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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF May 19, 2017 | Archived Issues

Cedars-Sinai, Torrance Memorial Plan Affiliation

A message from Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai

Over the past several years, Cedars-Sinai has initiated numerous innovative partnerships, affiliations and other working relationships with a variety of healthcare providers to help enhance access, coordination and quality of care for patients throughout the region. These have taken many different forms, including partnerships with UCLA and Select Medical (California Rehabilitation Institute), primary care and specialty medical groups joining Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, the purchase of Marina Del Rey Hospital, and a variety of other clinical and research relationships with organizations.

I am now pleased to announce plans for a formal affiliation between Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial.

» Read more

Blood-Brain Barrier Linked to Neuron Disorder

Svendsen and Vatine co

Scientists for the first time have assembled a "disease in a dish" model that pinpoints how a defect in the blood-brain barrier can produce an incurable psychomotor disorder, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The findings point to a path for treating this syndrome and hold promise for analyzing other neurological diseases. Clive Svendsen, PhD, was a senior author, and Gad Vatine, PhD, was the first author of the study, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

» Read more

Ebinger and Xie Win Clinical Fellows Award

Finalists for the 2017 Cedars-Sinai co

Joseph Ebinger, MD, and Yu Xie, MD, have a lot in common. Both are third-year cardiology fellows at Cedars-Sinai and serve as chief fellows. And on May 3, both won the 2017 Cedars-Sinai Clinical Fellows Award for Excellence in Research. The annual award is designed to foster clinical and translational research and encourage the development of future clinical investigators.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for April

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 208 people in April. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Charlton Represents AAOS in Advocacy Trip to DC

Representing the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Timothy P. Charlton, MD, traveled to Washington last month to advocate for more government funding for medical research. Charlton was among dozens of physicians, researchers and patient supporters who visited with congressional leaders in the nation's capital to seek a $2 billion increase for the National Institutes of Health.

» Read more

FDA Eliminates Risk Evaluations for ESA Agents

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently eliminated the risk evaluation and mitigation strategy for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which includes Epogen®, Procrit® and Aranesp®.

» Read more

FDA Issues Warning Against Canagliflozin

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning Type 2 diabetes patients who take canagliflozin that the medicine can cause an increased risk of leg and foot amputations. Two recent large clinical trials showed that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients treated with canagliflozin than in patients treated with a placebo.

» Read more

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and a special musical guest, Grammy-winning a cappella group Pentatonix. The event on Monday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $140 per adult and $70 per child 3-11 years of age.

» Read more

Send Your Trainee Anecdotes to Discoveries

We are interested in stories about your early days as a resident or trainee. Do you remember any exciting, scary or unexpected moments? We will gather these anecdotes for a story in Discoveries magazine, Cedars-Sinai's flagship publication about medical research and its impact on patient care.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Creating SmartPhrases

cs-link logo

On CS-Link™, SmartPhrases spare you the trouble of having to type commonly used phrases over and over again. Creating a SmartPhrase is fairly simple and can be a big timesaver. Start by looking for a big green plus sign on your screen and clicking it.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai, Torrance Memorial Plan Affiliation

A message from Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai

Over the past several years, Cedars-Sinai has initiated numerous innovative partnerships, affiliations and other working relationships with a variety of healthcare providers to help enhance access, coordination and quality of care for patients throughout the region. These have taken many different forms, including partnerships with UCLA and Select Medical (California Rehabilitation Institute), primary care and specialty medical groups joining Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, the purchase of Marina Del Rey Hospital, and a variety of other clinical and research relationships with organizations.

I am now pleased to announce plans for a formal affiliation between Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial.

The proposed affiliation will provide a platform for future collaborations in primary and specialty care, expanded access to the latest clinical trials and an efficient sharing of resources among both institutions.

While the proposed affiliation has been approved by each institution’s board of directors, it will soon be submitted for review by various regulatory agencies that approve proposed affiliations of this type. The regulatory approval process is expected to take about six months.

Under the proposed affiliation, each institution will continue to have its employees and own hospital medical staff and related physician organizations, will retain its respective president and board of directors and continue to operate separately, but will affiliate under a new parent organization. The board of the parent organization will be composed of representatives from Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial.

In addition to continuing to serve as president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai, I will serve as the president and CEO of the new parent organization, to be called Cedars-Sinai Health System. Cedars-Sinai Health System will consist of two entities, Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial.

Cedars-Sinai includes the 886-bed Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the 145-bed Marina Del Rey Hospital, Cedars-Sinai Medical Network (including Cedars-Sinai Medical Group, Cedars-Sinai Health Associates and other groups such as Valley Internal Medicine, California Heart Center, Tower Hematology Oncology, Kerlan-Jobe Institute and The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute), our research and academic enterprise, and our growing network of primary care, urgent care and specialty care centers throughout the Los Angeles region.

Torrance Memorial includes the 470-bed Torrance Memorial Medical Center, a multispecialty physician group (Torrance Memorial Physician Network), an independent physician association (Torrance Health IPA) and an accountable care organization (Torrance Memorial Integrated Physicians), which collectively include more than 500 physicians. Torrance Memorial also has several outpatient centers located throughout the South Bay region.

Along with Cedars-Sinai, Torrance Memorial (founded in 1925) is one of California’s longest-serving nonprofit healthcare organizations and has an outstanding track record of providing quality care for the South Bay. In the past several years, Cedars-Sinai has collaborated with Torrance Memorial on a variety of projects such as the establishment of a telestroke program to more quickly diagnose and treat stroke patients and a proposed partnership involving their cancer program. The relationship has been very positive and constructive for both institutions and has enhanced access for patients. While Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial are very different in size and scope of services, both institutions have a longstanding commitment to serving the community.

The proposed affiliation will provide additional ways for all of us at Cedars-Sinai and at Torrance Memorial to fulfill the reason we come to work each day: to continually improve the lives of the people and communities we serve. Thank you for your continued commitment and dedication to our mission.

Blood-Brain Barrier Linked to Neuron Disorder

Svendsen

Clive Svendsen, PhD

Gad Vatine

Gad Vatine, PhD

Scientists for the first time have assembled a "disease in a dish" model that pinpoints how a defect in the blood-brain barrier can produce an incurable psychomotor disorder, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The findings point to a path for treating this syndrome and hold promise for analyzing other neurological diseases.

The blood-brain barrier, formed by blood vessels, protects the brain from toxins circulating in the body's blood system. It also can keep out therapeutic drugs and, when defective, biomolecules that are needed for healthy brain development. The latter is what happens in Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, according to investigators from Cedars-Sinai and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The rare, congenital syndrome causes cognitive disability, impaired speech and underdeveloped muscles, among other symptoms.

Clive Svendsen, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, said the model developed by the collaborative team's study, published May 16 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, may shed light on other neurological conditions that involve possible dysfunctions in the blood-brain barrier. These conditions include Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease, which together affect millions worldwide.

A related paper involving Svendsen, his colleague Gad Vatine, PhD, and a team from University of California, Irvine, used a similar approach to study Huntington's disease. It was published the same day in the journal Cell Reports.

"This model could have far-reaching implications to advance the understanding and treatment of neurological disorders," said Svendsen, senior author of the Cell Stem Cell study.

To develop their "disease in a dish" model, the team took skin cells from patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and reprogrammed them into induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be developed into any type of tissue in the body. Using these cells, the team modeled the patients' neurons and blood-brain barrier in a laboratory dish.

"To our surprise, the neurons were normal," said Vatine, a postdoctoral scientist in Svendsen's laboratory and first author of the study. "But the blood-brain barrier was not."

The dish model showed that the thyroid hormone, which is critical to neuron development, wasn't getting into the brain. This hormone requires a biomolecule to transport it across the blood-brain barrier. Due to a gene mutation in Allan-Herndon-Dudley patients, there was not enough of the biomolecule in the barrier to do the job.

"The blood-brain barrier forms pretty early in gestation, so the thyroid hormone, even from the mother, is probably not getting through the barrier and into the brain, likely leading to developmental deficits," said Eric Shusta, a professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a senior author of the study.

One potential way to treat Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, based on this model, may be to develop an artificial version of the thyroid hormone that does not need the biomolecule to cross the blood-brain barrier, Vatine said. It also may be possible in the future to repair the gene mutation using gene-editing technology, which the investigators were able to do in the laboratory dish, he added.

Research reported in this publication was supported by grants from the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute and the National Institutes of Health under award numbers NS083688, AA020476, NS085351 and R37DK15070.

The IRB number for human subjects in research referenced in this article is 21505.

Ebinger and Xie Win Clinical Fellows Award

Finalists for the 2017 Cedars-Sinai Clinical Fellows Award

Finalists for the 2017 Cedars-Sinai Clinical Fellows Award (from left): Richard Cheng, MD; Gaurav Syal, MD; Joseph Ebinger, MD; and Yu Xie, MD.

Joseph Ebinger, MD, and Yu Xie, MD, have a lot in common. Both are third-year cardiology fellows at Cedars-Sinai and serve as chief fellows. And on May 3, both won the 2017 Cedars-Sinai Clinical Fellows Award for Excellence in Research.

The annual award is designed to foster clinical and translational research and encourage the development of future clinical investigators, said Mariko Ishimori, MD, who welcomed attendees to the awards ceremony in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion. Ishimori, assistant professor of Medicine and interim director of the Division of Rheumatology, is the Cedars-Sinai site co-leader of the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

A panel of Cedars-Sinai expert investigators chose Ebinger and Xie for the honor from among four finalists who delivered oral presentations on their research.

Ebinger's winning study was designed to improve the clinical outcomes and reduce the costs of cardiac care. He focused on percutaneous coronary intervention, also called coronary angioplasty, a procedure to improve blood flow to the heart. With an eye toward preventing bleeding — the procedure’s most common complication — Ebinger integrated a calculator into the electronic medical record of Cedars-Sinai patients who underwent the procedure, enabling physicians to project each patient's bleeding risk.

Flagging high-risk patients, Ebinger reasoned, would increase the use of bleeding-avoidance strategies, resulting in fewer bleeding events, lower mortality and lower costs. The study found this to be the case.

Ebinger pointed to these findings as an example of value-based care. "More and more, doctors are being looked to, not only for providing quality care, but also for providing care that is a good value," he said. Ebinger's mentors were Timothy Henry, MD, professor of Medicine and director of the Cedars-Sinai Division of Cardiology, and Teryl Nuckols, MD, MSHS, director of the Division of General Internal Medicine in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine.

Xie, in her winning study, focused on heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction, a condition in which the heart pumps ineffectively. These patients face high mortality and hospital readmission rates, largely because current diagnostic tools cannot determine which patients have the weakest heart muscles. Xie's research tackled this void.

With the aim of developing a new cardiac biomarker for heart health, she collected blood from patients in the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute's Heart Failure Program to assess if levels of cardiac BIN1, a protein that regulates the heart's ability to contract, were different in patients with reduced ejection fraction versus healthy volunteers.

Xie found that cardiac BIN1 levels were overall lower in the patients and, within the patient group, a low level of cardiac BIN1 predicted a heart-related hospitalization within the next 18 months. "Consequently, cardiac BIN1 can now be used to reliably predict which patients with reduced ejection fraction are at high risk for future hospitalization," Xie said. "This information can inform treatment plans, such as pursuing advanced therapies sooner."

Xie's mentor was Robin M. Shaw, MD, PhD, the Cedars-Sinai Wasserman Chair in Cardiology in honor of S. Rexford Kennamer, MD.

Each winner received a $3,000 cash prize funded by the Burns and Allen Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai and the Cedars-Sinai site of the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

The two other award finalists were Richard Cheng, MD, who presented "Angiogenesis on Coronary Angiography Is a Marker for Accelerated Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy as Assessed by Intravascular Ultrasound: A Potential New Therapeutic Pathway," and Gaurav Syal, MD, who presented "Pharmacokinetic Effect of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Agents on Thiopurine Drug Metabolism in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases."

For more information about the Clinical Fellows Award, contact Jonathan Hackmeyer, CTSI management assistant, at 310-423-8965.

The IRB number for human subjects in research referenced in this article is 32242.

Circle of Friends Honorees for April

The Circle of Friends program honored 208 people in April.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Hamed Afshari, RN
  • Ericson A. Aguilar
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Ronald M. Andiman, MD
  • Ellen Anifantis, LCSW
  • Christine T. Armbruster, PharmD
  • Claudia Arrue, RN
  • David Austin, MD
  • Esther Baik, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Benjamin Basseri, MD
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Vivien S. Bonert, MD
  • Catherine E. Boyer, RN
  • Darina Brezhnev, PharmD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Rebecca S. Brown, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD
  • Michael A. Bush, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Peter Chen, MD
  • Elaina P. Chu, PA
  • Sumeet S. Chugh, MD
  • Jeffrey M. Chung, MD
  • Joshua Chung, MD
  • Hart C. Cohen, MD
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Yvonne M. Concepcion, RN
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Kenneth A. Corre, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Onika Davis, RN
  • Julie DeMary
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • Jack Ditlove, MD
  • Suhail Dohad, MD
  • Cory A. Donovan, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Hailu Ebba, MD
  • Christine H. Economides, MD
  • Karyn Eilber, MD
  • Yaron Elad, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Edward J. Feldman, MD
  • Christopher R. Fitzgerald, MD
  • Lauren J. Fitzpatrick
  • Phillip R. Fleshner, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Alex Foxman, MD
  • David M. Frisch, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Srinivas Gaddam, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Jordan L. Geller, MD
  • Sabrina L. Gerber, RN
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • David B. Golden, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Sarah Gordon-Harper, RN
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Amanda Ruth O. Goyena, RN
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Leland M. Green, MD
  • Giselle A. Guevara, RN
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Matthew Hakimi, MD
  • David S. Hallegua, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Bryna J. Harwood, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Helfenstein, MD
  • Heather Henry Barone, BSN, RN-BC, CCRN
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Gary H. Hoffman, MD
  • David D. Hopp, MD
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD
  • Bree Hysjulien
  • Titus Jackson, PA
  • Jay L. Jordan, MD
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD
  • Payman Khorrami, MD
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Glenda Y. Lam
  • Todd H. Lanman, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Mary Leier, NP
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael S. Levine, MD
  • Richard A. Lewis, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Burt Liebross, MD
  • Milton Little, MD
  • Cheryle C. Maano-Requejo
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Leticia Martinez
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • David N. Matsumura, MD
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS
  • Nicolas Melo, MD
  • Leslie Memsic, MD
  • Robert Meth, MD
  • Avinash Mondkar, MD
  • Reanna Moon, RN
  • Beth A. Moore, MD
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Esther Morrison, RN
  • Ariella A. Morrow, MD
  • Jeannette Moynihan, RN
  • Zuri Murrell, MD
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Youram Nassir, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Ronen Nazarian, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Arshia M. Noori, MD
  • Katayoun Omrani, DDS
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Alice Peng, MD
  • Brian Perri, DO
  • Tiffany Perry, MD
  • Surasak Phuphanich, MD
  • Nipaporn Pichetshote, MD
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Stephen C. Rabin, MD
  • Edwin O. Ramos
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Jeffrey Rapp, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Robert Richter, MD
  • Sonja Louisa Rosen, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • James Round, RN
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Ruth "Virginia" Russell, MD
  • Amy S. Rutman, MD
  • Rachelle Sanchez
  • Annette E. Sand, PT
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • John L. Sherman, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Chrisandra L. Shufelt, MD, MS
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Amanuel Sima, MD
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Isabelle Soh, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Janet Soto
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Henrietta Stancz-Szeder, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Charles D. Swerdlow, MD
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Alfiya Tuaeva, RN
  • Kathleen Valenton, MD
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Ronald G. Victor, MD
  • Olga Voroshilovsky, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Victor Washington, RN
  • Katherine Weber, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Janet Y. White, MD
  • Alyssa Wield, MD
  • Yu-Tung Wong, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Jacqueline E. Yaris, MD
  • Payam R. Yashar, MD
  • Evan M. Zahn, MD
  • Phillip C. Zakowski, MD
  • Zachary Zumsteg, MD

Charlton Represents AAOS in Advocacy Trip to DC

Representing the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Timothy P. Charlton, MD, traveled to Washington last month to advocate for more government funding for medical research.

Charlton was among dozens of physicians, researchers and patient supporters who visited with congressional leaders in the nation's capital to seek a $2 billion increase for the National Institutes of Health. Charlton and the group, which also voiced opposition to recent proposals to reduce research funding, told congressional leaders that for every dollar spent on research, there is a $5 return.

Charlton is a foot and ankle surgeon with the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center.

FDA Eliminates Risk Evaluations for ESA Agents

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently eliminated the risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA), which includes Epogen®, Procrit® and Aranesp®.

Established in 2011, the REMS program was designed to ensure that the benefits of ESA therapy to treat anemia due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy outweighed the risks. After further study, the FDA determined in April that the REMS program is no longer necessary.

The elimination of the ESA Apprise Oncology REMS program means:

  • Prescribers are no longer required to be certified before being able to prescribe ESA for patients with anemia due myelosuppressive chemotherapy.
  • Prescribers are no longer required to complete a Patient and Healthcare Provider Acknowledgement Form for each patient before a new ESA course is initiated.
  • Hospitals are no longer required to be certified before being able to dispense ESA for patients with anemia due myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

Prescribers should continue to follow clinical guidelines and hospital protocols when prescribing ESA.

For more information or questions, please contact Drug Use Policy (grouppharmacydup@cshs.org).

FDA Issues Warning Against Canagliflozin

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning Type 2 diabetes patients who take canagliflozin that the medicine can cause an increased risk of leg and foot amputations.

Two recent large clinical trials showed that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients treated with canagliflozin as in patients treated with a placebo.

Patients taking canagliflozin should contact their healthcare provider immediately if new pain, tenderness, sores, ulcers, or infections develop in the legs or feet.

The FDA website has more information.

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Hollywood Bowl 2015

The Hollywood Bowl

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and a special musical guest, Grammy-winning a cappella group Pentatonix.

The event on Monday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $140 per adult and $70 per child 3-11 years of age.

Parking passes also are available. Valet is $50, lower terrace is $21.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

Send Your Trainee Anecdotes to Discoveries

We are interested in stories about your early days as a resident or trainee. Do you remember any exciting, scary or unexpected moments? What stood out about your first day in the lab or first interaction with a patient? We will gather these anecdotes for a story in Discoveries magazine, Cedars-Sinai's flagship publication about medical research and its impact on patient care. Please send your memories to sarah.spivacklarosa@cshs.org or call ext. 6-8796. Thank you!

CS-Link Tip: Creating SmartPhrases

On CS-Link™, SmartPhrases spare you the trouble of having to type commonly used phrases over and over again.

Creating a SmartPhrase is fairly simple and can be a big timesaver. Start by looking for a big green plus sign on your screen and clicking it. The SmartPhrase editor opens with your text and you can make additional edits.

Next, give your SmartPhrase a nickname so it will be easy to retrieve later. Then, click Accept and your SmartPhrase is now stored in CS-Link™. (It will work in both ambulatory and inpatient notes.)