Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF Aug. 11, 2017 | Archived Issues

Deadly Bacteria Could Reduce Organ Rejection

An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found treating patients with the drug IdeS® before transplantation significantly reduced, and in most cases eliminated, donor-specific antibodies that can cause rejection or failure of new organs.

» Read more

U.S. News Best Hospitals 2017-18

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is ranked nationally in 12 specialties and has been named to the "Honor Roll" in the just-released U.S. News & World Report's "Best Hospitals 2017-18." The medical center was ranked #11 of more than 4,500 hospitals in the nation, placing it among a select group of Honor Roll hospitals.

» Read more

Learn About Mission to Guatemala on Aug. 20

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Employees interested in participating in Cedars-Sinai's annual medical mission to Guatemala next February are invited to attend a recruitment meeting on Sunday, Aug. 20, from 10-11:30 a.m. in ECC-A. The 2018 mission will take place in February.

» Read more

Librarian Brings Wit and Intellect to Her Work

Librarian Janet Wulf co

For decades, Janet Wulf's inquisitive energy, intellectual curiosity and wry sense of humor have made her an indispensable fixture in the Medical Library. The recent winner of a Cedars-Sinai President's Award is best known for her exhibits that include ones on Civil War medicine, patent medicine bottles and objects removed from human airways.

» Read more

Wrestler, Cedars-Sinai Help Save Injured Woman

Barbara and Keta co

One in an occasional series of stories highlighting the #CedarsGratitude effort. Share why you are grateful for Cedars-Sinai here.

Barb Sachs was walking to the grocery store when she was struck by a car. A quick-thinking witness sprang into action, applying ice packs, calling 911 and picking glass out of Sach's hair. The Level 1 trauma team at Cedars-Sinai soon took over and helped save Sach's life.

» Read more

CS Joins Effort to Promote Physician Wellbeing

Cedars-Sinai is participating in a national effort to encourage a culture of wellbeing in the clinical learning environment. The wellness subcommittee of the Graduate Medical Education Committee held its first monthly meeting about the national campaign in June to develop plans for resident wellbeing. The Cedars-Sinai group will collaborate with other hospitals from across the country to create and implement programs to help fight the growing nationwide problem of physician burnout and depression.

» Read more

Epidemiologist Haile Joins Cancer Institute

Epidemiologist Robert Haile, DrPH, has joined the faculty of the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. The research scientist also will serve as associate director for Translational Population Science.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for July

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 85 people in July. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Sand 'N' Snore Set for Sept. 8

Sand 'N' Snore

Sand 'N' Snore is just around the corner. The dinner, sleepover and breakfast starts Friday, Sept. 8, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. Those who don't want to sleep on the sand are welcome to enjoy dinner and the evening with colleagues and their families.

» Read more

Walter E. Berman, MD: 1923-2017

Walter E. Berman, MD, one of the founding members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, died on July 24. He was 94. Berman, an otolaryngologist, began his career in 1954 at Cedars of Lebanon and Mount Sinai hospitals before their merger, and later continued to practice at Cedars-Sinai for decades.

» Read more

New Online CME Course on Treating IBD Patients

The Cedars-Sinai Center for Outcomes Research and Education and the Office of Continuing Medical Education have developed a new online course for clinicians treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The care of patients with IBD is complex, with treatment options allowing for differing treatment strategies.

» Read more

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Laboratory Culture Reports

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Many physicians have asked for a clearer view of laboratory culture reports and they are available in CS-Link™. First-time users will need to add the report to their summary toolbar using the wrench. Once done, the report will be a click away.

» Read more

Deadly Bacteria Could Reduce Organ Rejection

An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found treating patients with the drug IdeS® before transplantation significantly reduced, and in most cases eliminated, donor-specific antibodies that can cause rejection or failure of new organs. These antibodies represent an often impenetrable immunologic barrier to transplantation.

IdeS® is derived from an enzyme in the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes, which causes disorders ranging from sore throats to life-threatening infections.

Stanley C. Jordan, MD, medical director of the Kidney Transplant Program at Cedars-Sinai, said the enzyme is the only one that can completely remove organ-rejecting antibodies and allow kidney transplantation to take place. He noted that one hour after infusion of the enzyme, antibodies declined drastically.

"We found that IdeS® could immediately cut patient antibodies in half, making them powerless to attack and injure a newly transplanted kidney," said Jordan, the study’s lead author. "We can put a new kidney in a patient without it being rejected."

All people have human leukocyte antigens (HLA), proteins that are key to the immune system’s defense against bacteria, viruses and other potentially harmful invaders. Patients develop antibodies to foreign HLA due to failed organ transplants, transfusions or pregnancy.

These antibodies persist over a patient’s lifetime, causing the body to perceive a newly donated organ as a threat and then attack it. This response prevents patients from having a successful kidney transplant, and they often remain on dialysis for years with diminished quality and length of life.

The study of IdeS® involved two coordinated investigations, with a total of 25 patients treated in the U.S. and Sweden. Twenty-four of the patients were transplanted successfully after receiving the investigational therapy.

The special enzyme is produced by Hansa Medical of Sweden.

"IdeS® could change the way we treat antibody rejections overall," said Jordan, who also directs the Human Leukocyte Antigen and Transplant Immunology Laboratory at Cedars-Sinai. "We think this approach to preventing organ rejection has the potential to offer significant benefits to those in need of heart, lung, liver and bone marrow transplants."

Nearly 128,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for organ transplants, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, with more than 105,000 needing new kidneys. Many of them wait years for an organ to become available, only to have their bodies' immune systems attack it.

"We need larger studies to confirm the promising results of this unique approach to removing patient antibodies that threaten newly transplanted organs," Jordan said. "And we want to investigate any long-term impact IdeS® therapy may have on overall antibody production in patients."

Research reported in this study was supported by Hansa Medical of Sweden.

Disclosure: Jordan reports receiving fees from Hansa for medical and scientific consultation.

DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1612567

U.S. News Best Hospitals 2017-18

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is ranked nationally in 12 specialties and has been named to the "Honor Roll" in the just-released U.S. News & World Report's "Best Hospitals 2017-18."

The medical center was ranked #11 of more than 4,500 hospitals in the nation, placing it among a select group of Honor Roll hospitals.

The rankings are based on a variety of measures, including patient outcomes, patient safety, technology and reputation (based on surveying physicians). Each year, U.S. News makes changes in its rankings methodology; among the changes this year is a risk adjustment based on socioeconomic status.

As with all of the accolades and honors Cedars-Sinai receives, we can be very proud of our performance. It is important, however, to keep "hospital scorecards" like this and others in perspective. Currently, there are limits and methodological flaws in such rankings, and we should not let them distract any of us from our most important work — providing the highest-quality, efficient, affordable, patient-centered care possible.

At Cedars-Sinai, we have rigorous metrics in place to continually assess our quality, efficiency and effectiveness in patient care, research, education and community benefit. We will continue to use these metrics both to assess our performance and to help identify opportunities for continual improvement.

With that balanced perspective in mind, the U.S. News rankings are one of many ways of recognizing the outstanding work that goes on daily at Cedars-Sinai. Below are the 12 specialties for which Cedars-Sinai was ranked nationally:

  • Cancer (#47)
  • Cardiology and Heart Surgery (#4)
  • Diabetes and Endocrinology (#18)
  • Ear, Nose and Throat (#26)
  • Gastroenterology and GI surgery (#4)
  • Geriatrics (#21)
  • Gynecology (#28)
  • Nephrology (#15)
  • Neurology & Neurosurgery (#14)
  • Orthopedics (#10)
  • Pulmonology (#20)
  • Urology (#12)

The quality of care and compassion that all of our patients receive are the result of the commitment every one of you brings to work each day. On behalf of our patients and community, thank you for being at Cedars-Sinai.

Learn About Mission to Guatemala on Aug. 20

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For many residents, a visit from Cedars-Sinai medical professionals marks their only access to healthcare all year.

Employees interested in participating in Cedars-Sinai's annual medical mission to Guatemala next February are invited to attend a recruitment meeting on Sunday, Aug. 20, from 10-11:30 a.m. in ECC-A. The 2018 mission will take place Feb. 10-19.

Information on how to volunteer as well as what the mission entails will be available. People from all positions are encouraged to attend.

"We are looking for volunteers from a variety of work experiences and backgrounds to attend," said Jim Laur, vice president of Legal and Technology Affairs. "We need doctors and nurses, but just as important are people who can speak Spanish, can cook, are willing to clean or provide a variety of other support to the team's activities."

The mission is in partnership with HELPS International, a nonprofit group that organizes a wide range of volunteer activities in Guatemala. Volunteers have to use vacation time for the 10-day trip, and they pay for their own transportation.

"It is a meaningful and impactful trip for everyone who volunteers," Laur said. "You witness the direct impact you have on these people's lives."

The Cedars-Sinai team, which consists of roughly 80 people, travels to a rural village with equipment and supplies where they setup a clinic and an operating room. The team sees hundreds of patients, most of whom have no access to healthcare.

For more information, contact Olivia Marroquin at oliviamr531@gmail.com.

Librarian Brings Wit and Intellect to Her Work

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Janet Wulf, a recent President's Award winner, has worked at Cedars-Sinai for more than four decades, most of those in the Medical Library.

"Objects Removed From Human Airways" was the title of one of Janet Wulf's previous exhibits in the Medical Library. The objects included:

  • Meat impacted in esophagus
  • Fishbone in larynx
  • Pin in trachea
  • Chicken bone in esophagus
  • Safety pin in esophagus
  • Bone in right bronchus
  • Peanut in bronchus
  • Sandbur in right bronchus
  • Bone; forceps tip in esophagus
  • Rabbit thigh in esophagus
  • Penny in esophagus
  • Nickel in esophagus
  • Potato in trachea
  • Jigsaw puzzle piece in esophagus
  • Corn kernel in right bronchus
  • Dog tag in esophagus
  • Open safety pin in esophagus
  • Glass bead in right main esophagus
  • Eggshell in larynx
  • Nickel in esophagus
  • Quarter in esophagus
  • Screw in right main bronchus
  • Sewing machine bobbin in esophagus
  • Whistle in esophagus
  • Upholstery tack in left bronchus
  • Nutshell in larynx

(This list was compiled in commemoration of Barney M. Kully, MD, 1896-1975.)

Even for a medical center, Janet Wulf's desk is a bit unusual.

Between a Hewlett-Packard printer and bottle of green aloe Purell is a glass replica of a life-size human head. On top of the transparent cranium sits a spongy gray brain, the size of a child's fist. Within arm's reach of the desk is a small model of a human body and its acupuncture points.

"I bought the head at Ross [Dress for Less]," said Wulf, an administrative services associate in the Medical Library who has worked at Cedars-Sinai for 42 years. "I got the brain from a vendor."

The scavenged items, like so many strange and exotic earlier ones, will only temporarily reside on her desk, which functions more as a runway to the library's main display case near the front entrance. The collection, which also will feature vintage pill boxes and a 1972 research paper entitled "The Headache in History, Literature, and Legend," are all earmarked for an upcoming exhibit on the headache.

Her desk and its multivaried contents merely reflect the bright and curious mind that has curated it for decades. With an inquisitive energy and a wry sense of humor, Wulf has established herself as an indispensable fixture in the Medical Library. Staging the library's popular exhibits are just the start of her duties, which also include purchashing, cataloguing, circulation, event planning and organizing an ongoing lecture series featuring authors affiliated with Cedars-Sinai.

"She's a driving force for the library," said Janet Hobbs, the library's manager. "She's just super creative and very interested in politcs, history and music. She's been an invaluable way for us to engage with our users in different and meaningful ways."

On any given day, this Cedars-Sinai President's Award winner engages in a host of traditional library duties. They include everything from answering questions at the reference desk, registering new library patrons and cataloging the facility's 25,000 bound books to helping a medical student hunt down obscure references in one of the library's 22,000 electronic medical journals.

When Wulf arrived in 1975, just one year before the first patient was admitted to the newly formed medical center created by the merging of Cedars of Lebanon and Mount Sinai Hospital, she didn't start out in the library.

At that time, jobs for new college graduates were hard to come by and the hospital needed phone operators as it transitioned from the switchboard phones to a modern-day telecommunications system. So Wulf — armed with an English degree from California State University, Northridge — applied for the job and was hired.

"People were asking for stuff like, ‘Can I speak to the epidemiologist?' And I'd go, ‘What?'" she laughed. "So I had to learn — while running on my feet — all the medical terminology."

She later worked in admissions before landing in the Medical Library in the late 1980s. Back then, card catalogues were still used and copies were made with a mimeograph machine.

vintage headache curatives 300px

Wulf found these vintage containers for headache remedies to use in an upcoming exhibit.

"The correction fluid smell would make you dizzy," she said. "It was awful and messy. I had gloves and a lab coat and ink flying. It was terrible."

But for a sense of what makes Wulf tick, library patrons need look no further than the display case just inside the library entrance. About six times a year, she and her colleagues set up a new exhibit to showcase the library's archives. And it's Wulf's quirky sensibilities that typically flavor what patrons see, read and learn from them.

She fondly recalled a display on western frontier medicine, which included her own cowboy and horse models, a Stetson hat, an advertisement for snake oil remedies and a wanted poster. To invoke a bit more wild west realism, she drizzled fake blood left over from Halloween on some rags she slung over the side of an old tin bowl.

"I sort of have an interesting sense of humor," she said with a smile.

Few library visitors who observed her "Foreign Objects Removed from Human Airways" exhibit would disagree. Other topics she's helped bring to life include Civil War medicine, healthcare ethics, patent medicine bottles and a history of Cedars-Sinai.

That historical look at the medical center showcased commemorative keys to the hospital next to prehistoric bones excavated during hospital construction and a collection of maps of the facility dating back to 1938.

To give it a splash of color and fun, Wulf threw in a bright Mount Sinai Hospital brochure featuring a yellow convertible, circa 1954. Nearby, she displayed a hospital café menu from 1962 that advertised a 10-cent cup of coffee and a 75-cent hamburger.

"The prices were just so ridiculous," said Wulf whose interests outside of work includes horses and classic Hollywood cinema. "But I hope when people come away from that exhibit or any others, they leave with a sense of enlightened interest."

While many of the items on display come from the library's collection that's stored in boxes on its shelves, some of it comes from Wulf's own stash of vintage books and assorted knickknacks she enjoys collecting.

While recently antiquing with her sister, Wulf found some vintage tins and bottles that held analgesia medications for headaches. That served as the inspiration for the upcoming exhibit on the history of the headache.

"The history of medicine … is just fascinating," she said. "It's is one of my favorite topics here in the library."

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Wulf sits before a table of material earmarked for an upcoming library display.

Wrestler, Cedars-Sinai Help Save Injured Woman

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Barb Sachs (left) and Keta Meggett

One in an occasional series of stories highlighting the #CedarsGratitude effort. Share why you are grateful for Cedars-Sinai here.

On July 15, 2016, Barb Sachs decided to pick up lunch by walking nine blocks from her apartment to a grocery store in the San Fernando Valley.

The day was extremely hot, but she doesn't remember what occurred next.

"It's a brilliant thing what trauma does, because I have no memory of what happened," said Sachs, 56. "I don't even remember what I wore."

From information she's gathered from police reports, eyewitnesses and her doctor, Sachs now knows the details: On that day, at about 11:15 a.m., as she crossed the street at Laurel Canyon Boulevard and Riverside Drive in Valley Village, a car turned left and hit her, flipping her onto the car's hood. Her head smashed against the windshield, and she then fell to the ground, covered in shards of glass.

While bystanders panicked, a quick-thinking witness to the incident sprang into action, applying ice packs, calling 911 and picking glass out of Sachs' hair. Paramedics arrived and recognized that Sachs needed a Level 1 trauma center, so they took her to Cedars-Sinai.

Sachs had a traumatic brain injury. She would end up having two emergency brain surgeries and spending 20 days in the hospital, including two weeks in a coma. Her rescue, she now says, was a story of real-life heroes: her surgeon, her care team and one person in particular — Keta Meggett.

A Hero on the Scene

Meggett isn't just a real-life hero — she also plays one on TV: She's Keta Rush, Women of Wrestling's Bully Buster, billed as using brains and brawn to battle bullies in and out of the ring.

Meggett's story isn't entirely fiction. After being beaten up by a group of girls when she was a high school freshman, she spent a week in the hospital, then months in physical therapy. She would later start a nonprofit to teach children confidence, leadership and self-defense.

At the moment when Sachs was struck, Meggett, 38, was sitting behind the wheel of her white SUV. She happened to have six ice packs strapped to her body, because she was in physical therapy after having been in a car crash herself months earlier.

Immediately after Sachs was struck, Meggett recalled, everyone at the scene seemed to be still for a few seconds. No one was helping the woman lying in the crosswalk.

"It was like a terrifying version of the Mannequin Challenge," Meggett said. "Everyone was just staring and screaming, but nobody did anything. No one was next to Barb. It was the weirdest thing."

Meggett noted that Sachs was in shorts and that the pavement was scorching in the 105-degree heat. She grabbed a hoodie that was in her car, got out and dashed toward the injured woman.

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Sachs and Meggett have stayed in touch after Sachs was hit by a car in July 2016.

Meggett shaded Sachs while pulling the ice packs from her own body to place on Sachs' head, legs and chest to keep swelling down. She called 911, picking glass shards out of Sachs' curly hair while checking her pulse and saying to her, "If you can hear me, stay with me, please."

Paramedics pulled up in an ambulance and took over. Meggett gathered up Sachs' Scrunchie, credit cards, wallet, keys and earbuds off the ground and handed them to a paramedic. She noticed Sachs' striking aqua-colored eyes when a paramedic lifted an eyelid to check her pupil.

Recovery

Sachs had lived in Los Angeles only three months before she was injured. She moved from Minnesota to be near her son, Jake. She has a rare blood disease called polycythemia vera, a slow-growing cancer that causes the bone marrow to make too many red blood cells. The condition can thicken the blood and cause clots.

Soon after arriving in L.A., Sachs visited a couple of hematologists, including one at Cedars-Sinai, looking for someone to help manage her treatment. That visit with a Cedars-Sinai doctor would help save her life. Staff in the emergency room checked her electronic medical record and were alerted that she had the disease.

The information prompted Michael Alexander, MD, director of the Neurovascular Center and Endovascular Neurology, to give Sachs an infusion of platelets at the time of her emergency surgery.

After nearly three weeks in the hospital, Sachs was released to a rehabilitation program and told to brace for an 18-month recovery in a facility with round-the-clock care.

Sachs has been involved in cognitive therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy. She also has been exercising and taking walks on her own — never with her cellphone in hand or anything that could distract her. She started with 15-minute walks a couple of times a day, then worked up to two miles. And on Alexander's advice, she's now reading more to exercise her brain.

"I encourage people recovering from brain injuries to do things that challenge or work their brain, such as reading or puzzles," Alexander said. "For a muscle to recover after injury, it requires progressive therapy to improve strength and endurance. I believe the brain is the same. If you don't use it, you lose it."

Reunited

About three months after the rescue, Meggett and Sachs were able to meet again. Meggett tracked down Sachs on Facebook.

"I couldn't stop hugging her and I couldn't stop crying," Meggett said.

The two live close to each other in Valley Village. Since the reunion, they've become friends. They often lunch together and text each other.

"She will be in my life for the rest of my life," Sachs said.

It was lucky, Alexander said, that Meggett had ice and put it on Sachs' head at the scene of the incident.

"There's some preliminary information that low temperature can protect the brain," Alexander said. "It's difficult to say whether this had an impact on Barb, but it was very insightful on the part of Keta."

Sachs is grateful that she ended up at Cedars-Sinai, even though other hospitals were closer to the scene where she was struck. She has returned to the intensive care unit to visit the nurses and others who took care of her.

She hopes to see them again, and to become a volunteer herself.

"From the people who work at the desks on every floor in the towers, to the doctors and nurses, the valet people on the ramps and the staff on the patient floors — the kindness of everyone is amazing," she said. "I've never experienced anything else like it in my life."


In July 2010, Cedars-Sinai launched The Campaign for Cedars-Sinai — the organization's most ambitious fundraising effort to date with a goal of raising $600 million by June 2018 to help build and advance its research, academic and patient-care programs. The Gratitude effort aims to bolster contributions in the campaign's final months by highlighting stories of gratitude from patients, families, donors and employees.

Help us spread the word! Use #CedarsGratitude and share why you are grateful for Cedars-Sinai. About 75 percent of Cedars-Sinai's donors are grateful patients. Showing your support for Cedars-Sinai through social networks is a powerful way to spread the word about Cedars-Sinai's mission to provide excellent patient care and discover lifesaving treatments.

To learn more about The Campaign for Cedars-Sinai and how you can help, visit giving.cedars-sinai.edu.

To learn more about the Gratitude effort or to share your story, visit the #CedarsGratitude giving page.

CS Joins Effort to Promote Physician Wellbeing

Cedars-Sinai is participating in a national effort to encourage a culture of wellbeing in the clinical learning environment.

The wellness subcommittee of the Graduate Medical Education Committee held its first monthly meeting about the national campaign in June to develop plans for resident wellbeing. The Cedars-Sinai group will collaborate with other hospitals from across the country to create and implement programs to help fight the growing nationwide problem of physician burnout and depression.

The Cedars-Sinai group joins a national initiative about wellbeing in the clinical learning environment, which is sponsored by the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers, a national membership organization of independent teaching hospitals based in Chicago.

For additional information about the subcommittee's work, please contact Betsy McGaughey, EdD, MS, associate director of Graduate Medical Education, betsy.mcgaughey@cshs.org.

Epidemiologist Haile Joins Cancer Institute

Epidemiologist Robert Haile, DrPH, has joined the faculty of the Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. The research scientist also will serve as associate director for Translational Population Science.

Most recently a professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, Haile brings to Cedars-Sinai his research expertise in cancer, including several international, multi-institutional studies of breast and colorectal cancer.

"Robert will help solidify our program in areas of cancer epidemiology and cancer health disparities and genetics," said Marc Goodman, PhD, professor of Medicine, director of Cancer Prevention and Control and director of the Community and Population Health Research Center in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Cedars-Sinai. "He will be a great senior leader here at the cancer institute."

Among a number of significant achievements, Haile founded the Latin American Cancer Epidemiology consortium, whose members include Spain, Puerto Rico, Brazil and Argentina. The group’s goals include trying to reduce the burden of cancer in Latin America and facilitating research in translational genomics and behavioral sciences intervention research.

Haile says he’s excited to work with a collaborative team of physicians and scientists.

"Cedars-Sinai clearly values translational research that will have a positive impact on clinical or public health practice," he added.

Circle of Friends Honorees for July

The Circle of Friends program honored 85 people in July.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

  • David E. Aftergood, MD
  • Annie Aivazian, RN
  • Ria Aldanese, BSN, RN
  • Thais Aliabadi, MD
  • Carrie M. Allen, LCSW, ACM
  • Angel S. Amador, CP
  • Paula J. Anastasia, MN, RN, AOCN
  • Babak R. Bamshad, MD
  • Terry Barnes
  • Eli M. Baron, MD
  • Sameer K. Berry, MD
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD, FACC
  • Brendan J. Carroll, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • George Chaux, MD, FCCP
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Susan A. Creel
  • Ana Maricel D. Cruz, RN, ANCC
  • Cynthia N. De Guzman
  • Pedro G. Delgado
  • Premal J. Desai, MD
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • David M. Filsoof, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Srinivas Gaddam, MD
  • Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
  • Sara Ghandehari, MD
  • Jaime H. Goldberg
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Keith Gurtzweiler, MSN, RN, PHN
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • Bryna J. Harwood, MD
  • Carlos H. Hernandez, CP
  • Jamie Holzmann, LCSW
  • Joseph Isaacson, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Calvin Johnson, MD
  • Neel R. Joshi, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Tina Kiani
  • Dennis H. Kim, MD
  • Evan P. Kransdorf, MD, PhD
  • Yong-Jian Lin, MD
  • Marisol Luna, RN
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Harumi O. Mankarios, RN, OCN
  • Karizza T. McAlexander, RN
  • Heather L. Mcarthur, MD, MPH
  • Sharron L. Mee, MD, FACS
  • Dorothy T. Melvin
  • Tamar Meszaros, MD
  • Becky J. Miller, MD
  • Alain C. Mita, MD
  • Charles N. Moon, MD
  • Reiad Najjar, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Farshid Nejad, DPM
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Felicia T. Patterson
  • Aaron M. Perlmutter, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS
  • Kate Pivoriunas, RN
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Lina Quintanilla
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Erin L. Reeve, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Marikit V. Santiago, BSN, RN
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD
  • Rose M. Solomon, RN
  • Megan M. Thomas
  • Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS
  • Leo Treyzon, MD, MS
  • Mark K. Urman, MD, FACC, FASE, FAHA
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Andrei Vlad, BS, RTT
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD, FCCP
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Robert N. Wolfe, MD, FCCP
  • Marcos Yohannes, RN
  • Christopher Zarembinski, MD

Sand 'N' Snore Set for Sept. 8

A photo from a previous Sand 'N' Snore.

Sand 'N' Snore is just around the corner.

The dinner, sleepover and breakfast starts Friday, Sept. 8, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. Those who don't want to sleep on the sand are welcome to enjoy dinner and the evening with colleagues and their families. There's a limit of one tent per physician.

Tickets for the whole event are $65 per adult and $45 for each child age 3-11. Tickets for Friday's dinner only are $50 per adult and $25 for each child 3-11.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne, in the office of Marjorie Santore Besson, at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

Walter E. Berman, MD: 1923-2017

Walter E. Berman, MD, one of the founding members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, died on July 24. He was 94.

Berman, an otolaryngologist, began his career in 1954 at Cedars of Lebanon and Mount Sinai hospitals before their merger, and later continued to practice at Cedars-Sinai for decades. He also was one of the five founding members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

During World War II, Berman served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a flight surgeon and went on to complete his training in ear, nose and throat and plastic surgery at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City.

Berman is survived by his two children, Andrew Berman and Ellen Flashman, their spouses, Erin Berman and Tom Flashman, and four grandchildren, Sophia, Alexsa, Jason and Allison.

Donations in his memory may be made to the American Civil Liberties Union, the Southern Poverty Law Center and the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

New Online CME Course on Treating IBD Patients

The Cedars-Sinai Center for Outcomes Research and Education and the Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) have developed a new online course for clinicians treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

The care of the patients with IBD is complex, with treatment options allowing for differing treatment strategies. The online CME activity is designed to aid clinicians who treat patients with IBD in identifying what matters most (i.e., mode of administration, effectiveness, etc.) to IBD patients when they decide among the different biologics.

The initiative was led by Brennan Spiegel, MD, and Christopher V. Almario, MD. The online course is free, thanks to an educational grant from Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A. Inc.

The course is now available through the CME portal.

For more information, contact cme@cshs.org.

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

CS-Link Tip: Laboratory Culture Reports

Many physicians have asked for a clearer view of laboratory culture reports and they are available in CS-Link™. First-time users will need to add the report to their summary toolbar using the wrench. Once done, the report will be a click away.

HealthStream offers physician efficiency training modules for continuing medical education credit. There are 22 modules that last 15 minutes each. They include topics such as "In Basket Quick Actions," "Smart Blocks in Progress Notes" and "SmartList Editor."

To take advantage, log into HealthStream and search the catalog using keywords: PET CME. Select the module you want to view, then click "Enroll."

CSLink tip- Physician Efficiency Training  

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.