Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF June 29, 2018 | Archived Issues

Letter From Chief of Staff: New Opioid Protocol

Due to a critical nationwide shortage of injectable opioids, Cedars-Sinai will implement the following protocol immediately: Pharmacists will automatically substitute PRN orders for IV Dilaudid and IV morphine with PO oxycodone, if a patient tolerates oral medications.

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Update on EOLOA

Last month, we notified you that California’s End of Life Option Act (EOLOA) was deemed invalid by a California court and, as a result, Cedars-Sinai halted its participation in the EOLOA. Since then, an appellate court reinstated the EOLOA, and the law is currently valid and in effect.

» Read more

K-9s Join ED Security Team in Pilot Program

Cedars-Sinai is introducing two security service dogs to the Emergency Department in an ongoing effort to enhance security and safety for patients, visitors, volunteers and staff. Cali and Coco are female Belgian Malinois, a breed of sheepdog known for being active, sociable and hard-working. They will join the Security team in July as part of a pilot program.

» Read more

Ronald G. Victor, MD, Collects PRISM Award

Ronald G. Victor, MD, associate director of the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai, is the winner of the 2018 Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine. Victor received the honor for his work on a pioneering study on the management of hypertension. The annual award recognizes a Cedars-Sinai faculty member who has made a significant discovery or provided a critical insight within the last five years.

» Read more

Basil Rapoport, MD, Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Basil Rapoport, MD, endocrinologist and co-director of the Thyroid Autoimmunity Lab, is the recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award. The award was presented during the June 13 commencement of the Graduate Programs in Biomedical and Translational Sciences.

» Read more

Michael Lill, MD: 1959-2018

Michael Lill, who served as director of the Cedars-Sinai Blood and Marrow Transplant Program for more than 20 years and is referred to by colleagues as a “born teacher,” died June 19 of appendix cancer. He was 58. Lill was beloved by many across Cedars-Sinai who recalled his generous spirit and deep sense of commitment to his patients.

» Read more

Cardiologist Turns Promotional Pens Into Art

Jeffrey Caren, MD, a cardiologist at Cedars-Sinai, has amassed a vast and unrivaled collection of branded pharmaceutical company pens. Patients who visit his West Tower office can marvel at the display of hundreds of the promotional writing gifts, which tout everything from Viagra to Lexapro.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 196 people in May. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Core Labs Launching New Method For ESR

The Core Laboratories in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is launching a new method for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) with ALCOR iSED® instrumentation, which allows for rapid, automated analysis of ESR using lavender top tubes. The iSED rapid methodology will replace ESR measurement on Excyte® 40 analyzers beginning Monday, Aug. 6.

» Read more

Beth Karlan, MD, Named Fellow of ASCO

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has named Beth Karlan, MD, director of the Women’s Cancer Program in the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, a fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, or FASCO. The honor was awarded to Karlan in recognition of her dedication to volunteer efforts that benefit ASCO, the specialty of oncology and the patients ASCO serves. 

» Read more

Summer Is Here, and So Are Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and special musical guest, The Go-Go’s. The event on Tuesday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $140 per adult and $70 per child, 3-11 years of age.

» Read more

Annual Sand N’ Snore Set for Sept. 7

Sand N' Snore is just around the corner. The dinner, sleepover and breakfast are slated to begin Friday, Sept. 7, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip:Integration of Outside Records

Outside records are now integrated on the encounter tab in Chart Review in CS-Link™ through Care Everywhere. Tips are included to help you find a patient’s Care Everywhere information.

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: New Opioid Protocol

Due to a critical nationwide shortage of injectable opioids, Cedars-Sinai will implement the following protocol immediately: Pharmacists will automatically substitute PRN orders for IV Dilaudid and IV morphine with PO oxycodone, if a patient tolerates oral medications.

In addition, we need your cooperation to adhere to the following best practices:

  • Order oral opioids (and benzodiazepines) as soon as patients can tolerate them (please see PDF conversion table for reference)
  • Consider multimodal analgesia (e.g., oral acetaminophen, celecoxib, meloxicam, ketorolac), and/or topical products such as lidocaine patch and capsaicin
  • As always, the pain management service is available for consultation and support

We are actively trying to obtain additional IV opioids from manufacturers and distributors, and working through our legislative channels.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact: 

Rita Shane, PharmD, at Rita.Shane@cshs.org or at 310-423-5611, or Hai Tran, PharmD, at Hai.Tran@cshs.org or at 310-423-5630.

Clement C. Yang, MD
Chief of Staff

Opioid Conversion Table (PDF)  

Letter From Chief of Staff: Update on EOLOA

Dear Medical Staff,

Last month, we notified you that California’s End of Life Option Act (EOLOA) was deemed invalid by a California court and, as a result, Cedars-Sinai halted its participation in the EOLOA. Since then, an appellate court reinstated the EOLOA, and the law is currently valid and in effect.

Cedars-Sinai has resumed providing care under the EOLOA and existing policies. As always, you can contact the Center for Healthcare Ethics at 310-423-9636 if you have any questions about patients seeking end-of-life care.

Clement C. Yang, MD
Chief of Staff

K-9s Join ED Security Team in Pilot Program

K-9s Coco (left) and Cali sit with their respective handlers, Ray Soto and Gina Luttenegger.

Cedars-Sinai is introducing two security service dogs, Cali and Coco, to the Emergency Department in an ongoing effort to enhance security and safety for patients, visitors, volunteers and staff. The two dogs are female Belgian Malinois, a breed of sheepdog known for being active, sociable and hard-working.

Cali and Coco will join the Security team in July as part of a pilot program, serving under the supervision of professional handlers, former police officers and canine experts Ray Soto and Gina Luttenegger. The dogs will work in alternating shifts, seven days a week, from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. They will patrol the Emergency Department’s entrance and lobby as well as campus parking structures. (Soto and Luttenegger will be dressed in Polo shirts identifiable by Solutions Group International logos on the shoulders.)

The dogs will not enter patient rooms or other sensitive clinical areas. This makes them distinct from the Barbara Cowen POOCH Volunteer Program, whose dogs visit patients. Staff, patients and visitors should refrain from petting the security dogs.

“Cali and Coco were carefully selected to serve our medical center based on their obedience, work ethic and sociability,” said Bryan Croft, senior vice president for Operations. “The health, safety and comfort of our patients remain our top priorities. These dogs are highly trained and intelligent animals, and their arrival is part of our continued commitment to enhancing our robust security presence.”

Cedars-Sinai is the latest health system to use service dogs as part of security, joining The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Phoenix-based Banner Health, among others. Johns Hopkins launched its canine program with one dog in December 2016, expanding it to two by February 2017. Banner Health introduced its long-standing canine program in 1992 and has since expanded to more than 40 canine-handler teams across its Arizona and Colorado locations.

To prepare for their new jobs, Cali, Coco and their handlers underwent 40 hours of specialized training at Adlerhorst International, a service dog training facility in Riverside.

To assist in maintaining a safe environment for everyone on campus, all staff are encouraged to remain alert and to report any security concerns to the Security Department at 310-423-5511.

Ronald G. Victor, MD, Collects PRISM Award

Ronald G. Victor, MD

Ronald G. Victor, MD, associate director of the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai, is the winner of the 2018 Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine (PRISM). The annual award recognizes a Cedars-Sinai faculty member who has made a significant discovery or provided a critical insight within the last five years.

Victor received the honor for his work on a pioneering study on the management of hypertension. In the study, African-American men, who are disproportionately impacted by the treatable condition, received pharmacist-directed drug therapy to lower their blood pressure while visiting their barbers.

“This award is especially meaningful to me because it took me more than 20 years of research to create an effective barbershop model of hypertension care for black men,” Victor said.

The trial, which was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and received national press attention, included 319 men recruited from barbershops around the Los Angeles area. Two-thirds of participants who worked alongside a pharmacist in their barbershop lowered their blood pressure to new U.S. blood pressure targets.

“Having completed a markedly positive randomized controlled trial involving 52 Los Angeles neighborhood barbershops, we now have the scientific evidence we need to pursue research on program implementation and to transform hypertension care at the local, state and national levels,” Victor continued.

The award, which is based on faculty nominations and a decision by a panel of three judges, was presented by Eduardo Marban, MD, PhD, director of the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai, during the June 13 commencement of the Graduate Programs in Biomedical and Translational Sciences.

“He has done something that very few people have actually tried to do,” said Marban. “What Ron did as a basis for the nomination for the PRISM prize was something dazzlingly audacious.”

The PRISM award, which includes a monetary prize and a commemorative medal, was first presented in 2015. Previous recipients are Ueli Rutishauser, PhD; Robert H. Baloh, MD, PhD; and Stanley C. Jordan, MD.

Basil Rapoport, MD, Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Basil Rapoport, MD

Basil Rapoport, MD, endocrinologist and co-director of the Thyroid Autoimmunity Lab, is the recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

The award was presented by Paul Noble, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Medicine and director of the Women's Guild Lung Institute, during the June 13 commencement of the Graduate Programs in Biomedical and Translational Sciences.

"This recognition is richly deserved," Noble said to the audience in Harvey Morse Auditorium. "The Rapoport legacy is one of seminal contributions to thyroid pathophysiology. Over the course of 40 years, he has harnessed the power of molecular biology to expand the diagnonis and treatment of thyroid disease."

Rapoport, who received his medical degree from the University of Edinburgh, has made significant contributions in the field of thyroid pathophysiology throughout his 40-year career, including while working for the Cedars-Sinai departments of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

"I am grateful for the support I have received from Cedars-Sinai for 20 years, as well as for contributions by all the people that worked with us over many years," said Rapoport, extending special thanks to his scientific and life partner Sandra McLachlan, PhD.

During the ceremony, Noble detailed the wide influence of Rapoport’s research, which contributed to a deeper understanding of thyroid diseases, including Graves’ disease, hyperthyroidism and thyroid carcinoma.

"Given that roughly 12 percent of Americans suffer from some form of thyroid disease—200 million people worldwide—we know an enormous number of people are living longer and more productive, satisfying lives as a direct result of Dr. Rapoport’s insights and innovations," Noble said.

The Lifetime Achievement Award is the latest in a number of awards Rapoport has received throughout his career. Others include the Stanbury Pathophysiology Award and Gold Medal, the NIH Research Career Development Award and the Sidney H. Ingbar Distinguished Lectureship Award.

Rapoport continues to work and currently serves as a member of Thyroid’s editorial board.

Michael Lill, MD: 1959-2018

Michael Lill, MD

The patient was worried. Diagnosed with two life-threatening blood disorders, he faced a steep learning curve about his illnesses and had to make head-spinning treatment decisions, including whether to undergo a bone marrow transplant.

Luck, he said, was on his side when Michael Lill, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, took over his case in 2014.

"Dr. Lill saved my life, period," said the patient, Kevin McDevitt, 35. "He cured me."

Not only was Lill a "brilliant physician," McDevitt said, "he also was a great human being who guided me through the whole process, until I understood every aspect of my illnesses."

Lill, who served as medical director of the transplant program for more than 20 years and is referred to by colleagues as a "born teacher," died June 19 of appendix cancer. He was 58. Lill was beloved by many across Cedars-Sinai who recalled his generous spirit and his deep sense of commitment to his patients.

"Dr. Lill was an enormously compassionate physician and devoted advocate for patients who are facing the most difficult decisions," said Robert A. Figlin, MD, director of the Division of Hematology Oncology and deputy director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. "Michael’s humanity is reflected in how he tended to all of the needs of patients and their families throughout their cancer journey."

Establishing the Transplant Program

Lill, an Australia native, joined the Cedars-Sinai faculty in September 1997 and established the transplant program. He initially wore a number of hats, including program director, attending physician and administrator, said Patricia Van Strien, RN, the department’s longtime clinical program coordinator. Today, the Cedars-Sinai program is one of the largest in the Los Angeles area. Its staff members have completed nearly 2,200 stem cell and bone marrow transplant procedures and perform about 120 transplants a year.

In addition to building a multidisciplinary team that includes physicians, nurses, transplant coordinators, pharmacists, dietitians, psychologists, social workers, and occupational and physical therapists, Lill brought the allogeneic transplant procedure to Cedars-Sinai, one of his greatest achievements, said Steven Lim, MD, Lill’s longtime colleague. In that procedure—utilized when a patient’s own blood cells are too diseased to use as replacement cells—relatives or strangers serve as stem cell donors.

The bloodless bone marrow transplant program at Cedars-Sinai—initiated by Lill in 1997 after getting his first referral of a Jehovah’s Witness leukemia patient—was another major achievement, colleagues said. Witnesses do not accept blood transfusions—the standard of care for transplantation—for religious reasons. The program is one of the few in the country that offers the "bloodless" procedure to Witnesses with lymphoma, multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. Witnesses from around the world have sought Lill’s expertise and 75 have undergone stem cell transplants at the medical center.

"I'm a strong believer in patient autonomy," Lill explained in a 2008 Los Angeles Times interview. “These patients wouldn't otherwise be helped. The world is full of people who hold completely different beliefs than yours. You can still respect and treat them."

Celebration of Life Luncheon

And celebrate them. In 1998, Lill launched the first Cedars-Sinai Celebration of Life luncheon—an annual event honoring blood and bone marrow transplant survivors and their families, who gather for shared stories and heartfelt reunions with physicians, nurses and other team members involved in their care. Over the years, he also hosted staff retreats and parties at his San Fernando Valley home.

"He loved life," Lim said. "He surrounded himself with an incredible number of friends and colleagues, with whom he talked about history, science, poetry and philosophy." An avid martial arts enthusiast, Lill also practiced Jeet Kune Do, Brazilian jiujitsu and kickboxing. He earned two black belts and a brown belt, and he ran in three marathons.

Appendix Cancer in 2007

Lill was diagnosed with appendix cancer in late 2007. His disease went into remission after surgery and six months of chemotherapy. It recurred in 2016. True to form, his own cancer journey provided insights into the needs of his patients, adding an even deeper level of empathy, his colleagues said. Lill shared his experiences and feelings through a personal blog in his typically open and honest way, they said.

"I am focusing on trying to enjoy myself as much as possible for as long as possible and to make as many memories as possible, even if the beneficiary of those memories is not going to be me," he wrote in a Jan. 23, 2017, entry.

Born in Australia

Lill was born on Aug. 3, 1959, in Adelaide, Australia. He earned his medical degree and completed his residencies in Australia before joining the bone marrow transplant program at UCLA in 1989. He joined Cedars-Sinai in 1997. In addition to a keen devotion to his practice, he served on multiple committees at the medical center and on national boards. He also was a committed teacher who encouraged his staff members to seek higher degrees and helped them attain them.

"He was a shooting star," said Van Strien, who is among those he encouraged. "I feel honored that our paths crossed."

Lill is survived by his wife, Gay Crooks, MD, a UCLA stem cell researcher and pediatric bone marrow transplant specialist, whom he met while the two studied medicine in Perth, Australia. Lill also is survived by their two children, Georgia Lill, a UCLA medical student, and Alexander Lill, a filmmaker.

Donations in memory of Michael Lill, MD, may be directed to the Blood & Marrow Transplant Program at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. Visit the Giving program website, or make checks payable to Cedars-Sinai, with “In memory of Michael Lill, MD” in the memo line. Mail them to Robert Figlin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Institute, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Room 2416, Los Angeles, CA 90048.

Cardiologist Turns Promotional Pens Into Art

Jeffrey Caren, MD, shows off a small portion of his massive collection of branded pharmaceutical company pens. 

The pen is said to be mightier than the sword. That may be, but pens are certainly easier to collect and display.

Jeffrey Caren, MD, a cardiologist at Cedars-Sinai, knows all about that. Over a six-year period, he amassed a vast and unrivaled collection of branded pharmaceutical company pens. Patients who visit his West Tower office can marvel at the display of hundreds of the one-time promotional writing gifts, which tout everything from Viagra to Lexapro.

Over the years, Caren’s unusual collection has garnered national attention from major media outlets including The New York Times and ABC World News Tonight. Last summer, a portion of the collection was shipped to Oakland where it was showcased in a temporary exhibit at the Museum of Capitalism. An estimated 10,000 visitors beheld the mighty pen spectacle.

"We chose Dr. Caren’s pens because they help tell the story of capitalism," said Timothy Furstnau, curator of the Museum of Capitalism.

Furstnau explained the pens represent a specific historical period and American cultural practice that demonstrate the “outsized” influence on human health and healthcare.

"They are a great example of an ordinary person living within capitalism having the foresight to collect something that many of us see every day, but don’t recognize the value of—which is how many of our collections are assembled," added Furstnau.

Accumulating a massive pile of pharmaceutical pens was hardly an endeavor Caren ever saw himself pursuing. True, he has enjoyed numerous hobbies including photography and model ship building, as well as assembling other collections of U.S. stamps, wine corks and police and firefighter coffee mugs.

But his pen collection grew out of the common practice more than a decade ago of pharmaceutical companies giving away free pens and other branded items to help encourage sales for their products. Caren noticed that each pen was dramatically different in design.

"I decided to make a little fun of the process," said Caren.

Caren soon made it clear to pharmaceutical representatives that he wouldn’t talk to them unless they brought in a pen first. The representatives complied so much so Caren soon had to modify that rule. Now, they had to bring in a pen Caren didn’t already have.

"They started scrambling," he said. "They knew they couldn’t come in here without a fresh pen."

In all, Caren estimates he took in more than 1,200 pens. The writing implements, he proudly notes, are all in mint condition.

"They’ve never been written with by human hands," he said. "At least, not in my custody."

Their pristine beauty is on permanent exhibit in his office. About 600 pens are in a transparent case affixed to an office pillar. He and his wife spent about $600 on the display and devoted a weekend to carefully gluing each pen inside the case.

Now, he can’t imagine his office without his pen pillar.

"It’s pretty ugly without the pens," he said. "This is what they call industrial art."

His pen collection would certainly be bigger today if the giveaways weren’t discontinued. In 2009, the pharmaceutical industry imposed a voluntary ban on distributing the branded items to physicians.

"I would have gone on collecting those pens forever," he said.

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

The Circle of Friends program honored 196 people in May.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Rachel Abuav, MD

Mary C. Adams, RN

Natasha Adamski

Kenneth W. Adashek, MD, FACS

Janice M. Aguilar, RN

Lynn B. Alper, RN

Farin Amersi, MD

John B. Andrews, MD

Laura G. Audell, MD, MS

Babak Azarbal, MD

Michel Babajanian, MD, FACS

Esther Baik, MD

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA

Ravneet Bajwa, MD

Mark Bamberger, MD

Moshe Barnajian, MD

Eli M. Baron, MD

Jillian R. Beekman, RN

George Berci, MD

Robert M. Bernstein, MD

Lisa Betesh

Glenn D. Braunstein, MD

Scott A. Braunstein, MD

Earl W. Brien, MD

Philip G. Brooks, MD

Eileen G. Brown, RN, OCN

Marshia G. Caceres, MSW, LCSW, ACM

Diana Campos

James L. Caplan, MD, FACP, FCCP

Jeffrey F. Caren, MD, FACC

Ilana Cass, MD

Michael L. Chaikin, MD, FACC

Kirk Y. Chang, MD

Patricia J. Chang, MD

George Chaux, MD, FCCP

Helen Chim, RN

Jae Chon, MD

William W. Chow, MD

Sumeet S. Chugh, MD

Alice P. Chung, MD, FACS

Arnold C. Cinman, MD

Martin Cooper, MD

Stephen T. Copen, MD

Stephen R. Corday, MD

David Cossman, MD

Alice C. Cruz, MD

Carlos A. Dardon Arriaga, CP

Teresa M. Dean, MD

Premal J. Desai, MD

Stephen C. Deutsch, MD, FACP

Nelma C. Diaz

Alice R. Dick, MD

J. Kevin Drury, MD, FRCPC, FACC

Ashkan Ehdaie, MD

Yaron Elad, MD

Tania F. Esakoff, MD

Shervin Eshaghian, MD

Richard Essner, MD, FACS

Sharmayne Farrior, BSN, RN, CPN

Edward J. Feldman, MD

Robert A. Figlin, MD, FACP

Kimberly Fong

Charles A. Forscher, MD

Michelle L. Friedman

David M. Frisch, MD

Ivor L. Geft, MD

Nima M. Gharavi, MD, PhD

Natalya Ginpilson

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Neil J. Goldberg, MD

Loida R. Gonzales, CP

Nestor Gonzalez, MD

Martin N. Gordon, MD

Richard E. Gould, MD

Leland M. Green, MD

Pavani S. Guntur, MD

Solomon I. Hamburg, MD, PhD

Michele A. Hamilton, MD

Arman Hekmati, MD

Andrew E. Hendifar, MD, MPH

Emmanuel E. Hernandez

Jethro L. Hu, MD

Abraham Ishaaya, MD

Marney Jakubowicz, LVN

J. Patrick Johnson, MD

Wilbur L. Jones

Jay L. Jordan, MD

Saibal Kar, MD

Sheila M. Kar, MD

Beth Y. Karlan, MD

Scott R. Karlan, MD

Rosa B. Kassaseya, CP

David Kawashiri, MD

Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH, FACC, FASE

Raj M. Khandwalla, MD

Chae Y. Kim

Hyung L. Kim, MD

Terrence T. Kim, MD

Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD

Lowell R. Korman, MD, MS

Benjamin Kretzmann, MD

Armida Leister, LVN

Andrew J. Li, MD

Barak Maguen, MD

Ali Mahtabifard, MD

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Karim Marouf, RN

Annalissa C. Marquez

Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)

Allison M. Mays, MD

Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS

Becky J. Miller, MD

Cyrus K. Mody, MD

Nancy Moldawer, RN, MSN

Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD, FACC

Hattie M. Munn

Reiad Najjar

Youram Nassir, MD

Alan C. Newman, DDS

Edward K. Nomoto, MD

Pedro P. Ortiz

Guy D. Paiement, MD, MBA, FRCSC

Justin Palarca

Dorothy J. Park, MD

Rajan M. Patel, MD

Chirag G. Patil, MD

Kathryn M. Perez, RN

Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD

Francesca M. Pimentel

Mark Pimentel, MD, FRCP(C)

Shervin Rabizadeh, MD, MBA

Soroush A. Ramin, MD

Alexandre Rasouli, MD

Chrystal M. Reed, MD, PhD

Robert M. Rose, MD

Sonja L. Rosen, MD

Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD

Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD

Soraya A. Ross, MD

Andrew Roth, MD

Jessica C. Roth, MD

Vivian L. Salle, RN

Bruce A. Samuels, MD, FACC

Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS

Caroline Sayegh, RN

Kevin S. Scher, MD, MBA

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Scott Serden, MD

Aamir S. Shah, MD, FACS

Halim Shariff

Stephanie N. Sharma

Omid A. Shaye, MD

Michael M. Shehata, MD

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS

Steven M. Simons, MD, FACP, FCCP

Jason C. Snibbe, MD

Ingrid Soares

Andrew I. Spitzer, MD

Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS

Colin W. Stokol, MD

Steven W. Tabak, MD

Michele Tagliati, MD, FAAN

Samantha L. Thomson, MD

David B. Thordarson, MD

Hannah Dyza M. Tortal

Joshua Trabulus, MD

Tina Tran, RN

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Diane M. Tryciecky

Allan W. Tulloch, MD

Mike A. Uyeki, MD

Robert A. Vescio, MD

Willis H. Wagner, MD, FACS

Frederick J. Walker, RN, BSN

Daniel J. Wallace, MD, FACP, FACR

Christine S. Walsh, MD

Xunzhang Wang, MD

Ariel E. Weber, RN, BSN, CCRN

Jonathan M. Weiner, MD

Jason E. Willetts, RN

Michelle Williams Evans, RN

Arthur Wu, MD

Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC

Raymond Zimmer, MD

Core Labs Launching New Method For ESR

The Core Laboratories in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine is launching a new method for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) with ALCOR iSED® instrumentation, which allows for rapid, automated analysis of ESR using lavender top tubes. The iSED rapid methodology will replace ESR measurement on Excyte® 40 analyzers beginning Monday, Aug. 6.

The average bias between the methods is ~0.4 mm/hr. Deming regression analysis shows a linear correlation with a slope of 0.997, y-intercept of 0.5 mm/hr, and a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9847 (the method correlation is shown in the figure below). Therefore, the two methods correlate very well to one another. iSED will replace Excyte methodology (current platform).

For ESR by iSED specimens should be collected in lavender top (13x75 mm) tubes and submitted for analysis immediately. Samples are stable at room temperature for four to six hours and at 4°C for 24 hours.

The new reference intervals are as follows:

  • Men under 50 y/o < 15 mm/hr
  • Men over 50 y/o < 20 mm/hr
  • Women under 50 y/o <20 mm/hr
  • Women over 50 y/o < 30 mm/hr

If you have questions, contact Kimia Sobhani, PhD, at kimia.sobhani@cshs.org.

Beth Karlan, MD, Named Fellow of ASCO

Beth Karlan, MD

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has named Beth Karlan, MD, director of the Women’s Cancer Program in the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, a fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, or FASCO.

The honor was awarded to Karlan in recognition of her dedication to volunteer efforts that benefit ASCO, the specialty of oncology and the patients ASCO serves. The distinction is reserved for ASCO’s most active volunteer members and encourages more members to become involved in volunteer activities.

“I am thrilled to be named a fellow of the American Society of Clinical Oncology,” said Karlan, professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, who received the honor during the organization’s annual meeting in Chicago on June 2. “As a gynecologic oncologist, the FASCO distinction is especially meaningful as I work tirelessly with the ASCO community to highlight the needs of women with cancer.”

ASCO members are eligible to become a fellow if they have accumulated 100 or more points for volunteer service to ASCO and its philanthropic affiliate, the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Eligibility is limited to active members of the society.

To learn more about the award designation, visit the ASCO website.

Summer Is Here, and So Are Fireworks

The Hollywood Bowl

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and special musical guest,  The Go-Go’s.

The event on Tuesday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $140 per adult and $70 per child, 3-11 years of age.

Parking passes also are available. Valet is $55, lower terrace is $23.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

Annual Sand N’ Snore Set for Sept. 7

Campfires on the beach are part of the annual Sand 'N' Snore.

Sand N' Snore is just around the corner.

The dinner, sleepover and breakfast are slated to begin Friday, Sept. 7, at the Jonathan Beach Club in Santa Monica. (The club has restrooms and hot showers.) Those who don't want to sleep on the sand are welcome to enjoy dinner and the evening with colleagues and their families. Food and entertainment are provided, but physicians must bring their own tent and equipment.

Tickets for the whole event are $65 per adult and $45 for each child age 3-11. Tickets for Friday's dinner only are $50 per adult and $25 for each child 3-11.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

CS-Link Tip:Integration of Outside Records

Outside records are now integrated on the encounter tab in Chart Review in CS-Link™ through Care Everywhere.

Here are tips to help you learn how to:

For more information, meet for coffee and conversation Wednesday, July 11, from 7-9 a.m. in the South Mezzanine parking lot.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.