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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF September 22, 2017 | Archived Issues

Chief Medical Officer Langberg to Retire

michael langberg co

After 38 years of extraordinary service to Cedars-Sinai and working closely with our medical staff, Board leadership, nursing and others to build Cedars-Sinai's nationally recognized performance in quality and safety, Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer Michael Langberg, MD, has informed me of his plans to begin his retirement on May 1, 2018. He has agreed to remain in a part-time consulting capacity through October.

» Read more

Flu Shot Clinics Set Through Next Week

Flu shots co

Help Cedars-Sinai protect its patients, visitors and staff by getting a flu vaccination by Wednesday, Nov. 1. All employees, medical staff, vendors, contracted personnel, volunteers, faculty and students must get their annual flu vaccination. These are free of charge and available through scheduled flu clinics.

» Read more

Ravi Thadhani Named Vice Dean

Ravi Thadhani co

Ravi Thadhani, MD, MPH, has been appointed vice dean of Research and Education. Thadhani is a highly accomplished investigator, scholar educator and leading clinician who is a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the Division of Nephrology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

» Read more

Symposium: Getting Real About Virtual Reality

Registration has opened for a March symposium and hands-on workshop at Cedars-Sinai that will focus on how to integrate virtual reality technology into patient care. Target audiences include clinicians, patients, hospital staff, industry leaders, researchers, investors and journalists.

» Read more

Precision Health Project Proposals Due Oct. 6

Cedars-Sinai Precision Health has issued a request for proposals to fund Cedars-Sinai investigators in 2017-18. This initiative aims to drive the development of the newest technology and best research, coupled with the finest clinical practice, to deliver precise and personalized healthcare solutions rapidly to Cedars-Sinai patients. Summary proposal applications must be submitted by Friday, Oct. 6.

» Read more

A Life in a Day – Gabriel Goldberg

Last Labor Day weekend, Gabriel Goldberg suffered a severe stroke while working out at his Beverly Hills gym. He was rushed to Cedars-Sinai, home to one of three comprehensive stroke programs in Southern California, where a sophisticated procedure saved his life. Today, the energetic 44-year-old photographer has returned to an active, full life.

» Read more

Novel Pulmonary Heart Valve Device in Trial

Zahn co

Evan Zahn, MD, a Cedars-Sinai interventional cardiologist, has performed the first minimally invasive procedure using a device that could spare patients with a common congenital heart defect from undergoing multiple open-heart surgeries. The defect is a malformed pulmonary valve, which often acts as a blockage that prevents the flow of blood through the heart.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 72 people in August. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Core Labs Moving Tests to Abbott Platforms

To improve efficiency, the Core laboratories in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is moving a number of tests to Abbott platforms beginning Tuesday, Oct. 10.

» Read more

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

See product information updates for September from Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Setting Up a Problem List

cs-link logo

CS-Link™ can show you the problems that are pertinent to your care. The list will sort by a physiologic system when you choose "System" for your list view.

» Read more

Chief Medical Officer Langberg to Retire

From Thomas M. Priselac,
President and CEO

michael langberg 140px

Michael Langberg, MD, chief medical officer

After 38 years of extraordinary service to Cedars-Sinai and working closely with our Medical Staff, Board leadership, nursing and others to build Cedars-Sinai's nationally recognized performance in quality and safety, Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer Michael Langberg, MD, has informed me of his plans to begin his retirement on May 1, 2018. He has agreed to remain in a part-time consulting capacity through October.

The most significant contributions that any leader makes are reflected in the organization's culture. Even more than Dr. Langberg's numerous accomplishments, Cedars-Sinai's culture of quality and safety will stand for decades as the legacy of Michael's leadership. Open and candid with his perspective, Michael always has put the institution's needs first and always preferred that others get the credit for successes he helped achieve.

Michael first joined Cedars-Sinai in 1979 as a resident in Internal Medicine. In 1983, he was named director of Medical Education and assistant director of Professional Services. He was appointed chief medical officer in 1994 and developed a consolidated Division of Medical Affairs, integrating clinical quality and safety with medical staff leadership and senior management. In that role for the past 23 years, Michael has evolved the role of Medical Affairs as healthcare has changed and as Cedars-Sinai has grown. Today, Medical Affairs represents leadership across the organization in quality, patient safety, bioethics, healthcare epidemiology, performance improvement, clinical analytics and provider credentialing.

Michael also is recognized for his leadership and insights in representing Cedars-Sinai at the state and national levels. He frequently is sought for his expert advice in healthcare quality and safety, including the role of physician performance in achieving outstanding outcomes.

We are planning an event to enable all of us to thank Michael for his contributions to Cedars-Sinai, and for his leadership, integrity, collegiality and friendship over the years. Details will follow, as will information regarding the search process to identify his successor.

Please join me in thanking Michael for the indelible impact his extraordinary contributions have made to Cedars-Sinai.

Flu Shot Clinics Set Through Next Week

Flu shots 220pxHelp Cedars-Sinai protect its patients, visitors and staff by getting a flu vaccination by Wednesday, Nov. 1.

All employees, medical staff, vendors, contracted personnel, volunteers, faculty and students must get their annual flu vaccination. These are free of charge and available through scheduled vaccination clinics:

  • Monday, Sept. 25, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Tuesday, Sept. 26, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Wednesday, Sept. 27, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Thursday, Sept. 28, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 3
  • Friday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ECC-A

Additional clinics are being scheduled. Weekly updates will be published in The Bridge and on the intranet homepage.

Exceptions may be given for those with approved medical exemptions, per guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Those who decline the vaccine without an approved medical exemption or religious accommodation will not be able to work and are subject to termination of employment.

Green badge buddies will be issued at the time of vaccination, and people with an approved medical exemption or religious accommodation will receive a gray badge buddy. All badge buddies must be visibly worn by Nov. 1.

For questions, call Employee Health Services at 310-423-3322 or Hospital Epidemiology at 310-423-5574. You also can access a set of frequently asked questions about vaccinations here:  2017-18 Influenza Immunization Policy Frequently Asked Questions (PDF)

Family members of employees are invited to get free vaccines at the employee family flu and blood pressure screening on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on the second floor of the Steven Spielberg Building.

For more information, call 310-423-9581.

Ravi Thadhani Named Vice Dean

By Shlomo Melmed, MD,
Executive vice president, Academic Affairs, dean, Medical Faculty

Ravi Thadhani 220pxI am delighted to announce the appointment of Ravi Thadhani, MD, MPH, as vice dean of Research and Education. Dr. Thadhani is a highly accomplished investigator, scholar educator and leading clinician who brings his considerable leadership skills to enrich our academic enterprise.

Dr. Thadhani currently is professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the Division of Nephrology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He also is executive director of the Clinical Trials Office at Partners Healthcare in Boston. At Partners Healthcare, he streamlined the initiation and implementation of industry‐sponsored trials at five member hospitals and worked to build an efficient infrastructure for industry partnerships and to engage patients in clinical research.

Dr. Thadhani has demonstrated remarkable scholarly creativity, coupled with outstanding mentoring of trainees and junior faculty. He is an internationally renowned clinical and translational leader in nephrology, heading a highly productive research laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital, with more than 250 publications in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and The Lancet, among other top‐tier scientific journals. As a world‐renowned expert on Vitamin D metabolism, kidney dialysis and preeclampsia, he has been principal investigator or co‐principal investigator for more than 30 grants, many funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Thadhani has supervised more than two dozen postdoctoral fellows, many of whom now hold tenured faculty positions in departments of medicine at prestigious U.S. institutions. He has led significant diversity initiatives and has advanced women and underrepresented minorities in career development and academic medicine pathways.

Dr. Thadhani has received prestigious awards, including the Harvard Medical School Harold Amos Faculty Diversity Award; the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit; the Shaul Massry Distinguished Lecture Award from the National Kidney Foundation; and the Robert W. Schrier Endowed Lectureship from the American Society of Nephrology. As a reflection of his highest peer recognition, he is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians.

Raised on Guam, he is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude), received his doctor of medicine degree in 1991 from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and completed his postdoctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital. He received his master of public health in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1997.

Please join me in extending our congratulations and in welcoming Dr. Ravi Thadhani to this important leadership position at Cedars‐Sinai.

Symposium: Getting Real About Virtual Reality

Registration has opened for a symposium and hands-on workshop March 28-29 at Cedars-Sinai that will focus on how to integrate virtual reality technology into patient care. Target audiences include clinicians, patients, hospital staff, industry leaders, researchers, investors and journalists.

The symposium, "Virtual Medicine: Best Practices in Medical Virtual Reality," was developed by the virtual reality clinical research team at Cedars-Sinai through the Division of Health Services Research. "This meeting will convene top experts to discuss the rapid advances in delivering low-cost, portable, high-quality virtual reality experiences to patients," said Brennan Spiegel, MD, director of Cedars-Sinai Health Services Research and the Cedars-Sinai Center for Outcomes Research and Education.

Virtual reality technology, which has been studied in various medical settings, offers immersive, multisensory environments that can improve patients' mental states by transporting them away from their immediate physical setting. It has been studied in various medical settings. In one such study, Spiegel, a professor of Medicine, and his team demonstrated that viewing scenic videos through virtual reality goggles helped decrease pain by 24 percent in hospitalized patients.

Symposium participants will:

  • Review evidence supporting the efficacy of medical virtual reality
  • Learn best practices and pragmatic tips for implementing virtual reality into clinical workflows
  • Discuss the cost-effectiveness of such programs
  • Hear from patients who have received virtual reality therapeutics
  • Study patient vignettes, in which virtual reality worked and didn't work, to learn how to improve outcomes

The keynote speeches will be presented by David Rhew, MD, MSHS, chief medical officer at Samsung Electronics America; and Daniel Kraft, MD, chair of Medicine and Neuroscience at the Singularity University think tank. Other symposium speakers will include Spiegel; Itai Danovitch, MD, MBA, chair of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Psychiatry; Kim Bullock, MD, director of the Neurobehavioral and Virtual Reality clinics at Stanford University; and Jeffrey Gold, PhD, director of the Pediatric Pain Management Clinic at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

Registration fees range from $99 to $499, depending on the category of participant and date of registration. Cedars-Sinai employees are eligible for discounted fees. For the lowest prices, register by Sept. 30.

To register or for more information, visit the Virtual Medicine website.

Precision Health Project Proposals Due Oct. 6

Cedars-Sinai Precision Health has issued a request for proposals to fund Cedars-Sinai investigators in 2017-18. This initiative aims to drive the development of the newest technology and best research, coupled with the finest clinical practice, to deliver precise and personalized healthcare solutions rapidly to Cedars-Sinai patients.

Summary proposal applications, including a single-page summary proposal, must be submitted by Friday, Oct. 6. About three to six grants of $50,000-$250,000 each will be awarded. All Cedars-Sinai faculty and affiliated physicians and scientists are encouraged and eligible to apply for this award.

Eligible applications should address one or more of the following Precision Health focus areas:

  • The implementation and/or evaluation of precision health solutions for a specific Cedars-Sinai patient population to improve clinical outcomes, efficiency and/or control costs
  • The development of diagnostics to stratify diverse patient phenotypes, to monitor disease transitions (including from pre-disease to disease) and/or to monitor the efficacy of therapy
  • The training of Cedars-Sinai faculty, staff, fellows and residents and/or students in precision health topic areas that are necessary to develop the workforce required to advance the goals of precision health. This focus area is new for 2017-18
  • The translation of preclinical findings into the development of novel therapeutics or therapeutic targets

This is the second round of grants to be offered under Cedars-Sinai Precision Health. The initiative last year awarded a total of $775,000 to eight projects. Applicants who were previously awarded Precision Health projects are eligible and encouraged to reapply with new projects.

Summary proposal applications and questions about this request for proposals should be submitted to precisionhealth@cshs.org. For more information, please click on the PDF link below.

Cedars-Sinai Precision Health – Request for Proposals – Oct. 6 Deadline (PDF)  

Related story:

Cedars-Sinai Launches Precision Health

A Life in a Day – Gabriel Goldberg

Nestor Gonzalez and Gabriel Goldberg 480px

Nestor Gonzalez, MD, (left) and Gabriel Goldberg mark the one-year anniversary of a lifesaving neurological procedure that restored the former Cedars-Sinai patient to good health after suffering a severe stroke.

Almost one year ago, the life of Gabriel Goldberg came down to a handful of hours at Cedars-Sinai.

Today, the energetic 44-year-old photographer — who has worked with Jennifer Lopez, Lady Gaga and Matt Damon, among others — looks like the picture of health. But last Labor Day weekend, while exercising at a Beverly Hills gym, he nearly lost everything.

Shortly into his workout, Gabriel started feeling dizzy, experiencing weakness on his right side and struggled to speak. Moments later, he felt sharp, hot pinpricks on his face. The room flipped sideways.

When an ambulance arrived, paramedics quickly surmised that Gabriel was having a stroke. They raced to Cedars-Sinai, home to one of three comprehensive stroke programs in Southern California.

Gabriel was no stranger to medical challenges. Born with a congenital heart condition, he had managed it for decades with a healthy lifestyle, medications and corrective surgeries, including one as an adult to install an artificial heart valve. But nothing prepared him for what happened on Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016.

"I had open-heart surgery when I was 31. I was ready for that," Gabriel said. "But this was like getting eaten by a shark. You are aware of what's happening and you can't stop it."

Gabriel is one of about 1,200 patients treated each year by the Cedars-Sinai Stroke Program. After an event, stroke patients like Gabriel must receive medical care within a tight window — about six hours — for the best chance of survival and preserving quality of life.

Through a review of medical records and interviews with doctors and nurses, The Pulse reconstructed a day-by-day sequence of the major events in Gabriel's care at Cedars-Sinai.

Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016

  • Gabriel is weightlifting when his symptoms appear. He dials a friend, who immediately calls for an ambulance. By the time the conversation is over, Gabriel lacks the strength to hold the phone.
  • Paramedics arrive. They note Gabriel is "foaming at the mouth" and that his eyes are moving in different directions.
  • Cedars-Sinai receives a "Code Brain" page, which mobilizes a stroke specialist team in the Emergency Department to prepare for an acute stroke patient.
  • Gabriel arrives at the Emergency Department.
  • Medical tests are immediately performed to assess Gabriel's condition and to begin developing a strategy for care. "There were seven or eight doctors and nurses yelling all around me," Gabriel recalled. "They kept asking me, 'What's your name?' 'Who is the President?' and 'How old are you?'"
  • A CT scan is performed and shows no evidence of hemorrhage. After the test, a nurse asks Gabriel what his biggest fear is. In stumbling language caused by the stroke, he replies that it is not being able to walk, talk or shoot photographs again.
  • Gabriel begins receiving a tissue plasminogen activator, a clot-busting drug administered intravenously that is commonly referred to as tPA. He initially is given 10 percent of the dose, then the remainder over the next hour.
  • A CT angiogram of the head and neck are performed. Results show significant blockages of the distal basilar artery, which supplies the brain with oxygen-rich blood.
  • The tPA intravenous drip is completed. It "steadied me," Gabriel said. "At least at this point, my symptoms weren't getting worse." The tPA is very effective at dissolving smaller clots, but often fails to break up larger ones like Gabriel's.
  • It was becoming clear that Gabriel would have to undergo a novel and highly complicated procedure called a mechanical thrombectomy. The delicate procedure, which utilizes a tiny stent retriever to remove blood clots from the brain, requires advanced neurosurgical training and sophisticated operating skills. "It's extremely difficult," said Laurie Paletz, RN, stroke program coordinator in the Department of Neurology. "It's like threading a needle where the thread keeps turning and circles around itself."
  • Nestor R. Gonzalez, MD, a nationally recognized neurosurgeon in mechanical thrombectomies, will perform the surgery.
  • Gabriel is prepped for the procedure and taken to the interventional radiology suite on the eighth floor of the Medical Center. "We have the conviction that time is brain," Gonzalez said of treating stroke patients. "You want to intervene as soon as possible for the best outcomes. Time is critical."
  • The procedure begins with the puncture of Gabriel's right femoral artery. A catheter is threaded through the artery from his groin up to the blockage in his brain. Of the precision and intense concentration required, Gonzalez made this comparison: "In the last Olympics, something about Michael Phelps before his swimming event caught my attention. He had this deep breathing. His eyes were almost in a place you couldn't see. He was clearly under stress, but it was not a bad stress. It was a stress that gave him focus. Every time we do one of these interventions, we focus in the same way. We focus on doing the best we can for the patient, and we use the stress as motivation."
  • The stent retriever opens and grabs three clots in Gabriel's brain. Tests soon confirm blood flow has been restored fully to the brain. After waking up in the Neuro Intensive Care Unit in the Saperstein Critical Care Tower, a nurse asks Gabriel his name. He replies in an uninterrupted fashion. "I thought, 'That's what I sound like,'" he said. "It was a huge relief. It was overwhelming."

Gonzalez Reunites with Stroke Patient 220px

Goldberg gives his physician a hug.

Monday, Sept. 5

  • Less than 12 hours after he suffered a life-threatening stroke, Gabriel connects via FaceTime with his parents, who live in Connecticut, and is able to explain his condition in a clear voice.

Tuesday, Sept. 6

  • Gabriel is transferred from the ICU to a non-critical care unit.

Thursday, Sept. 8

  • Gabriel is discharged from Cedars-Sinai.

Stroke survivors are often left with lasting residual damage, but Gabriel had none. Four weeks later, he returned to work and resumed his previous activities. His first photo assignment was shooting Katy Perry's birthday party.

"The biggest thing I've realized is that Dr. Gonzalez didn't just save my life," he said. "He saved my quality of life."

Novel Pulmonary Heart Valve Device in Trial

Zahn 140px

Evan Zahn, MD

A Cedars-Sinai interventional cardiologist has performed the first minimally invasive procedure using a device that could spare patients with a common congenital heart defect from undergoing multiple open-heart surgeries.

Malformed pulmonary valves are among the most common congenital heart defects and often act as a blockage that prevents the flow of blood through the heart. Babies born with defects such as Tetralogy of Fallot often have a blue tinge to their skin, indicating their blood isn't getting enough oxygen. Since the 1950s, surgeons have been able to clear the artery, but the repair often results in a leaky pulmonary valve which could require additional open-heart valve surgeries throughout a patient's life.

"These patients typically require multiple open-heart surgeries over the course of their lifetime, and in between surgeries, this condition is quietly causing significant damage to their heart that may ultimately result in heart failure and a premature death," said Evan Zahn, MD, director of the Guerin Family Congenital Heart Program in the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute. "There is a great need to find a solution we hope will yield better results, fewer repeat surgeries — and have patients going home more quickly."

With that goal in mind, Zahn recently became the first interventional cardiologist to give a patient an investigational device called the Alterra Adaptive Prestent, developed by Edwards Lifesciences. The procedure was the first in a new, early feasibility clinical trial that was approved by the FDA. Alterra is a self-expanding, stent-like implant that conforms to a wide range of pulmonary artery anatomies and can be delivered via a small incision in the leg. It is designed to reshape the right ventricular outflow tract of the heart, to provide a "landing zone" for a replacement Edwards SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve.

Zahn's patient, Cheryl Davis, 48, was the first in the world to receive the device. Born with a malformed pulmonary valve, Davis underwent her first open-heart surgery in 1978, when she was just 9 years old. Although successful, the surgery could not completely fix Davis' pulmonary valve and she was left with a significant leak, requiring close monitoring throughout her life.

Davis, an animation lighting artist, led a healthy and active life, hiking and training to be a yoga instructor. She purchased a home she's planning to open as a bed and breakfast in upstate New York. But starting about five years ago, Davis began feeling the effects of her worsening pulmonary valve leak.

"I was having more dizzy spells than normal, and more heaviness in my chest," Davis said. "And I was dreading going to the doctor because I knew it meant another open-heart surgery and everything that goes with that — pain, missing work, not being able to do the things I love doing."

But when Davis went to see Zahn, she learned that the device might fix her heart condition without open-heart surgery. She underwent the 90-minute procedure Aug. 22 and went home the next day.

"I'm so excited that this investigational treatment option was available to me," Davis said. "I'm looking forward to getting back to doing the things I love."

Zahn is the lead investigator for the multicenter, national clinical trial sponsored by Edwards. In the past, Zahn occasionally has received consulting fees from the company, but has not received any compensation for the Alterra Adaptive Prestent clinical trial.

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 72 people in August.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

  • Arash Asher, MD
  • Daniel S. Berman, MD
  • Marvalene Bickerstaff
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Blessie M. Bulaon
  • Kristi R. Butenschoen, MSN, RN, FNP-BC
  • Brendan J. Carroll, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Wendy W. Cheng, MD
  • Susan B. Clark, RN
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD, FRCPC, FACC
  • Sandra R. Elyassian, RN
  • Carrie E. Fishman, MN, RN
  • Olga Garcia
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd
  • Eskedar F. Gobeze, BSN, RN
  • Ashley Gorelik
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD, MACC, MACP, FCCP, FAHA
  • Timothy D. Henry, MD
  • Allen S. Ho, MD
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD, FACR
  • Robin R. Hudson, RN, CPAN
  • Leslie S. Johnson, MA, OTR/L
  • Sandy Y. Joung
  • Gary Leach, MD
  • Ella L. Leggett
  • Madeline S. Lerman, BSN, RN
  • Michael S. Levine, MD
  • Cynthia A. Litwer Schwieger, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Alberto J. Mallari
  • Cynthia M. Martin, LVN, CCRC
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Dorothy T. Melvin
  • Pamela A. Minosa, RN
  • Esther Morrison, RN
  • Cherise M. Mosiman
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Sarah J. Ochoa, RN
  • Fallie Palomo
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Brian Perri, MD, DO
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Paula J. Rubin
  • Amy S. Rutman, MD
  • Colleen Ryan, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC
  • Deborah Schmidt
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS
  • Gena T. Smith, RN
  • Andrew I. Spitzer, MD
  • Charles D. Swerdlow, MD
  • Sandra Tansman
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Eugene Y. Tsai, MD
  • Conrad J. Tseng, MD
  • Jennifer D. Valdez, BSN, RN
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • Jason L. Weiner
  • Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC
  • Phillip C. Zakowski, MD
  • Zachary Zumsteg, MD

Core Labs Moving Tests to Abbott Platforms

To improve efficiency, the Core laboratories in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is moving a number of tests to Abbott platforms beginning Tuesday, Oct. 10. Please note the highlighted portions of the tables below contain potentially significant biases between current and new tests and changes in reference intervals.

Tests Moving from Roche to Abbott (PDF)  

Tests Moving from Beckman to Abbott (PDF)  

The labs will also be offer rebaselining of CEA and CA 19-9 tumor markers until mid-December in case there are patients whose results are being followed.

Finally, due to low test volume, the labs will be sending out aidolase and are planning to do the same with propoxyphene.

If you have questions, please contact Kimia Sobhani, PhD, at kimia.sobhani@cshs.org.

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

Product information updates for September from Pharmacy and Therapeutics are summarized in the PDF link below.

P and T Committee Approvals - September 2017

CS-Link Tip: Setting Up a Problem List

CS-Link™ can show you the problems that are pertinent to your care. The list will sort by a physiologic system when you choose "System" for your list view.

To get there, go to the Problem List. Click the chevron (double arrow) on the top right. Then click "System" under list view.

Also, HealthStream offers physician efficiency training modules for continuing medical education credit. There are 22 modules that last 15 minutes each. They include topics such as "In Basket Quick Actions," "Smart Blocks in Progress Notes" and "SmartList Editor."

To take advantage, log into HealthStream and search the catalog using keywords: PET CME. Select the module you want to view, then click "Enroll."

CSLink tip- Physician Efficiency Training

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.