Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF June 3, 2016 | Archived Issues

Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - June 2016 (PDF)


Milestones

Do you know of a significant event in the life of a medical staff member? Please let us know, and we'll post these milestones in Medical Staff Pulse. Also, feel free to submit comments on milestones, and we'll post the comments in the next issue. Click here to submit your milestones and comments.

Letter from Chief of Staff: Updating Online Profiles

In an effort to enhance efficient communication and ensure that patients are admitted to correct providers, physicians are being asked to update their online profiles with current information and preferences.

» Read more

Deadline for CURES Registration Is Approaching

All California licensed prescribers authorized to prescribe scheduled drugs, and all pharmacists, are required to register with CURES (the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System) by July 1.

» Read more

Congratulations to Leadership Program Graduates

Congratulations to the more than two dozen physicians who graduated in May from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Staff Leadership Development Program. The program is aimed at training and motivating future leaders of the medical staff.

» Read more

Less Obesity Found at Higher Elevations

Woolcott-Orison

Looking to lose fat? Head for the hills. New research led by the Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute adds to growing evidence that people who live at higher altitudes are less likely to be obese than lowlanders. Orison Woolcott, MD, was the first and primary author of the study, published in the journal Obesity, which analyzed data on 31,549 adults in Peru.

» Read more

Immunologist to Keynote June 15 Graduation

Sir Mark Pepys, FRS, MD, PhD

Sir Mark Pepys, FRS, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine and founding director of the Wolfson Drug Discovery Unit at the University College London, will deliver the keynote address at the commencement of the Cedars-Sinai Graduate Program in Biomedical Science and Translational Medicine. The ceremony will take place Wednesday, June 15, at 4 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

New Program Aimed at Helping Smokers Quit

Smokers who want to kick the habit can take advantage of Cedars-Sinai’s smoking cessation program. The program, under the guidance of Sara Ghandehari, MD, medical director of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, provides support and treatment for patients battling tobacco addiction.

» Read more

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Hollywood Bowl

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the legendary band Chicago. The event on Sunday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members.

» Read more

Library Asks Users to Take Online Survey

The Cedars-Sinai Medical Library wants your opinion. The library's annual customer service survey runs through June 10.

» Read more

FDA Issues Warnings Against Prescribing Ketoconazole Oral Tablets and Olanzapine

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising against prescribing ketoconazole oral tables to treat skin and nail fungal infections. Also, the FDA warned about the antipsychotic medicine olanzapine, which can cause a rare but serious skin reaction. And the agency is alerting the public about the potential amputation risks of the diabetes medication canagliflozin.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Widescreen View Worth the Effort

cs-link logo

The new Widescreen view featured in CS-Link may take a little more extra to learn, but it is well worth the effort. The Widescreen view will end up saving time, and will decrease clicks and scrolling.

» Read more

Letter from Chief of Staff: Updating Online Profiles

Dear Colleague:

In an effort to enhance efficient communication and ensure that patients are admitted to correct providers, I request that you please take a moment to update your online profile with your current information and preferences.

Important new fields have been added to help us determine to whom you would like your patients admitted and your preferred after-hours contact information. The availability of this information to the Emergency Department physicians should eliminate the need for unnecessary phone calls and will help to provide patients with efficient and seamless care.

You can access your profile by logging on to CS-Link™  and clicking on web activities (you do not need to be in a patients chart), click on user profile and you will directed to the Provider Privileges Inquiry page. Your logon and password are the same ones you use for CS-Link.

Please review and update both your general and emergency contact information.

Thank you so much,

Peggy Miles, MD
Chief of Staff

Deadline for CURES Registration Is Approaching

Dear Colleagues,

As we get closer to the July 1 deadline, I am sharing CURES 2.0 registration tips. For those who have not registered yet, please complete your registration online.

Tips on registration with the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System are available in the PDF link below.

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact cures@doj.ca.gov or call 916-227-3843.

Thank you,

Peggy B. Miles, MD
Chief of Staff

CURES Registration Tips (PDF)  

Congratulations to Leadership Program Graduates

Congratulations to the more than two dozen physicians who graduated in May from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Staff Leadership Development Program.

The program is aimed at training and motivating future leaders of the medical staff.

In addition to attending a series of lectures, this year’s class also managed a performance improvement project that will impact their patients and practice, allowing hands-on use of the skills and knowledge introduced in the program.

A call for nominations for the 2016-17 academic year from members of the Medical Executive Committee and department chairs has been issued.

MSLD

Medical Staff Leadership Development, Class of 2015-16 graduates

Front row (seated, from left): Carol Lin, MD, Surgery; Christopher Harris, MD, Pediatrics; Azadeh Dashti, MD, Supportive Care Medicine; Michael Broukhim, MD, Medicine/Cardiology; David Kanani, MD, Inpatient Specialty Program; Arthur Wu, MD, Surgery/Otolaryngology; Anna Laury, MD, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Second row (seated, from left): Melissa Wong, MD, program co-chair; Wendy Cheng, MD, Medicine/Nephrology; Tania Basu, MD, Obstetrics and Gynecology; Rodrigo Alban, MD, Surgery; Alison Foster-Goldman, MD, Emergency Medicine; Vanessa Vaz, MD, Emergency Medicine; Ying Zeng, MD, Anesthesiology

Third row (seated, from left): Shaun Miller, MD, program co-chair; Scott Karlan, MD, program co-chair; Steven Hsu, MD, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Shrinath Barathan, MD, Medicine/Nephrology; Jean Lopategui, MD, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Top row (standing, from left): Nicolas Melo, MD, Surgery; Milton Little, MD, Surgery/Orthopedic Trauma; Arthur Cho, MD, Pediatrics; Amir Aljilani, MD, Inpatient Specialty Program; Aaron Chiang, MD, Inpatient Specialty Program

Not pictured: Rebecca Aron, MD, Anesthesiology; Bojana Jankovic, MD, Medical Network/General Internal Medicine; Raj Khandwalla, MD, Medical Network/Internal Medicine/Cardiology; Thomas (Tad) Kremen, MD, Surgery/Orthopedics; Fataneh Majlessipour, MD, Pediatrics; Chris Ng, MD, program co-chair

Less Obesity Found at Higher Elevations

Woolcott-Orison_140px

Orison Woolcott, MD

Looking to lose fat? Head for the hills. New research led by the Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute adds to growing evidence that people who live at higher altitudes are less likely to be obese than lowlanders.

Obesity, which involves excessive accumulation and storage of body fat, is a serious health issue because it increases the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and several types of cancer. In the U.S., more than one-third of adults are considered obese, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Cedars-Sinai study, published in the April issue of the journal Obesity, analyzed data from 31,549 adults in Peru. It found that men there who lived at an elevation of 3,000 meters (9,843 feet) or more had about a 50 percent lower proportion of cases of overall obesity than those living at 500 meters (1,640 feet) or under. At intermediate elevations, the difference was 26 percent. These men also had less abdominal obesity, which is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease.

The relationship between obesity and elevation in the U.S. also has been the subject of research at Cedars-Sinai. For instance, a 2014 Cedars-Sinai study, also published in Obesity, found that U.S. individuals living at high altitude had 25 percent lower odds of being obese than those living at low elevations.

"Our findings suggest that the adjusted inverse association between geographical elevation and obesity extends to different populations around the world," said Orison Woolcott, MD, a project scientist at the Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute. Woolcott was the first and primary author of both studies. About 500 million adults worldwide are believed to be obese, according to the World Health Organization.

Interestingly, the altitude-related difference in obesity prevalence was not observed in women in either study, when adjusted for other factors such as age, self-reported physical activity, education level and income. "The reason for this finding remains unclear and should be further investigated," Woolcott said.

Why altitude and obesity may be related also remains a mystery. Although it's common for lowlanders to eat less when exposed to high altitudes, the effect of prolonged altitude exposure on appetite is not known. The researchers speculated that the colder temperatures found at high elevations may play a role by forcing the body to burn more calories to keep warm. Ambient barometric pressure also may be a factor.

"Future studies are needed to explore the source of the association between geographical elevation and obesity," Woolcott said.

Discussing the significance of the new study, Richard Bergman, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute, said, "Research at our institute is focused on the close relationship between obesity and diabetes. Both have been increasing in tandem. Woolcott's study is important as it may yield insights into which factors at high altitude decrease prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Such insights potentially can be exploited to develop new therapies to reduce these disorders."

Bergman, a professor of Biomedical Sciences and the Alfred Jay Firestein Chair in Diabetes Research, was a co-author of the study.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under award numbers DK29867 and DK2761); the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Bonn-Bad Godesberg, Germany; and the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute grant UL1TR000124.

Immunologist to Keynote June 15 Graduation

Mark Pepys 140px

Sir Mark Pepys, FRS, MD, PhD

Sir Mark Pepys, FRS, MD, PhD, professor of Medicine and founding director of the Wolfson Drug Discovery Unit at the University College London, will deliver the keynote address at the 2016 commencement of the Cedars-Sinai Graduate Program in Biomedical Science and Translational Medicine. The ceremony will take place Wednesday, June 15, at 4 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

Although the deadline for reserved seating has passed, everyone in the Cedars-Sinai community is welcome to attend this festive ceremony.

Seven students will receive their PhDs. The event also will include presentation of the second annual Cedarsā€Sinai Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine (PRISM), awarded to a scientist who has made a remarkable discovery or provided a critical scientific or medical insight within the five preceding years; and the annual David L. Rimoin Teaching Excellence Award.

Pepys is a clinician-scientist who is internationally recognized for his contributions to immunology and to basic and clinical work on amyloidosis and acute phase proteins. Amyloidosis is a disorder in which abnormal proteins, called amyloids, collect in the kidneys, heart or other organs.

Pepys was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, part of the University of Cambridge in England; University College Hospital Medical School; and the Royal Postgraduate Medical School in London. In 1977, as head of the Department of Immunology at the latter school, he established the Immunological Medicine Unit. This unit became one of the world’s leading centers for research and clinical practice.

In 1999, Pepys was invited to become head of medicine at the Royal Free Campus of University College London, where he established the Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins. He also created the National Amyloidosis Centre of the U.K. National Health Service. The recipient of numerous research awards, Pepys has directed the Wolfson Drug Discovery Unit since 2011.

For more information on the June 15 commencement, please call 323-866-7780.

New Program Aimed at Helping Smokers Quit

Smokers who want to kick the habit can take advantage of Cedars-Sinai’s smoking cessation program.

The program, under the guidance of Sara Ghandehari, MD, medical director of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, provides support and treatment for patients battling tobacco addiction.

Customized treatment plans are offered through individual consultation, including medication if deemed necessary. Additionally, patients can participate in group counseling sessions for continued support.

Most insurance providers cover the cost of consultations. Group counseling sessions are offered at no cost to the participant as part of community benefits program.

Refer through CS-Link™ or call the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center at 310-423-9566.

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the legendary band Chicago.

Also performing will be the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra.

The event on Sunday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $135 per adult and $65 per child 3-11 years of age.

Parking passes also are available.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

A photo from the 2015 celebration at the Hollywood Bowl

Library Asks Users to Take Online Survey

The Cedars-Sinai Medical Library wants your opinion. The library's annual customer service survey runs through June 10.

The goals of the online survey are to better understand the information-seeking behavior of the Cedars-Sinai community, and to measure awareness and satisfaction with the library's services.

FDA Issues Warnings Against Prescribing Ketoconazole Oral Tablets and Olanzapine

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning health care professionals against prescribing ketoconazole oral tables to treat skin and nail fungal infections. The use of the medication carries the risk of serious liver damage, adrenal gland problems, and harmful interactions with other medicines, according to the FDA. Despite a 2013 warning about these issues, the antifungal is still being prescribed by some for skin and nail fungus.

The FDA website has more information.

FDA: Antipsychotic Medicine Olanzapine Can Cause Skin Reaction

The FDA has issued a warning about the antipsychotic medicine olanzapine, which can cause a rare but serious skin reaction that can progress to affect other parts of the body. The FDA is adding a new warning to the drug labels for all olanzapine-containing products that describes this severe condition known as drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. The medicine is used to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The FDA website has more information.

FDA: Clinical Trial Shows Increased Amputation Risk With Canagliflozin

The FDA is alerting the public to the results from an ongoing clinical trial that found an increase in leg and foot amputations in patients treated with the diabetes medicine canagliflozin. The FDA is investigating the new safety issue and will update the public when it has more information.

The FDA website has more information.

CS-Link Tip: Widescreen View Worth the Effort

The new Widescreen view featured in CS-Link may take a little more extra to learn, but it is well worth the effort.

The Widescreen view will end up saving time and decrease clicks and scrolling. Also, upcoming improvements to the system will incorporate the Widescreen view.

Learn to be more efficient by attending a Physician Efficiency Training session. The classes are held in Cafeteria Conference Room C. June classes are:

  • Thursday, June 9, noon-1:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, June 14, 7:30 a.m.-9 a.m.
  • Wednesday, June 15, 5 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

If you have questions, email groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.