Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF July 13, 2018 | Archived Issues

Smith, MD, Appointed Executive Vice President and COO

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

Following a comprehensive national search, I am very pleased to announce the appointment of Jeffrey A. Smith, MD, JD, MMM, as executive vice president, Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Jeff, who will join Cedars-Sinai on August 27, 2018, succeeds Mark Gavens, who announced his retirement last year.

» Read more

New Jewish Advance Healthcare Directive Unveiled

Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department, oversaw the drafting of an Advance Healthcare Directive tailored to the specific needs and traditions of the region's diverse Jewish community. The Cedars-Sinai Jewish Advance Healthcare Directive is the first of what he expects will be others created here that reflect the needs of other faith traditions.

» Read more

Advancing Treatments for GI, Metabolic Issues

Cedars-Sinai has launched an initiative to accelerate the development of novel drugs, devices and therapies aimed at improving treatments for patients with gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases. Physician-scientists and others in the Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program are focusing their research expertise on disorders of the microbiome.

» Read more

Donna Dooley-Aiello, RN, Receives Nursing Honor

Donna Dooley-Aiello, RN, a clinical nurse in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion operating room, is this year’s winner of the Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award. The annual award recognizes a Cedars-Sinai nurse who represents clinical excellence, quality care and professionalism.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for June

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 161 people in June. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

New Drug Treatments for Major Depression Emerging

A powerful anesthetic called ketamine is spawning a new generation of drug treatments for depression that has shown the ability to provide fast-acting relief, according to Waguih William IsHak, MD, FAPA, professor of Psychiatry and vice chair of Education and Research at Cedars-Sinai, who recently spoke to Heathline about the benefits and risks of these drugs.

» Read more

Harold, MD, Honored by Royal College of Physicians

John Gordon Harold, MD, attending physician at the Smidt Heart Institute and former president of the American College of Cardiology, has received an honorary fellowship from the Royal College of Physicians. The honor recognizes Harold’s significant contributions to the medical profession, which include extensive work addressing the cardiovascular impacts of noncommunicable diseases.

» Read more

Annual Sand N’ Snore Set for Sept. 7

Sand N' Snore is just around the corner. The dinner, sleepover and breakfast are slated to begin Friday, Sept. 7, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

» Read more

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

See production information updates for June from Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Creating a Personal Preference List

In CS-Link™, creating a personal preference list is easy and will saves time. The list lets users customize and categorize commonly used orders.

» Read more

Smith, MD, Appointed Executive Vice President and COO

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

Jeffrey A. Smith, MD

Following a comprehensive national search, I am very pleased to announce the appointment of Jeffrey A. Smith, MD, JD, MMM, as executive vice president, Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Jeff, who will join Cedars-Sinai on August 27, 2018, succeeds Mark Gavens, who announced his retirement last year.

Jeff’s extensive leadership experience in academic medical center management, along with his clinical experience as a physician, will be crucial to Cedars-Sinai’s success in the years ahead. He is highly regarded for his innovation, collegiality and deep understanding of healthcare operations in both academic and community settings.

He is currently executive vice president and chief operating officer at UMass Memorial Medical Center, the 781-bed flagship academic medical center for the UMass Memorial Health System, which is the clinical partner of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. In that role, Jeff has been the institution’s senior operational leader, responsible for all clinical and support services. He also led initiatives to improve clinical quality, efficiency, patient flow and patient experience, and oversaw a $200 million campus-renovation project.

Prior to that, he served in leadership positions for ten years at Aurora Health Care, a 15-hospital health system in Wisconsin. His system roles included serving as executive vice president and interim chief clinical officer, where he was responsible for the Aurora Research Institute, medical education, patient safety and clinical informatics.

Jeff received his medical degree from the University of Miami and was chief medical resident at University of North Carolina Hospital and Clinics. He practiced internal medicine from 1999 to 2007 as a clinical associate professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. He also earned a juris doctor degree from the Marquette University Law School and a master’s degree in medical management from Carnegie Mellon University. Jeff also attained his Lean Black Belt Certification.

Please join me in welcoming Jeff, his wife, Karen, and their boys, Andrew (18), Benjamin (16), Marquette (14) and Gavin (11) to the Cedars-Sinai family.

New Jewish Advance Healthcare Directive Unveiled

Rabbi Jason Weiner

Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department, oversaw the drafting of an Advance Healthcare Directive tailored to the specific needs and traditions of the region's diverse Jewish community. The Cedars-Sinai Jewish Advance Healthcare Directive is the first of what he expects will be others created here that reflect the needs of other faith traditions. Here, he discusses why this effort is so important.

The first Jewish advance healthcare directive made its appearance in Genesis, when Jacob, nearing the end of his life, implored Joseph to bury him with his forefathers.

The way we care for those who are seriously ill has advanced since Jacob spoke with Joseph about 4,000 years ago. Our practices have changed a great deal as well in the decades since contemporary Jewish advance healthcare directives were first drafted in the early 1990s. These modern efforts, building on the foundations of our biblical ancestors, underscore how the need remains more crucial than ever.

Because of this need, my colleagues and I here at Cedars-Sinai have developed an innovative new healthcare advance directive, as well as a specifically Jewish version of the document we hope will be embraced by our Jewish patients and by diverse Jewish communities around the world.

To understand the nuances of this new advance directive, it is helpful to appreciate why a document like this is so essential.

Medical technology grows more sophisticated with each day, and with that comes the ability to intervene, cure disease, mend bodies and prolong life. Advance directives allow our patients to convey to their families and healthcare providers how they feel about their medical care if they are unable to actively participate in decisionmaking.

So why a Jewish version of the advance healthcare directive? The more the document can be formulated in a culturally and religiously sensitive manner, the better chance it has of actually being utilized and of accurately expressing patients’ goals, values and preferences.

There have been previous advance healthcare directives that catered to the Jewish community, including two by Orthodox organizations and one written by conservative rabbis. These documents have value, but our new advance healthcare directive takes an entirely different approach.

We cater to a diverse community, and our aim has been to craft language in a way that is sensitive to the religious views of the patient. And because the Cedars-Sinai version gives patients an opportunity to describe their values, it tells us about who our patients are, what is important to them and what is not important to them, not just which interventions they do or do not desire.

The Cedars-Sinai Jewish Advance Healthcare Directive provides a range of options. For example, individuals can appoint their own rabbi or a Jewish institution to assist with decisionmaking; patients also can indicate whether they want to donate their organs. The document is drawn up in a manner that is acceptable by the strictest interpretations of Jewish law, while at the same time not obligating patients to follow Jewish law if that is not their wish.

My hope is that the user-friendly healthcare advance directive will resonate with any Jewish patient who needs it, regardless of affiliation or persuasion.

This work is the start to a larger undertaking. Because Cedars-Sinai serves a broad and diverse community, it is our goal to produce more culturally sensitive and religiously appropriate directives for other groups so that all patients can express their values as they work through some of the most profound decisions in their lives.

Advancing Treatments for GI, Metabolic Issues

 

Mark Pimentel, MD

Cedars-Sinai has launched an initiative to accelerate the development of novel drugs, devices and therapies aimed at improving treatments for patients with gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases.

Physician-scientists and others in the Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program are focusing their research expertise on disorders of the microbiome.

This naturally occurring ecosystem of single-cell organisms—including bacteria, fungi, viruses and archaea—lives within the human gut.

The microbiome can protect against external infections and aid in digestion, but also can disrupt healthy gastrointestinal function, resulting in the development of diarrhea, constipation and other ailments.

MAST investigators are initially focusing on areas of the microbiome linked to irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, a condition in which excessive bacteria causes chronic diarrhea and related illnesses. Emerging technologies combined with identified patient needs will allow for expansion into new areas of research, such as metabolic disorders, diabetes and obesity.

Ruchi Mathur, MD

The initiative is the result of a partnership between the Cedars-Sinai Technology Transfer Office and the Burns & Allen Research Institute. With support from the partnership, investigators in the MAST Program tap into science, bioinformatics and other disciplines to develop new technologies and clinical treatments for common conditions affecting millions of people, driven by input from patients themselves.

"Discoveries best happen at the bedside of patients by doctors who are invested in their care," said Mark Pimentel, MD, executive director of the program and an associate professor of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai. "We have found that many of our discoveries have benefited a vast number of patients here and around the world. We expect that, with the formation of the MAST program, we will be able to help millions more with our growing pipeline of novel diagnostics and therapeutics."

MAST investigators have developed a breath test to identify the presence of hydrogen sulfide among the gases present in patients who experience diarrhea. Based on that work, the program has developed and applied for patents for a four-gas breath test device that should be available to patients by the end of the year.

The MAST team also has developed a system called Lotus to safely, quickly and precisely collect samples from patients' small intestines. Cedars-Sinai has licensed the technology to Hobbs Medical Inc., a Stafford Springs, Connecticut, manufacturer and supplier of endoscopy accessories. Pimentel and Cedars-Sinai have a financial interest in the Lotus system.

Along with scientific expertise, the team brings a track record of successfully navigating the lengthy and complex FDA-approval process.

"Through MAST, we are accelerating the development of innovations that will lead to faster diagnostics and treatments for patients," said Ruchi Mathur, MD, MAST's director of clinical research and an associate professor of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai. "Our team is dedicated to improving the lives of patients who are affected by gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases."

Donna Dooley-Aiello, RN, Receives Nursing Honor

Donna Dooley-Aiello, RN

Donna Dooley-Aiello, RN, a clinical nurse in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion operating room, is this year’s winner of the Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award.

The annual award recognizes a Cedars-Sinai nurse who represents clinical excellence, quality care and professionalism. Dooley-Aiello received the honor during the 36th Annual Nursing Award Ceremony, which was held last month in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

"Winning this award was a wonderful surprise and an honor, especially since my nomination came from physicians I have enjoyed working with over the years," she said. "I work with amazing anesthesiologists, OR staff and surgeons, and together we take great care of our patients."

Dooley-Aiello, whose career spans more than 30 years, believes the keys to exceptional nursing are thinking critically, observing keenly and practicing skillfully—while embracing compassion and respect.

"Be a participator, engage in learning new things and don’t ever be afraid to ask a question," she advised new nursing graduates. "Start and end your day with a smile."

Dooley-Aiello’s win was based on nominations by Cedars-Sinai physicians and a final decision by a seven-member selection panel.

"In my 40 years as a surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, I have worked with several nurses who exemplify the best of the nursing profession. Certainly, Ms. Dooley-Aiello is one of those nurses," said Leo A. Gordon, MD, in support of the nomination. "Her commitment to the profession, her dedication to a valuable work ethic and her ability to relate to all members of the healthcare team make her an example of all that is good about nursing and our hospital."

Circle of Friends Honorees for June

The Circle of Friends program honored 161 people in June.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Rachel Abuav, MD

Kenneth W. Adashek, MD, FACS

Daniel C. Allison, MD, MBA, FACS

Diannah M. Alvarez

Farin Amersi, MD

Ronald M. Andiman, MD

John B. Andrews, MD

Arash Asher, MD

David A. Austin, MD

Walid S. Ayoub, MD

Esther Baik, MD

Philip G. Brooks, MD

Neil A. Buchbinder, MD, FACC

Ashley M. Butkiewicz

Jeffrey F. Caren, MD, FACC

Brendan J. Carroll, MD

Ilana Cass, MD

Dru A. Cavanagh*

Michael L. Chaikin, MD, FACC

David H. Chang, MD

Kirk Y. Chang, MD

Stephen R. Corday, MD

Scott A. Cunneen, MD

Lawrence S. Czer, MD

Catherine M. Dang, MD, FACS

Laura O. Daniels, RN, BC, BSN

Mark M. Davidson, MD

Malgorzata E. de Riera

Gerry I. Delacruz

Alice R. Dick, MD

J. Kevin Drury, MD, FRCPC, FACC

Maria Katrina L. Ebron

Gregory P. Eichelzer

Yaron Elad, MD

Pedram Enayati, MD

Fardad Esmailian, MD

Richard Essner, MD, FACS

Jeremy A. Falk, MD

Randy Feldman, MD

Cindy L. Ferguson

Carrie E. Fishman, RN, MN

Brian L. Flyer, MD

Charles A. Forscher, MD

Stuart Friedman, MD

Larry Froch, MD

Srinivas Gaddam, MD

Eli S. Gang, MD

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Richard N. Gold, MD

Neil J. Goldberg, MD

Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP

Nestor Gonzalez, MD

Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD, FACP, FACC

Mark P. Goodman, MD

Martin N. Gordon, MD

Lloyd B. Greig, MD

Robert A. Gross, MD

Pavani S. Guntur, MD

Antoine Hage, MD

David S. Hallegua, MD, FACR

Omid Hamid, MD

Michele A. Hamilton, MD

Renee Herman, MD

David M. Hoffman, MD

Richard S. Horowitz, MD, FACP

Shao-Jung A. Hu, CNIII

Leonel Jimenez, RN, BC, BSN

Kendra S. Jones

Stanley C. Jordan, MD

David Y. Josephson, MD

Kamran Kalpari, MD

Saibal Kar, MD

Sousan Karimi, MD

David Kawashiri, MD

Elizabeth M. Kim, MD

Hyung L. Kim, MD

Jason B. Kirk, MD

Hera Kissoyan

Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Debra L. Kleinzweig, RN, BSN, OCN

Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD

Celia Kong

Ruth Krivis

Gary Leach, MD

Norman E. Lepor, MD, FACC, FAHA, FSCAI

Andrew J. Li, MD

Yuliya Linhares, MD

Sandy J. Liu

Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP

Joseph Loewy, MD

Victoria C. Lopez, RN

Phi N. Ma, RN

Cheryle C. Maano Requejo, RN, BSN, OCN

Susan MacGregor Huser

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Philomena McAndrew, MD

Kiarash Michel, MD

Stewart Middler, MD, PhD

Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc

Charles N. Moon, MD

Lori Ann Mountain, RN

Christopher S. Ng, MD

Helen Ngo

Nicholas N. Nissen, MD

Jillian R. Oft, MD

Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD

Ronald L. Paquette, MD

Dorothy J. Park, MD

Jigarkumar P. Patel

Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD

Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS

Mark Pimentel, MD, FRCP(C)

Edwin M. Posadas, MD

Alexandre Rasouli, MD

Chrystal M. Reed, MD, PhD

Bobbie J. Rimel

Sepehr Rokhsar, MD

Robert M. Rose, MD

Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD

Amy S. Rutman, MD

Colleen Ryan, MD

Jorge H. Salinas

Kevin S. Scher, MD, MBA

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Melanie C. Seo

Prediman K. Shah, MD

Edward J. Share, MD

Kaveh Sharif, MD

Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, FAAN

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS

Siddharth Singh, MD

Estelina Smith

Elizabeth M. Sobel

Thomas P. Sokol, MD, FASCRS

Andrew I. Spitzer, MD

Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS

Colin W. Stokol, MD

Leslie M. Stricke, MD, FCCP

Clive N. Svendsen, PhD

Steven W. Tabak, MD

Michele Tagliati, MD, FAAN

Victor F. Tapson, MD, FCCP, FRCP

Sophia A. Telfer

David B. Thordarson, MD

Hilda A. Torres

Heidi A. Tucker

Richard Tuli, MD, PhD

Marina Vaysburd, MD

Ronald G. Victor, MD

Andrew S. Wachtel, MD, FCCP

Christine S. Walsh, MD

Aaron S. Weinberg, MD

Jonathan M. Weiner, MD

America White, RN

Edward M. Wolin, MD

Keith Yabumoto, MD

Philip A. Yalowitz, MD

Clement C. Yang, MD

Michael C. Yang, MD

Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC

New Drug Treatments for Major Depression Emerging

A powerful anesthetic called ketamine is spawning a new generation of drug treatments for depression that has shown the ability to provide fast-acting relief, according to Waguih William IsHak, MD, FAPA, professor of Psychiatry and vice chair of Education and Research at Cedars-Sinai, who recently spoke to Heathline about the benefits and risks of these drugs.

After more than a decade without much innovation, IsHak explained, two major pharmaceutical companies are developing these new kinds of antidepressants. One medication is a nasal spray modeled after ketamine’s chemical structure; the other drug is chemically different, but mimics ketamine’s effect on the brain.

Approved by the FDA in 1970 as a pain treatment, ketamine was first used by U.S. soldiers during the Vietnam War. The drug has garnered recent interest because, unlike traditional antidepressants, ketamine sometimes can improve a patient’s mood within minutes.

But there are risks. Noting ketamine’s reputation as a tranquilizing club drug, IsHak pointed out both the drug’s need to be administered, usually intravenously, under supervision, and its side effect of dissociative symptoms.

Oral ketamine prescribed for pain has also caused concern, IsHak added.

"People take it to get high to get those dissociative feelings and hallucinations if they take higher doses," IsHak told Healthline. "So, I think that’s definitely a serious concern."

IsHak suggested finding a way to make oral administration safer so people can take the drug on their own rather than under supervision. He said that if changes like this could be made, ketamine-type medications could become an effective treatment.

"If this is oral with rapid onset of action," IsHak explained, "I can tell you this is something I’d prescribe as a first line and not wait until we exhaust two or three trials of other medicines."

This year, the Cedars-Sinai Inpatient Pain Management team led by Charles Louy, MD, presented their findings on the use of ketamine in pain and depression, jointly with the psychiatry team led by IsHak, at the American Psychiatric Association’s annual meeting, which was held in New York City in May 2018.

Harold, MD, Honored by Royal College of Physicians

John Gordon Harold, MD

John Gordon Harold, MD, attending physician at the Smidt Heart Institute and former president of the American College of Cardiology, has received an honorary fellowship from the Royal College of Physicians.

The honor recognizes Harold’s significant contributions to the medical profession, which include extensive work addressing the cardiovascular impacts of noncommunicable diseases. The admission ceremony was held July 4 at the Royal College of Physicians’ headquarters in Regents Park, London.

"This accolade is held by some of the most exceptional and innovative physicians in the world, and I am honored to join this fraternity. It represents one of the highlights of my career," Harold said. "The college continues to drive improvements in health and healthcare through advocacy, education and research across the world."

The Royal College of Physicians, originally chartered by King Henry VIII in 1518, represents 34,000 doctors worldwide and celebrates its 500th anniversary this September.

Annual Sand N’ Snore Set for Sept. 7

Campfires on the beach are part of the annual Sand 'N' Snore.

Sand N' Snore is just around the corner.

The dinner, sleepover and breakfast are slated to begin Friday, Sept. 7, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. (The club has restrooms and hot showers.) Those who don't want to sleep on the sand are welcome to enjoy dinner and the evening with colleagues and their families. Food and entertainment are provided, but physicians must bring their own tent and equipment.

Tickets for the whole event are $65 per adult and $45 for each child age 3-11. Tickets for Friday's dinner only are $50 per adult and $25 for each child 3-11.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

Product information updates for June from Pharmacy and Therapeutics are summarized in the PDF link below.

P and T Approvals - June 2018 (PDF)  

CS-Link Tip: Creating a Personal Preference List

It’s a busy day. You have to put in an order for a serum porcelain level. You type in the order and CS-Link™ returns a number of items, but not what you need. You try a different name. You try more letters. You try fewer letters. Finally, you get what you want.

The next time you want to order serum porcelain, you'll probably have the same problem—unless you learn how to create a personal preference list. A personal preference list lets users customize and categorize commonly used orders.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.