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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF March 9, 2018 | Archived Issues

Program Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Pioneering Surgery

Cedars-Sinai's Heart Transplant Program celebrated the 50th anniversary of Christiaan Barnard's pioneering surgery—and its own 30th anniversary—at a packed event at Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

Prepare for LA Marathon Street Closures March 18

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 18, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai. Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by 2 p.m.

» Read more

Honor a Deserving Nurse

Online nominations for the 2018 Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award for eligible nurses are open through Friday, March 23. Only members of the medical staff may submit a nomination for this award, which recognizes nurses who exemplify professionalism, clinical excellence and caring.

» Read more

Study Looks at Undiagnosed Heart Attacks in Women

Women who complain about chest pain often are reassured by their doctors that there is no reason to worry because their angiograms show that the women don't have blockages in the major heart arteries, a primary cause of heart attacks in men. But a National Institutes of Health study, led by investigators at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center in the Smidt Heart Institute, shows that about 8 percent of those women have scars on their heart that indicate they experienced a heart attack.

» Read more

New Advertising Campaign for Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedics

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Cedars-Sinai has unveiled a new consumer advertising campaign for orthopaedic care, which is being featured throughout the greater Los Angeles area in a variety of mediums including television, radio, print and digital.

» Read more

Research Day: Crafting Cancer-Killing Drugs

It's not every day that you can spend your lunch hour learning about a historic breakthrough in cancer treatment from the physician-scientist who helped achieve it. That rare opportunity helped draw a capacity crowd to Harvey Morse Auditorium last month to hear Michel Sadelain, MD, PhD, deliver the keynote address at Research Day, an annual showcase of scientific achievements at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai, Emulate Advance Precision Medicine

EMU chip co

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai and Emulate Inc. are pioneering a Patient-on-a-Chip program to help predict which disease treatments would be most effective based on a patient's genetic makeup and disease variant—a new approach to precision medicine for improving patient care and health.

» Read more

Scientists Re-Create Living Gut Lining on Chip

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Investigators have demonstrated how cells of a human intestinal lining created outside an individual’s body mirror living tissue when placed inside microengineered Intestine-Chips, opening the door to personalized testing of drug treatments. The study's senior author is Robert Barrett, PhD.

» Read more

FDA Warns About Prescribing Clarithromycin to Heart Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising caution before prescribing the antibiotic clarithromycin (Biaxin) to patients with heart disease because of a potential increased risk of heart problems or death that can occur years later.

» Read more

CS-Link: Cleaning Up InBasket

To prevent clutter, avoid storing results in your InBasket even if you think you'll need to return to it later. Results will always be part of the patient's chart and can be easily retrieved by going to your InBasket at the botton left of your screen. Check under "completed work," and click. Folders of previous work will pop up.

» Read more

Program Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Pioneering Surgery

Fifty years ago, Christiaan Barnard, MD, performed the first heart transplant at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. Last week, two members of the team that assisted Barnard joined members of Cedars-Sinai's heart transplant team to celebrate the anniversary and the advances that have come in the intervening years.

Hosted by Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD, the DSL/Thomas D. Gordon Chair in Heart Transplantation Medicine, and Leon Fine, MD, professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine and director of the Program in the History of Medicine, the celebration drew a crowd of about 160 filled Harvey Morse Auditorium on Feb. 26.

Warwick Peacock, MD, a professor of surgery at UCLA, and Desmond Shapiro, MD, a nephrologist with St. Joseph Health in Santa Rosa, were junior members of Barnard's team at the groundbreaking surgery in December 1967. Peacock told the audience of his mentor's travels across the U. S. as he sought to learn about transplantation; Shapiro spoke of the challenges of practicing medicine in an environment with "First World skills and a Third World patient population."

The recipient of the first transplanted heart, Louis Washkansky, lived just 18 days after the operation, but subsequent patients survived far longer. The fifth, Peacock said, lived a dozen years after the surgery, the sixth lived another 23 years.

Alfredo Trento, MD, professor and director of the Division of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, performed the first heart transplant at Cedars-Sinai in 1988. The patient, a 65-year-old woman named Laurel Labash, asked Trento how much more time the operation would allow her. When Trento told her there was a good chance she would live another five years, Labash responded, "I'll make you a wager: I'll live another 20 years." She exceeded both their expectations, dying in 2011.

Since the trailblazing surgery on Labash, another 1,328 patients have had heart transplants at Cedars-Sinai.

"Heart transplantation has come a long way over these 50 years," said Kobashigawa. "We now have markedly improved survival and a return to an excellent quality of life. Cedars-Sinai has been the largest such program in the country over the past five years, performing more than 100 heart transplant surgeries annually. Our one-year survival rate of greater than 91 percent exceeds government expectations. This is truly a reflection of our gifted surgeons and outstanding care provided by the OR, hospital and clinic staffs."

Other speakers at the event included Lawrence Czer, MD, medical director of the Heart Transplant Program; Farad Esmailian, MD, surgical director of the Heart Transplant Program; and Kelly Perkins, a transplant recipient and co-founder of the Moving Hearts Foundation, which seeks to raise awareness around organ, tissue and blood donation issues.

Stressing the value of transplantation, Perkins, an avid climber and mountaineer who got her new heart in 1995, said, "I'm not what I used to be, but I am doing what I used to do."

Prepare for LA Marathon Street Closures March 18

The Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday, March 18, could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 18, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

Numerous street closures will begin at 4 a.m., including some freeway ramps. For much of the day, the only ways to cross the marathon route will be on the 405, 101 or 110 freeways.

Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by 2 p.m.

The course runs from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica, passing just north and west of Cedars-Sinai.

Streets and freeway ramps near the course will close from as early as 4 a.m. until the afternoon. The best access to the medical center for those coming from north of the marathon route will be from the 10 Freeway, exiting at Robertson or La Cienega boulevards.

The marathon's website includes an interactive map of street closures associated with the race.

For the latest traffic alerts and updates, tune into local news radio stations or check websites such as:

Honor a Deserving Nurse

Online nominations for the 2018 Maggie Stempson-Carter Excellence in Caring Award for eligible nurses are open through Friday, March 23.

Only members of the medical staff may submit a nomination for this award, which recognizes nurses who exemplify professionalism, clinical excellence and caring. Originally known as the Excellence in Caring Award, this annual recognition was renamed in 2005 in honor of the late Maggie Stempson-Carter, RN, who won the award in 2004.

Other award recipients include:

  • Jason Kirsnis, RN
  • Peachy Hain, RN
  • Jean Eskenazi, RN
  • Bernice Coleman, PhD, ACNP
  • Betty Nersesian, RN
  • Paula Anastasia, RN
  • Tess Constantino, RN
  • Naomi Tashman, RN
  • Monette De Leon, RN
  • Raji Gandhi, RN
  • Rema Pendon, RN
  • Grace Romulo, RN
  • Joan Kirschner, RN

Nominations can be submitted via the intranet or the internet.

The award recipient will be selected by the Excellence in Caring Award Medical Staff Selection Committee and will be announced at the annual Nursing Awards Ceremony on May 9.

If you submitted a nomination last year and would like your nominee to be considered again this year, email chris.ng@cshs.org.

Study Looks at Undiagnosed Heart Attacks in Women

Women who complain about chest pain often are reassured by their doctors that there is no reason to worry because their angiograms show that the women don't have blockages in the major heart arteries, a primary cause of heart attacks in men.

Janet Wei, MD

But a National Institutes of Health study, led by investigators at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center in the Smidt Heart Institute, shows that about 8 percent of those women have scars on their heart that indicate they experienced a heart attack. The findings were published last month in Circulation, the American Heart Association's peer-reviewed medical journal.

"This study proves that women need to be taken seriously when they complain of chest pain, even if they don't have the typical symptoms we see in men," said Janet Wei, MD, the first author of the study. "Too often, these women are told they don't have a heart problem, and they are sent home instead of receiving appropriate medical care."

The study is part of the ongoing Women's Ischemic Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study, a multiyear, multicenter research project. Sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the study began in 1997 and has brought to light gender-related differences in heart disease.

The study looked at women who had complained of chest pain and had no coronary artery blockages. Among the results:

  • Of the 340 women who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)—a detailed imaging scan of the heart, 26—or 8 percent, were found to have myocardial scar, indicating the women had experienced prior heart muscle damage.
  • Approximately one-third of those 26 women were never diagnosed with a heart attack, even though their cardiac scans indicated they had heart muscle damage.
  • Of the 179 women who underwent a one-year follow-up CMR, two women, or 1 percent, were found to have myocardial scars that weren't there the year before. Both women had interim hospitalizations for chest pain but were not diagnosed with heart attacks.

"Many women go to the hospital with chest pain but they often aren't tested for a heart attack because doctors felt they were low-risk," said C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center in the Smidt Heart Institute. "And they are considered low-risk because their heart disease symptoms are different than the symptoms men experience."

Bairey Merz, the primary investigator of the WISE study, is a pioneer in uncovering the differences between men and women with heart disease.

Men with heart disease are more likely to have major plaque build-up in the major arteries bringing blood to the heart. A heart attack occurs when plaque causes blood flow to decrease or stop.

The WISE study has revealed that women who don't have blockages in their major heart arteries but who experience chest pain might have microvascular dysfunction in the tiny vessels around the heart. That condition can go undetected because typical heart attack tests, such as an electrocardiogram, often don't detect microvascular dysfunction.

"We are finding that either these women are not being tested because doctors think they are at low risk or that the tests doctors are ordering are not picking up these small heart attacks," Wei said.

As a result of the study, Wei and Bairey Merz are collaborating with Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD, a renowned expert in the study of proteins, including troponin, a protein that appears in the blood after a heart attack.

"By developing highly sensitive tests to detect previously unknown biomarkers, we may pinpoint and even prevent cardiovascular disease in women," Van Eyk said.

New Advertising Campaign for Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedics

A new consumer advertising campaign has been unveiled, featuring television, radio, print, outdoor and digital creative seen throughout greater Los Angeles.

The campaign highlights both the depth and scope of sports medicine treatment at Cedars-Sinai, reinforcing the organization's leadership in the field and affirming its commitment to patients at all levels of physical activity—from elite athletes and fitness buffs to those who simply need expert care to recover from an injury. Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute is the team doctors for a variety of elite athletes and sports teams including the Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Clippers. The ads feature Justin Turner of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and highlights the Los Angeles Rams and active Angelenos participating in activities across the region.

"The campaign's key message-Come Back Better-affirms the mission of the Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute to provide the highest quality care," said Mark S. Vrahas, MD, founding chair of the Department of Orthopaedics. "Our aim is to have our patients attain and retain optimum performance, whether that's on the field or in their day-to-day lives."

The campaign, which launched Monday, runs through the beginning of June.

Here is a link to one of the video components of the campaign:

Research Day: Crafting Cancer-Killing Drugs

Michael Doche (left), PhD, project scientist in the Cedars-Sinai Biobank and Translational Research Core, explains his research on a new method of collecting prostate tissue to Joshua Saylor, research associate in the laboratory of Beatrice Knudsen, MD, PhD, medical director of the biobank.

It's not every day that you can spend your lunch hour learning about a historic breakthrough in cancer treatment from the physician-scientist who helped achieve it. That rare opportunity helped draw a capacity crowd to Harvey Morse Auditorium last month to hear Michel Sadelain, MD, PhD, deliver the keynote address at Research Day, an annual showcase of scientific achievements at Cedars-Sinai.

Sadelain, director of the Center for Cell Engineering and the Gene Transfer and Gene Expression Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, helped forge the future of immunotherapy—which harnesses the immune system to fight diseases—by proving that human cells can be transformed into cancer-killing drugs.

This milestone achievement was nearly 30 years in the making, Sadelain explained. It began in the 1990s, when as a postdoctoral student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he was intrigued by innovative genetic engineering tools designed to introduce genes into T cells—a type of immune-response cell—with the goal of creating cancer fighters.

In 2002, Sadelain and his research team demonstrated that T cells can be removed from a patient and then genetically engineered to produce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on the cells' surface. CARs are synthetic receptors that arm T cells with proteins capable of recognizing cancer. The genetically engineered T cells, when returned to the patient through infusion, not only kill tumor cells—they persist in the body as "living drugs." CAR T-cell therapy was born.

The next year, Sadelain's team published a seminal paper demonstrating that CAR T cells equipped with a protein known as CD19 could fight leukemia in a mouse model. "We then set out to translate our mouse-model success to the clinic," Sadelain said. They achieved their goal last year when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved CD19 CAR T-cell therapy for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in certain children and young adults and also for certain patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Most recently, in the Feb. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Sadelain and colleagues published results of a phase 1 clinical trial of 53 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who received CD19 CAR T-cell therapy. Complete remission was achieved in 83 percent of these patients.

While tremendous strides have been made in CAR T-cell therapy, Sadelain said challenges remain, including managing side effects and applying the approach to more types of cancer.

Looking ahead, Sadelain said: "My hope is that CD19 CAR T-cell therapy is just the tip of the iceberg. T cells aren't just for oncology. They could be used to reprogram regulatory cells, harnessed to fight infections or even pave the way for the other big giant-regenerative medicine."

Sadelain's presentation was followed by a poster session showcasing more than 130 Cedars-Sinai research projects covering an expansive range of topics, including how the brain stores memories and a novel strategy for early detection of prostate cancer.

Three prizes were awarded for the best posters:

  • First prize: Rebecca Meza, research associate III, from the laboratory of Edwin Posadas, MD, associate professor of Medicine and medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Center. Meza was a contributing author on a study showing that in some prostate cancer patients the secretion of a protein called Chitinase 3-like 1 can cause tumor cells to spread and further harm the patient.
  • Second prize: Shirley Cheng, research associate I, also from the Posadas laboratory. Cheng is part of a research team that identified a specific group of circulating tumor cells that can help flag prostate cancer patients who are likely to have a more aggressive cancer that responds poorly to treatment, resulting in shortened survival.
  • Third prize: Austin Yeon, research associate I, from the laboratory of Jayoung Kim, PhD, research scientist and associate professor of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences. Yeon contributed to a study demonstrating that resistance to the standard chemotherapy treatment for bladder cancer potentially can be overcome by adjusting the lipid metabolism of resistant bladder cancer cells.

Cedars-Sinai, Emulate Advance Precision Medicine

Microengineered Organ-Chip, made out of a flexible polymer, features tiny channels that can be lined with thousands of living human cells.

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai and Emulate Inc. are pioneering a Patient-on-a-Chip program to help predict which disease treatments would be most effective based on a patient's genetic makeup and disease variant—a new approach to precision medicine for improving patient care and health.

The collaboration leverages innovative stem cell science from the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute and Emulate's Human Emulation System, which uses Organs-on-Chips technology to re-create true-to-life biology outside the body.

This technology creates an environment where the cells exhibit an unprecedented level of biological function, and provides control of complex human biology and disease mechanisms not possible with existing techniques.

Initial scientific findings, recently published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, a journal of the American Gastroenterology Association, mark a milestone in the Patient-on-a-Chip program.

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai and Emulate demonstrated how cells of a human intestinal lining created outside an individual's body mirror living tissue when placed inside Emulate's Intestine-Chips, opening the door to personalized testing of drug treatments.

The research points to a host of practical clinical applications that can benefit patients. By placing a patient's cells in Organ-Chips and exposing those cells to a drug or series of drugs, clinicians could gain more accurate information about how that individual would respond to treatment, avoiding the risk of administering a drug that may cause harm or is ineffective and costly.

"The medical potential of a Patient-on-a-Chip is extraordinary," said Clive Svendsen, PhD, director of the Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute and professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine. "As examples, scientists could use Organs-on-Chips to create a living model of a patient with Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Crohn's syndrome, a debilitating inflammatory bowel disorder linked to several gene mutations. By flowing drugs through Organ-Chips containing the patient's own cells and tissue, we could predict which treatment is most beneficial for that patient."

Cedars-Sinai and Emulate each have contributed integral components to the Patient-on-a-Chip program.

Cedars-Sinai scientists can harvest cells from the blood or skin of an individual and reprogram them into induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be made into any organ cell (such as those from the lung, liver or intestine), each bearing the unique genetic fingerprint and characteristics of the person.

Emulate's Human Emulation System—made up of Organs-on-Chips, instrumentation and software apps—re-creates the natural physiology cells experience within the body. Each chip, which is approximately the size of an AA battery, features tiny channels lined with tens of thousands of living human cells, re-creating the smallest functional unit of an organ.

Air and fluid, such as blood, can be passed through the chips, creating a microengineered environment that is a "home-away-from-home" for cells, where they behave just as they do in the body.

"By creating a personalized Patient-on-a-Chip, we can really begin to understand how diseases, medicines, chemicals and foods affect an individual's health," said Geraldine A. Hamilton, PhD, president and chief scientific officer of Emulate. "The goal of Emulate working with Cedars-Sinai is to advance and qualify the system for new clinical applications and ultimately democratize the technology so that it can have broad impact on patient healthcare."

In the future, a Patient-on-a-Chip also could be used to predict how a disease progresses in an individual, allowing for the design of personalized regimens to promote wellness and prevent disease, said Robert Barrett, PhD, an assistant professor of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai and senior author of the study in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Other applications include designing clinical trials to identify at-risk populations for adverse drug reactions.

"Cedars-Sinai's world-class stem cell expertise and discovery, combined with Emulate's pioneering Human Emulation System, is poised to reshape the future of medical care," said Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the medical faculty at Cedars-Sinai. "This project is an important initiative of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, whose goal is to drive the development of the newest technology and best research, coupled with the finest clinical practice, to rapidly enable a new era of personalized health."

Cells of a human intestinal lining, after being placed in an Intestine-Chip, form intestinal folds as they do in the human body.

Disclosure: Cedars-Sinai owns a minority stock interest in Emulate, Inc. An officer of Cedars-Sinai also serves on Emulate's board of directors. Emulate provides no financial support for this research.

Funding: Research reported in this news release was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (award number 1-UG3-NS-105703-01) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (award number R56DK106202-01) of the National Institutes of Health: the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute; the F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute; and the Joseph Drown Foundation.

Related story:
Scientists Re-Create Living Gut Lining on Chip


Image Credits
Top: Photo from Emulate Inc.
Bottom: Image from Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute

Scientists Re-Create Living Gut Lining on Chip

These miniature versions of a human intestinal lining, known as organoids, were generated using the science of induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, at Cedars-Sinai. Each cell of the organoids bore the unique genetic fingerprint and characteristics of an individual.

Investigators have demonstrated how cells of a human intestinal lining created outside an individual’s body mirror living tissue when placed inside microengineered Intestine-Chips, opening the door to personalized testing of drug treatments.

The findings have the potential to change how patients are treated for debilitating, inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases with a genetic component, such as Crohn's syndrome, ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome.

Instead of exposing a patient to drug treatments that may be costly, ineffective or carry harmful side effects, scientists could use the individual’s own stem cells to produce a duplicate of the intestinal lining on an Intestine-Chip and test multiple drugs on it. Scientists then could determine which drug worked best on that patient’s intestine.

The study was conducted by investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute and Emulate Inc. in Boston.

This advance will allow biomedical scientists to study the functioning of an individual's intestinal lining in a controlled microenvironment, where the lining can interact with immune cells, blood cells and drugs, said Robert Barrett, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine and research scientist at the Regenerative Medicine Institute. Barrett is senior author of the study, published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, a journal of the American Gastroenterology Association.

"This pairing of biology and engineering allows us to re-create an intestinal lining that matches that of a patient with a specific intestinal disease—without performing invasive surgery to obtain a tissue sample," said Clive Svendsen, PhD, director of the Regenerative Medicine Institute, professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine and a co-author of the study. "We can produce an unlimited number of copies of this tissue and use them to evaluate potential therapies. This is an important advance in personalized medicine."

The study team used two advanced technologies to produce and sustain the intestinal lining: Cedars-Sinai provided the induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, while Emulate supplied its Intestine-Chip, which is made out of a flexible polymer that features tiny channels that can be lined with thousands of living human cells.

To make the iPSCs, Cedars-Sinai investigators first took small samples of blood and skin cells from an adult. They reprogrammed these cells into iPSCs, which are similar to embryonic stem cells and can produce any type of body cell. Using special proteins and other substances, the scientists prodded the iPSCs to produce cells of the intestinal lining. Each cell bore the unique genetic fingerprint and characteristics of the adult who donated the original cells. The new cells were used to grow miniature versions of the person's intestine lining, known as organoids.

These miniature versions of a human intestinal lining, known as organoids, were generated using the science of iPSCs at Cedars-Sinai. Each cell of the organoids bore the unique genetic fingerprint and characteristics of an individual.

The team then selected cells from these organoids and placed them inside the Intestine-Chips, which are about the size of AA batteries and re-create the natural microenvironment of the human intestine, including the intestinal epithelium—the layer of cells that forms the lining of the small and large intestines. Fluids were passed through microchannels of these chips, creating an environment that enabled the cells to develop the 3-D villi-like structures as found in the intestine in the body. Tests showed that the intestinal lining the researchers formed contained all the key cell types normally found in such a tissue.

"Organ-Chips address major challenges in studying the human intestine and intestinal diseases in the lab," said Geraldine A. Hamilton, PhD, president and chief scientific officer of Emulate and a co-author of the study. "The Intestine-Chip is a ‘home away from home’ for human cells, and provides them with the right microenvironment and biological cues they need to behave just like they do in the body. Our Intestine-Chip also allows researchers to culture intestinal epithelial cells alongside other cell types, such as immune cells, and analyze how these different cell types interact.

"Further, by partnering with Cedars-Sinai to generate intestinal linings from iPSCs, we can match the Intestine-Chip to individual donors," Hamilton added.

The study was part of an initiative of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, whose goal is to drive the development of the newest technology and best research, coupled with the finest clinical practice, to rapidly enable a new era of personalized health.

Disclosure: Cedars-Sinai owns a minority stock interest in Emulate Inc. An officer of Cedars-Sinai also serves on Emulate’s board of directors. Emulate provides no financial support for this research.

Funding: Research reported in this news release was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award number R56DK106202-01, the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, the Cedars-Sinai F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute and the Drown Foundation.

Related story:
Cedars-Sinai, Emulate Advance Precision Medicine  


Image Credit
Image from Cedars-Sinai

FDA Warns About Prescribing Clarithromycin to Heart Patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising caution before prescribing the antibiotic clarithromycin (Biaxin) to patients with heart disease because of a potential increased risk of heart problems or death that can occur years later. The FDA recommendation is based on the review of a large clinical trial, which observed an unexpected increase in deaths among patients with coronary heart disease who received a two-week course of clarithromycin.

The FDA has more information.

CS-Link: Cleaning Up InBasket

To prevent needless clutter, avoid storing results in your InBasket even if you think you'll need to return to it later.

Results will always be part of the patient's chart and can be easily retrieved by going to your InBasket at the botton left of your screen. Check under "completed work," and click. Folders of previous work will pop up.

The CS-Link™ website has more information.

Also, HealthStream offers physician efficiency training modules for continuing medical education credit. There are 22 modules that last 15 minutes each. They include topics such as "In Basket Quick Actions," "Smart Blocks in Progress Notes" and "SmartList Editor."

To take advantage, log into HealthStream and search the catalog using these keywords: PET CME. Select the module you want to view, then click "Enroll."

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.