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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF March 25, 2016 | Archived Issues

FDA Warns About Zydelig

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting healthcare professionals about reports of an increased rate of adverse events, including deaths, in clinical trials with the cancer medicine Zydelig in combination with other cancer medicines.

» Read more


Meetings and Events


Grand Rounds

Click here to view upcoming grand rounds.


Upcoming CME Conferences

Click below to view a complete list of all scheduled Continuing Medical Education conferences.

CME Newsletter - March 2016 (PDF)  


Milestones

Morton W. Klein, MD, has died.

» Read more

Celebrate Doctors' Day With Meet and Greet

Patient care teams will honor Cedars-Sinai physicians on National Doctors' Day with a meet and greet Wednesday, March 30, from 7-9 a.m. on the South Mezzanine. Coffee, pastries and breakfast on the go will be served, and music and pet volunteers will be on hand.

» Read more

Innovation Day To Showcase Ideas for Patient Care

Mark your calendars — on Monday, March 28, from 10 a.m.-noon in Harvey Morse Auditorium, the MD/RN Patient Experience Innovation Challenge will host Innovation Day, the second event of the Innovation Challenge.

» Read more

Transfusion Guidelines Aim for Less PCI Bleeding

Bleeding complications pose significant risks to patient safety and quality of care. Reducing bleeding related to percutaneous coronary intervention from 5.9 percent to 3.8 percent is an institutional priority and a Quality Council goal for this year, and we need your help to achieve it.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Relaxes Ebola-Related Screening

Cedars-Sinai is de-escalating its Ebola-related travel screening efforts. Healthcare workers can discontinue routine screening questions for patients related to recent travel to the formerly affected West African countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Transmission of Ebola virus disease is no longer occurring in any of these countries.

» Read more

Updates Regarding Testing for Zika Virus Infection

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has updated its guidance for testing for Zika virus infection.

» Read more

Stem Cells Could Treat Heart Failure, Study Finds

Eduardo Marbán

Cardiac stem cells could be an effective treatment for a common but difficult-to-treat type of heart failure, a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute shows. The study, published March 2, has led to clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an Investigational New Drug application to test the cells in patients. Heart Institute Director Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, led the research team.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: E-Prescribing Controlled Substances

cs-link logo

New York is abolishing the cryptic prescription scribbled on a piece of paper. The requirement is meant to fight painkiller abuse and reduce errors. Electronic prescribing is a practice convenient for both doctors and patients. You, too, can electronically prescribe controlled substances.

» Read more

Laying the Groundwork for Precision Medicine

Cedars-Sinai is preparing to advance the institution to the forefront of the next healthcare revolution: precision medicine. Using the latest medical discoveries, this revolution seeks to tailor disease treatments and prevention strategies to each unique individual.

» Read more

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Hollywood Bowl

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the legendary band Chicago. The event on Sunday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members.

» Read more

CS-Link Central Has New Design, Easier Navigation

Take a few moments to check out the newly designed CS-Link Central — your source for CS-Link information and resources. The website now offers a fresh look and feel, easier-to-use layout and navigation, better search capabilities and mobile-friendly functionality.

» Read more

Orders for L/S Ratio No Longer Sent Out

As of April 1, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will no longer send out orders for lecithin-sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio to assess fetal lung maturity. In-house service was discontinued in August 2015 and no orders have been sent out in more than six months.

» Read more

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Morgenstern

The 13th annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will convene on Friday, June 3. The debate committee is soliciting topics.



» Read more

Deadline for 2016 PRISM Prize Nominees Is April 1

Nominations are open for the 2016 Cedars-Sinai Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine, which is designed to recognize and encourage a scientific and medical breakthrough in basic or clinical/translational science. The deadline for applications is April 1.

» Read more

Celebrate Doctors' Day With Meet and Greet

Patient care teams will honor Cedars-Sinai physicians on National Doctors' Day with a meet and greet Wednesday, March 30, from 7-9 a.m. on the South Mezzanine.

Coffee, pastries and breakfast on the go will be served, and music and pet volunteers will be on hand.

Staff in each unit will have a social gathering in their conference rooms: coffee and pastries for physicians who come to the units, including the Emergency Department, O.R., outpatient areas and clinics.

For more information, call Peachy Hain, MSN, RN, at 310-423-6747.

Doctors' Day - March 30, 2016 (PDF)  

Innovation Day To Showcase Ideas for Patient Care

Mark your calendars — on Monday, March 28, from 10 a.m.-noon in Harvey Morse Auditorium, the MD/RN Patient Experience Innovation Challenge will host Innovation Day, the second event of the Innovation Challenge.

Since Pitch Day in November, 10 semifinalist teams have been testing, developing and refining their innovative ideas to improve patient care through a Grand Slam Workshop Series. External industry and internal Cedars-Sinai mentors coached the teams on prototyping, user experience and crafting a successful pitch.

The 10 teams will pitch their detailed prototypes and user feedback to the panel of executive judges for the chance to advance to the final round.

On Innovation Day, the panel will select six teams to move onto the finals. Each panelist will also select a team to sponsor during this final phase.

MDRN

The teams in the innovation challenge recently went through a workshop series, during which mentors from Cedars-Sinai and industry coached them on prototyping, user experience and crafting a successful pitch.

Transfusion Guidelines Aim for Less PCI Bleeding

Bleeding complications pose significant risks to patient safety and quality of care. Reducing bleeding related to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from 5.9 percent to 3.8 percent is an institutional priority and a Quality Council goal for this year, and we need your help to achieve it.

There are five categories of post-PCI bleeding events, one of which is "Post-PCI transfusion for patients with a pre-procedure HgB > 8 g/dL within 30 days post-procedure." To reduce the number of inappropriate post-PCI blood transfusions, the Cedars-Sinai red blood cell transfusion guidelines from 2012 have been amended as follows.

Consider post-PCI blood transfusion only if:

  • Hematocrit ≤ 21 percent or hemoglobin ≤ 7g/dL in
  • Patients with stable, nonactive coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Patients with revascularized nonactive CAD (including post-PCI patients if revascularization has occurred)
  • Hematocrit < 24 percent or hemoglobin < 8g/dL in
  • Patients with unrevascularized symptomatic CAD, with evidence of ischemia
  • Please note that patients with symptomatic CAD should receive blood prior to PCI, rather than after intervention, with a goal of hemoglobin > 8g/dL
  • These guidelines do not apply in areas where there is active bleeding or the anticipation of significant blood loss, such as operating rooms, procedure rooms, labor and delivery, and chemotherapy.
  • Threshold numbers do not mandate transfusion, and clinical judgment should guide the use of products in otherwise stable patients.

These guidelines are posted on the Intranet under Clinical Resources.

A Best Practices Alert will pop up in CS-Link when a blood transfusion is ordered for a PCI patient who falls outside the guidelines. This is an attempt to make physicians consider whether the blood transfusion is indicated. Please don't simply click on active blood loss just to bypass the order, but take the time to think about the indications.

Post-PCI blood transfusions are monitored daily by the Blood Bank, and any transfusion that falls outside of guidelines will be subject to clinical chart review by cardiologists to determine its appropriateness. Transfusion orders deemed inappropriate will be followed up with a conversation between the ordering physician and reviewers from Cardiology.

On behalf of the Department of Medicine and Division of Cardiology, thank you in advance for your collaboration in this important hospitalwide effort to assure the best standard of care for our patients. If you have questions, please contact Steven Tabak, MD, medical director for Quality and Physician Outreach at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

Cedars-Sinai Relaxes Ebola-Related Screening

Cedars-Sinai is de-escalating its Ebola-related travel screening efforts.

Healthcare workers can discontinue routine screening questions for patients related to recent travel to the formerly affected West African countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. Transmission of Ebola virus disease is no longer occurring in any of these countries.

Travelers from Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia are no longer being monitored by the California Department of Public Health or the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. If travelers become ill, they do not need to be managed as having suspected Ebola infection.

As infectious diseases continue to emerge globally, it remains important to routinely obtain a recent travel history for any patient presenting with symptoms of an infectious disease. Patient care personnel should routinely ask questions about recent travel (within the month prior to symptoms) for patients with symptoms of infection. To this end, Cedars-Sinai is working to develop and incorporate more generalized travel screening information and guidance into CS Link.

Cedars-Sinai is making the changes in response to recent updates and guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For more information, contact the Department of Hospital Epidemiology at 310-423-5574.

Information about current global outbreaks may be found at the CDC's website.

Updates Regarding Testing for Zika Virus Infection

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has updated its guidance for testing for Zika virus infection as indicated below:

  • Preapproval is no longer needed from the Public Health Department to submit serum specimens for Zika virus testing (there has been no change in indications for testing from prior communication).
  • Providers may submit specimens along with a completed Zika virus testing and report form (PDF). Specimens and completed forms will be shipped to the Public Health lab as per existing procedures for send-out tests.
  • Please note that certain situations still require phone call notification to the Los Angeles Acute Communicable Disease Control Program (ACDC) at 213-240-7941. These situations include:
  • Pregnant travelers with evidence of fetal microcephaly or calcifications
  • Infants with evidence of maternal Zika virus infection
  • Travelers with a Guillain-Barré diagnosis
  • A complete list of indications for phone call notification is found on the attached reporting form
  • Requests for testing specimens of amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood or tissue from a fetus or newborn with microcephaly or intracranial calcifications should be made by phone to ACDC.

Additional information regarding Zika virus and testing can be found at:

Stem Cells Could Treat Heart Failure, Study Finds

Eduardo Marban

Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD

Cardiac stem cells could be an effective treatment for a common but difficult-to-treat type of heart failure, a new study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute shows.

The study, published March 2, has led to clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for an investigational new drug application to test the cells in patients.

Appearing in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology Basic and Translational Science, the study shows that weeks after infusions of cardiosphere-derived cells, the heart-pumping function returned to normal in laboratory rats with hypertension and diastolic heart failure.

Formerly known as diastolic heart failure, the diagnosis now called heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes so stiff that its pumping chambers cannot properly fill with blood. Even though the heart's ability to pump blood to the body remains normal, its inability to fill with blood over time can lead to fluid buildup. This affects other body organs and causes fluid congestion, especially in the lungs. The hard-to-treat condition leads to extreme fatigue and difficulty breathing.

Today, more than half of patients with heart failure have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, which is particularly common in women and in patients who also have diabetes, obesity and hypertension.

"There is an enormous unmet clinical need, but nobody has a clue as to how to treat it," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, noting that approximately 3 million people in the U.S. have this form of heart failure. "None of the drugs that work in regular heart failure work for these patients."

Marbán, an international leader in cardiac stem cell research, led the Cedars-Sinai team that completed the world's first cardiac stem cell infusion in 2009. Results from that clinical trial, published in The Lancet, showed that stem cells could regenerate new, healthy heart muscle after a heart attack. Marbán's work now also examines whether stem cells can be used to heal other heart ailments.

In the new research study, 34 laboratory rats with hypertension and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction were given infusions of cardiac stem cells. A second group of 34 laboratory rats were given a placebo. Four weeks later, the rats in the stem cells group had normalized heart function and their hearts were able to fill normally. Those in the placebo group became progressively sicker and died prematurely.

"When patients with preserved ejection fraction get sick, they might be hospitalized and they might be prescribed medications like diuretics, which reduce the buildup of fluid in the lungs. The patients might get better symptomatically, but we haven't really treated the underlying condition," said Marbán, the lead author of the study. "This research suggests that cardiac stem cells could be effective as a therapeutic agent, and there is a specific treatment we can try when everything else has failed."

The study was funded by the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Heart Stem Cell Center. General support for Marbán's laboratory is provided by the National Institutes of Health.

Meanwhile, on the basis of these findings, Marbán has recently obtained clearance from the FDA for an investigational new drug application to use cardiospheres to treat humans with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The stem cells, manufactured by Capricor Inc. as product CAP-1002, have been used in other human clinical trials.

The process to grow cardiac-derived stem cells was developed by Marbán when he was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University. Capricor has licensed the process from Johns Hopkins for clinical and commercial development. Capricor has licensed additional intellectual property from Cedars-Sinai and the University of Rome. Cedars-Sinai and Marbán have financial interest in Capricor.

CS-Link Tip: E-Prescribing Controlled Substances

New York is abolishing the cryptic prescription scribbled on a piece of paper. The requirement is meant to fight painkiller abuse and reduce errors. Electronic prescribing is a practice convenient for both doctors and patients.

You, too, can electronically prescribe controlled substances. The acronym is EPCS (Electronic Prescriptions for Controlled Substances). EPCS allows you to send, via e-prescription, your controlled medication orders (hydrocodone, oxycodone, etc). In CS-Link, order the medication as you usually would. Set the status to Normal, so that it will go to the pharmacy.

You sign the order — a window displays to review the order before signing. You select the Drug Enforcement Administration number to use from a dropdown, should you have more than one. If you only have one DEA number, it's automatically selected. Check the Reviewed check box next to each controlled med.

You click Sign, and you will be asked to provide two forms of authentication:

  • Your login password.
  • The ID generated from your RSA soft/hard token. If you don't have a RSA soft/hard token, get one by filling out a CARS form.

There are four medications for which this does not work: Xyrem, methadone, buprenorphine and buprenorphine+Naloxone.

As always, please reach out to learn more about CS-Link by emailing groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.

Please consider attending a Physician Efficiency Training class in Cafeteria Conference Room C. For a list of training sessions, see CS-Link Central.

Laying the Groundwork for Precision Medicine

Cedars-Sinai is preparing to advance the institution to the forefront of the next healthcare revolution: precision medicine. Using the latest medical discoveries, this revolution seeks to tailor disease treatments and prevention strategies to each unique individual.

"Precision medicine at Cedars-Sinai is a partnership between scientists, clinicians and industry," Dermot McGovern, MD, PhD, quoting from the initiative's mission statement, told 30 department leaders March 17 at a meeting at the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion. "We will drive the development of the newest technology and best research, coupled to the finest clinical practice, to rapidly deliver precise and personalized healthcare solutions."

McGovern directs a six-member core group that is laying the groundwork for the official launch of the Precision Medicine Initiative on Sept. 16. For profiles of the members, please see "Meet the Precision Medicine Leaders" below.

The concept of precision medicine, sometimes called personalized medicine, has been around for a long time, McGovern explained. To prove his point, he quoted from Leo Tolstoy's 19th century novel War and Peace: "No disease suffered by a live man [or woman] can be known, for every living person has his own peculiarities and always has his own peculiar, personal, novel, complicated disease, unknown to medicine." (McGovern added the bracketed phrase.)

But scientific advances in the past quarter-century have propelled precision medicine to a higher plane. These advances include the sequencing of the human genome, plus new insights into our bodies' complex chemical activity (metabolomics), protein function and structure (proteomics) and billions of microorganisms (the microbiome).

With the help of ever-faster computing, all the so-called big data generated by these discoveries can be combined into a comprehensive profile of an individual's biology. Using mobile applications and sensors, patients can even generate their own data, such as heart rates and blood-glucose levels, at home — an advance called "near-patient technologies."

"We strongly believe that we are developing an innovative and very significant initiative at Cedars-Sinai," McGovern said. The initiative's mission statement predicts that "scientific advances derived from 'big data' will provide the therapeutic and diagnostic tools that our clinicians need to significantly impact patient care." Besides improving health, these advances can ultimately provide more cost-effective healthcare to the community, McGovern noted.

In one example, Sumeet S. Chugh, MD, medical director of the Heart Rhythm Center at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, said that potentially, a heart patient could monitor his or her own vital signs, such as administering an electrocardiogram. That data, combined with personal health information on file, could enable the patient to avoid making an unnecessary 911 call for symptoms that might not require emergency care.

In remarks at the March 17 meeting, Shlomo Melmed, executive vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the medical faculty, said Cedars-Sinai's flexible organizational structure, combined with its research talent and large-scale healthcare delivery operation, make it well-qualified to achieve national prominence in precision medicine. "Now is the time to grab this opportunity," he said.

Cedars-Sinai already is having an impact in the field. It was selected by the White House to participate in a Feb. 25 summit in Washington marking the one-year anniversary of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative. It is one of three California institutions invited by the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine to participate in a seminar on the topic this week at the American Medical Informatics Association meeting in San Francisco.

The next steps for Cedars-Sinai's leaders include assessing the skills and resources needed to support precision medicine, deciding which problems to tackle first, maximizing collaborations between internal scientific groups and industry partners, and selecting criteria for initial projects. Breakout sessions at the March 17 meeting were devoted to each of these topics.

Despite the challenges ahead, leaders of the Precision Medicine Initiative at Cedars-Sinai voiced optimism at the meeting. "Today is a very special day. Today is the day we are going to break some barriers and drive the next generation of therapies and diagnoses," said Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD, director of the Advanced Clinical Biosystems Institute and of Basic Science Research in the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center. She is co-director of the Precision Medicine Initiative.

PMIchart_480px

Precision medicine relies on input from multiple scientific disciplines, technologies and departments at Cedars-Sinai.


Meet the Precision Medicine Leaders

The new Precision Medicine Initiative at Cedars-Sinai, which seeks to tailor disease treatments and prevention strategies to each unique individual, is coordinated by a six-member core group. Here are brief profiles of the members:

Dermot_McGovern_100pxDermot McGovern, MD, PhD

Director of Translational Medicine, F. Widjaja Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute
Director, Precision Medicine Initiative at Cedars-Sinai

McGovern's laboratory studies the role of genetic variation in susceptibility to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in diverse populations. It utilizes big-data approaches to identify biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for IBD that feed the Drug Discovery and Development Group, which McGovern co-directs.

JenniferVanEyk_100pxJennifer Van Eyk, PhD

Director, Basic Science Research in the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center
Director, Advanced Clinical Biosystems Institute
Co-director, Precision Medicine Initiative at Cedars-Sinai

Van Eyk launched the Advanced Clinical Biosystems Research Institute, where the motto is "from discovery to patient care." Her laboratory is known for its proteomic technical pipeline. She works extensively with academic, industry and pharmaceutical partners to pursue key clinical areas in a number of diseases.

BeatriceKnudsen_100pxBeatrice Knudsen, MD, PhD

Director, Biobank and Translational Research Core
Director, Translational Research, Department of Pathology

Knudsen is a pathologist-scientist who is passionate about converting microscopic images into numbers that can be quantitatively analyzed to facilitate discovery of new molecular biomarkers. The multiplex tissue staining technology and digital image analysis methods that she has developed are designed to advance the diagnosis and treatment of many human diseases.

BenjaminBerman_100pxBenjamin Berman, PhD

Director, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Research Center

Berman's laboratory focuses on developing new methods for cancer genome analysis. Berman also is a principal investigator in the National Cancer Institute's Informatics Technology for Cancer Research program, which aims to develop open software and data standards for the cancer research community.

SpencerSoohoo_100pxSpencer SooHoo, PhD

Director of Scientific Computing
Chief Security Officer, Enterprise Information Services (EIS)

SooHoo directs the EIS-based Research Informatics and Scientific Computing Core, which supports researchers with High Performance Computing clusters, storage and databases. He plays key roles in the UCLA CTSI Bioinformatics Program and the pSCANNER network, which both involve building networks to identify potential cohorts of research subjects across multiple institutions.

IanWright_100pxIan Wright (Consultant), CBiol

President and Founder, Strategic Innovations LLC
Chief Strategic Adviser, Applied Clinical Biosystems Research Institute and Precision Medicine Initiative

Wright's company makes connections among scientists, clinicians, industry and investors. The goal is to direct a strategy that develops great ideas to benefit patients as quickly and safely as possible. Wright sits on the boards of, or is an adviser to, a number of early-stage and large bioscience companies.

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the legendary band Chicago.

Also performing will be the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra.

The event on Sunday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $135 per adult and $65 per child 3-11 years of age.

Parking passes also are available.

To reserve a place for either event, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

Hollywood Bowl 2015 0208 480px

A photo from the 2015 celebration at the Hollywood Bowl

CS-Link Central Has New Design, Easier Navigation

Take a few moments to check out the newly designed CS-Link Central — your source for CS-Link information and resources. The website now offers:

  • A fresh look and feel
  • Easier-to-use layout and navigation
  • Better search capabilities
  • Mobile-friendly functionality

Now you can more easily find what you're looking for, whether that's a job aid, training information (e.g., e-learning modules, course catalog) or the latest information about ongoing initiatives and upcoming enhancements.

Orders for L/S Ratio No Longer Sent Out

As of April 1, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will no longer send out orders for lecithin-sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio to assess fetal lung maturity. In-house service was discontinued in August 2015 and no orders have been sent out in more than six months.

Several published reports have demonstrated that a lamellar body count of 40,000-50,000 is strongly correlated to fetal lung maturity (e.g., sensitivity greater than 90 percent). Lamellar body counts can be obtained on a 24/7 basis in-house via the Core Laboratory. Pathology and Laboratory Medicine encourages use of lamellar body counts for fetal lung maturity in lieu of L/S ratio, which is a technically difficult, laborious and dated assay that has fallen out of favor.

If you have questions, contact Kimia Sobhani, PhD, at kimia.sobhani@cshs.org or Holli Mason, MD, at holli.mason@cshs.org.

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Morgenstern Leon 140px

Leon Morgenstern, MD, was the founding director of Surgery at Cedars-Sinai. He died in 2012.

The 13th annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will convene on Friday, June 3. The debate committee is soliciting topics.

The chosen topic must cut across all specialties and must be of timely import to the Cedars community.

Please send your suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, Morgenstern Debate coordinator, at leo.gordon@cshs.org.

Last year's debate is available for viewing. Contact Gordon for access.

Deadline for 2016 PRISM Prize Nominees Is April 1

PRISM

Nominations are open for the 2016 Cedars-Sinai Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine (PRISM), which is designed to recognize and encourage a scientific and medical breakthrough in basic or clinical/translational science. The deadline for applications is April 1.

The PRISM prize is awarded annually to a Cedars-Sinai investigator who has made a remarkable discovery or provided a critical scientific or medical insight within the five preceding years.

The prize is awarded at the commencement ceremony of the Graduate Programs in Biomedical Science and Translational Medicine and consists of a medal and an award of $10,000 to the winner.

All Cedars-Sinai faculty members are eligible for the award. Prior nominees can be renominated, provided that the discovery falls within the preceding five-year period.

Nomination Process

Nominations should be made by a single member of the Cedars-Sinai faculty. Self-nomination is not allowed. Supporting letters from up to two seconders are permissible, but not required.

The nominator must submit a three-page maximum summary of the single discovery being cited as being worthy of the prize which:

  • Explains the state of the art prior to the discovery
  • Describes the discovery
  • Provides additional information that illustrates how the discovery was first made known to, and was received by, the scientific and medical community

Final decisions will be made by an impartial external panel of three expert judges, none of whom is an active member of the Cedars-Sinai faculty.

Applications must be received by the vice dean for Research no later than April 1 and should be sent to leon.fine@cshs.org.

The complete package should be submitted only by the nominator and should include:

  • Nomination letter
  • Up-to-date curriculum vitae of nominee
  • Copies of relevant publications outlining the discovery and published within the preceding 5-year period
  • Up to two letters from seconders of the nomination (permitted but not required)

Incomplete applications will not be forwarded to the review panel.