understand how environmental and genetic factors affect the development, treatment and prevention of disease, especially among minority populations. Her studies examine risk factors and long-term outcomes for colorectal, prostate and breast cancer patients. Figueiredo, who comes from the Keck School of Medicine of USC, is looking for new biomarkers from blood, urine and stool samples to predict treatment response and likely outcomes. She also is looking at how patients' health practices influence the effectiveness and safety of treatments.

"My goal at Cedars-Sinai is to advance interdisciplinary cancer research using approaches based on samples from appropriate populations, and develop a comprehensive research program in colorectal cancer," Figueiredo said.

Priselac Speaks About Changes in Healthcare

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, visited a major Los Angeles civic organization recently and offered a glimpse of how he sees the healthcare industry evolving. Priselac spoke about rapidly advancing medical care driven by research discoveries and digital innovations, many of which already are reshaping patient care and the healthcare landscape.

Reflecting on work going on at Cedars-Sinai, Priselac told the luncheon sponsored by Town Hall of Los Angeles that breakthroughs within nanotechnology, precision medicine and regenerative medicine offer unprecedented hope for improving standards of medical care and enhancing quality of life in the coming years.

"A real challenge for those leading and working in healthcare is prioritizing and managing the volume of change that is currently going on," Priselac said during his hourlong presentation on Nov. 29. "But there is no doubt it will make American healthcare more efficient and of a higher quality."

Priselac said that progress has been fueled by the rapid development in understanding the human genome. Significant advancements are leading to new treatments that can harvest stem cells to regrow damaged tissue in multiple organs, identify blood protein markers to flag potential medical problems, and develop tools to boost the body's immune system against cancer, he said.

These research developments coincide with the rise of digital and mobile technologies that already have produced the electronic medical record and patient-friendly mobile applications like CS-Link™. The collection, storage and relatively easy retrieval of medical data has been transformative for physicians and especially for patients.

"Patients can now use this information in a way that is meaningful to them," Priselac said. "We are moving to a more customer-centered care model. It's here today and it's here to stay."

Within the next several years, digital technologies will help dramatically improve the management of chronic diseases, which are becoming increasingly common, Priselac said. Remote monitoring will aid in better tracking of patients and even help to ensure that they take their medications. The data will lead to earlier interventions if problems are detected, averting unnecessary hospitalizations.

During a question-and-answer session, Priselac was asked about rising healthcare costs in the U.S. and how they compare to the situation in leading European countries. Each national system properly reflects its own culture and economy, said Priselac, who has closely studied healthcare policy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Priselac noted one key difference: American expectations for healthcare.

"In places like Germany, broadly speaking, people don't expect to get a titanium hip so they can keep playing tennis when they are 95," Priselac said.

When asked about the recent national election and its impact on healthcare, Priselac acknowledged change is ahead, but perhaps not as dramatic as some speculate.

"What won't change is the need to make healthcare more uniformly high quality and to make it as affordable as it can possibly be," he said. "So how one administration may go about that may differ, but the goals will be the same."

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 242 people in November.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • John B. Andrews, MD
  • Jennifer T. Anger, MD, MPH
  • Alagappan Annamalai, MD
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • David Austin, MD
  • Irina Avidon, PharmD
  • Hyun W. Bae, MD
  • Mamadu Juma Bah
  • Benjamin Basseri, MD
  • Brian M. Benway, MD
  • George Berci, MD
  • Page A. Bertolotti, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Anton J. Bilchik, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Wendy Briggs
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Michelle K. Chang, PA
  • Piyaporn Chantravat, RN
  • Timothy Charlton, MD
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Sumeet S. Chugh, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • Donald S. Cohen, MD
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Martin Cooper, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Teresa M. Dean, MD
  • Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD
  • Ann S. Demaio, NNP
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Josefina B. Dy
  • Jonathan C. Ellis, MD
  • Alan Engelberg, MD
  • Anasheh Enjily
  • Shervin Eshaghian, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Joel D. Feinstein, MD
  • Joy S. Feld, MD
  • Edward J. Feldman, MD
  • Stuart G. Finder, PhD
  • Dorothy Forneris, RN
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Joyce N. Fox, MD
  • Andrew L. Freedman, MD
  • Philip K. Frykman, MD, PhD
  • Clark B. Fuller, MD
  • Srinivas Gaddam, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Irene Luna Garcia
  • Dael Geft, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Sara Ghandehari, MD
  • Ann P. Gilligan, RN
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Jamie L. Golden, RN
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Lloyd B. Greig, MD
  • Marshall L. Grode, MD
  • Kapil Gupta, MD
  • Kathryn A. Gurvitz, MHA
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • David S. Hallegua, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Donald R. Henderson, MD, MPH
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Corina Hernandez, NP
  • Allen S. Ho, MD
  • Ivan Ho, MD
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Lalima A. Hoq, MD, MPH
  • Anabel M. Hugh, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Marney Jakubowicz, LVN
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Bronwen M. Jones
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Leah N. Justus, RN
  • Sheila Kahwaty PA-C, MPAS
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Adam D. Karns, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Elizabeth M. Kim, MD
  • Howard H. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Miyun Kim, RN
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Charles F. Kivowitz, MD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Keith L. Klein, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Ryan H. Kotton, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Stuart H. Kuschner, MD
  • Barbara R. Leanse, BSW
  • Paul C. Lee, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael S. Levine, MD
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Yuliya Linhares, MD
  • Milton Little, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Mark Logan, RN
  • Victoria C. Lopez, RN
  • Jonathan I. Macy, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Eve Louise Makoff, MD
  • Harumi O. Mankarios, RN, OCN
  • Malcolm L. Margolin, MD
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • David N. Matsumura, MD
  • Julia McCaffrey
  • Alain Mita, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Liana Moskal, RN
  • Zuri Murrell, MD
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Shawn S. Nasseri, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Arthur J. Ochoa, JD
  • Alexandra O'Connor
  • Katayoun Omrani, DDS
  • Dayanara Ortega
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Michelle Otani, RN
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Pamela J. Phillips, MD
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Jon Rasak, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Ali Rezaie, MD
  • Gary Reznik, MD
  • Bobbie J. Rimel, MD
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Stacey P. Rosenbaum, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Ruth "Virginia" Russell, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Rola Saouaf, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Aamir S. Shah, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Nancy L. Sicotte, MD
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Americo Simonini, MD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • R. Kendrick "Ken" Slate, MD
  • Sharon Sloan
  • Kenneth O. Sparks, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Gayane Stepanyan, RN
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Mabel A. Stringfellow
  • Carey B. Strom, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD
  • Christina M. Sutay, RN
  • Steven Sykes, MD
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Gershom Tam, RN
  • Victor F. Tapson, MD
  • Sandra E. Thomasian, MD
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Hitoshi "Tommy" Tomizawa, MD, MPH
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Suketu B. Vaishnav, MD
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Angela Velleca, BSN, RN, CCTC
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Ronald G. Victor, MD
  • Carl Violano, MD
  • Olga Voroshilovsky, MD
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD
  • Willis Wagner, MD
  • Alan Waxman, MD
  • Alan Weinberger, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Michael H. Weisman, MD
  • Janet Y. White, MD
  • Donald A. Wiss, MD
  • Robert N. Wolfe, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Veronica T. Wootton
  • Arthur Wu, MD
  • Philip A. Yalowitz, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • John S. Yu, MD
  • Zachary Zumsteg, MD

CS Receives $10 Million to Study Digestive Disease

Cedars-Sinai investigators in gastroenterology have been awarded $10 million by the National Institutes of Health to conclude a groundbreaking, decadeslong investigation of the genetic and immunological causes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

"This is the longest IBD study of its kind funded by the NIH and the first to explore the genetic makeup of the disease," said Stephan R. Targan, MD, director of the F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai.

"Since 1992, we’ve taken an integrative approach — bringing several areas of science together — to demonstrate that this challenging disease is in fact comprised of several forms of the disease, each with a different biology," added Targan, the study’s principal investigator.

The interdisciplinary research has shown that inflammatory bowel disease is actually a spectrum of chronic illnesses that cause painful inflammation of the intestines. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the commonly recognized forms of IBD. But the disease can manifest in a variety of ways that lead to the destruction of the digestive tract, causing chronic physical, psychological and emotional problems.

A more precise diagnosis enables physicians to prescribe the most effective treatments available, tailored to each patient’s particular biological makeup.

"Using molecular signatures to identify subgroups of IBD — and taking into account a patient’s disease severity and response to treatment — is all about getting the right therapy to the right patient at the right time," said Dermot McGovern, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and director of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health.

"Work from this project is making very significant contributions to helping patients around the world. These approaches to diagnosis and treatment should be available to all sections of society, and we have been working hard to achieve those goals," said McGovern, who served as the principal investigator for the first project in the ongoing study.

David Underhill, PhD, professor of Biomedical Sciences and the Janis and William Wetsman Family Chair in Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Cedars-Sinai, also has contributed to the study by investigating how IBD might be affected by the relationship between the immune system and the fungal communities in the digestive tract.

"Examining IBD through all these various genetic and biological lenses is pointing the way to novel therapeutic approaches that could finally bring relief and healing to many patients," Targan said.

Researchers Win Grant to Study PAH Therapy

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This work will be supported by a recently awarded $7.3 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a chronic disease that is very different from, and much more dangerous than, regular hypertension. Caused by high blood pressure in the large arteries leading from the heart to the lungs, the condition affects 200,000 patients in the U.S. every year and can lead to heart failure and premature death. Symptoms include shortness of breath, dizziness and chest pain.

The new clinical study will test the safety and effectiveness of treating PAH with cells known as cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). CDCs consist of a single type of cardiac progenitor cell, and they are being studied in clinical trials at Cedars-Sinai for other types of heart disease and for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The CDCs to be used in the upcoming study are manufactured by Capricor Therapeutics Inc., which is developing this technology as its therapeutic product candidate CAP-1002.

"We have an exciting opportunity to try something new in these patients who currently have limited treatment options," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the researcher who invented and developed the CDC technology. "Our theory is that introducing these cells into the arteries leading to the lungs will reduce inflammation and, as a result, prevent permanent damage to the heart by decreasing pulmonary blood pressure."

The clinical study in PAH will be led by Michael I. Lewis, MD, director of Respiratory Therapy, and could begin enrolling patients as early as mid-2017.

In 2009, a team led by Marbán completed the world's first clinical trial of CDCs. The results, which were published in The Lancet in 2012, showed a medical first: evidence that healthy heart muscle could be therapeutically regenerated in a heart damaged by a heart attack. Since then, Marbán's research has led to several clinical trials in which heart disease patients undergo a catheter-based procedure during which they receive an infusion of millions of CDCs.

"The primary goal of our study in pulmonary arterial hypertension is to verify safety," Lewis said. "However, we did see significant improvement in laboratory animal tests that we hope will lead us to innovative and effective treatments for a group of patients who currently face an uphill battle."

"This award is a reflection of the continued excellence of our heart institute in leading the field and maintaining Cedars-Sinai as a pioneer in successfully and safely bringing cellular therapies to treat our patients with serious cardiovascular disorders," said Shlomo Melmed, MD, Cedars-Sinai executive vice president for Academic Affairs, dean of the medical faculty and the Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Distinguished Chair in Investigative Medicine.

It is the second time in 2016 that Marbán's research resulted in a major grant to fund a clinical trial for patients with an incurable condition. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense awarded Cedars-Sinai a $10 million grant to fund a cell therapy trial for patients diagnosed with a common but difficult-to-treat form of heart failure called heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

Marbán developed the process to grow CDCs when he was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University; the process was further developed at Cedars-Sinai. Capricor has licensed the process from Johns Hopkins and from Cedars-Sinai for clinical and commercial development. Capricor has licensed additional intellectual property from Cedars-Sinai and the University of Rome. Cedars-Sinai and Marbán have financial interests in Capricor.

Educational Series Focuses on Gender Medicine

Despite a growing body of medical research about gender differences, studies continue to show that most healthcare providers are not being properly trained about discrepancies between the sexes and how those impact the diagnoses and treatments of patients.

To help better inform healthcare providers, the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Institute, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Faculty Development Office at Cedars-Sinai launched a new educational initiative earlier this year called the "Gender Medicine Lunch & Learn TED Talk Series."

The next installment, "Why Medicine Often Has Dangerous Side Effects for Women," is scheduled for Jan. 6 in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, PEC 4-5. The event will begin with a TED talk video by Alyson McGregor of Brown University. The video will be followed by a discussion led by C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, and Sarah Kilpatrick, MD, PhD, chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. A box lunch will be provided.

"There is science that supports the significance of sex and gender differences in everything from the symptoms of heart disease to how we metabolize drugs," Bairey Merz said. "We've got to do a better job of using that knowledge to treat our patients. That is precision medicine and personalized healthcare."

The National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act of 1993 requires that all NIH-funded medical research include women and minorities. The result has been an accumulation of data on sex differences in medical science, but that important information is often overlooked in the care of patients.

Research has shown that women who are nonsmokers are three times more likely to get lung cancer than men who are nonsmokers. Two-thirds of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease are women. And clinical trials have also revealed that while a daily aspirin may significantly reduce the risk of heart attack for men, it does not do so for women — but it lowers women's risk of stroke.

"A major survey of residents and fellows revealed that 70 percent of them were rarely, if ever, taught about gender differences, but a majority felt that kind of training is important and should be given," Kilpatrick said. "This series is an opportunity to begin addressing some of that need for better education and training."

To RSVP for the upcoming discussion, please contact Lorie Younger at lorie.younger@cshs.org or 310-248-6642.

CS-Link Tip: Accessing Record Locator Services

CS-Link™ allows access to Surescripts' National Record Locator Services (NRLS), which provides a list of healthcare facilities a patient has been seen through the Care Everywhere framework.

The NRLS is automatically contacted when the patient has an upcoming appointment, comes through the Emergency Department, or when admitted. You can view a location summary through the documents tab.

Also, Care Everywhere automatically asks for records from organizations within 50 miles of the patient's home and work ZIP code. In addition, records from Veterans Affairs hospitals can also be reached through Care Everywhere.

Grad School Will Offer Master's in Health Delivery

Cedars-Sinai's graduate school will expand next fall with the launch of a master's degree in health delivery science.

The new program will teach students how to measure and deliver valuable healthcare. These are critical skills in managing the pressures of the marketplace, which increasingly rewards medical providers for value of care rather than volume of procedures, said program director Brennan Spiegel, MD.

"Eighteen percent of the gross domestic product goes to healthcare, and there's a science behind how to use those resources in the most effective way," Spiegel said. "It's about improving the quality of care while at the same time reducing the cost."

The program will focus on four core pillars: data analytics, health informatics, healthcare financing, and performance measurement and improvement. For example, students will learn how to use visualization software to make data tell a story and how to program cost-effectiveness software.

The curriculum will explore the latest advances in digital health, including wearable biosensors, social media analytics, smartphone health apps and clinical informatics. Many healthcare employees learn these skill sets on the job but rarely take the time to systematically study them, Spiegel said. Each of these skills is often taught in a separate degree program.

The executive-style program, which is pending accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, will span 20 months and feature evening classes. Target students include clinicians and researchers as well as executives and administrators from industries such as healthcare, insurance, pharmaceuticals and biotech.

The program will feature a capstone project that pairs students with a research or operational team at Cedars-Sinai. Participants will work toward a completed program that aligns with their career goals, which they will present to health system leaders.

Spiegel developed the curriculum with the help of associate program director Teryl Nuckols, MD, and under the supervision of Leon Fine, MD, vice dean of Research and Graduate Research Education. Course organizers are accepting applications for the first class, which starts in September. The plan is to admit about 20 participants.

Though a few other schools have offered health delivery science programs, Spiegel said this one will be unique because it will be taught inside the largest hospital on the West Coast — a massive laboratory for testing and developing novel healthcare delivery models.

"It's the first program to combine aligned biomedical sciences into a single, applied degree that focuses on best practices in value-based healthcare delivery and embeds students directly within a major hospital system," Spiegel said. "Students are not housed in an affiliated school or program, but rather are integrated directly within the front lines of healthcare delivery while working hand in glove with diverse professionals managing decisions in a top-tier healthcare system."

Visit the program's website for more information.

Related story:
Graduate Program in Magnetic Resonance to Begin

Graduate Program in Magnetic Resonance to Begin

Cedars-Sinai's graduate program at the Department of Biomedical Sciences will begin offering a master of science in magnetic resonance in medicine next fall. The program has tripled its master's degree offerings since creating the first one in biomedical science and translational medicine in 2015.

Led by program director Debiao Li, PhD, director of the Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, and associate program director Wafa Tawackoli, PhD, the newly accredited master's program will focus on how magnetic resonance imaging is applied to biomedical research and medicine. While many organizations offer purely technical training or doctoral programs in imaging, a master's program specific to MRI in medicine currently does not exist.

The two-year curriculum features classes, an individualized research project and a hands-on internship led by leading scientists and physicians. Students will master fundamentals of MRI in medicine, such as technical development, research methods and clinical applications.

Graduates will be prepared to serve as supporting scientists in clinical settings, research associates in imaging research centers, or research or applications scientists in industry. The program may also provide continuing education and training for imaging professionals.

The program is now accepting applications for fall 2017, and scholarships are available for select students. For more information, visit the program website or contact the associate program director at wafa.tawackoli@csmc.edu.

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