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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF November 16, 2018 | Archived Issues

Supporting Recovery Efforts for Fire and Shooting Victims

Cedars-Sinai will make donations dollar for dollar, up to $10,000, to support relief efforts to help the victims of the California wildfires. Employees can contribute online through a dedicated Cedars-Sinai webpage of the American Red Cross.

» Read more

Marina del Rey to Get New Hospital

Cedars-Sinai is embarking on an extensive construction project to replace the 50-year-old Marina del Rey Hospital with a new, state-of-the-art, nine-story structure

» Read more

We Want to Hear From You!

Cedars-Sinai is trying to improve the way we communicate with our employees. Please help us by filling out a short survey. The confidential survey only takes about 15 minutes to complete. It can be accessed here.

» Read more

President's Perspective: Everyone Deserves It

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

While everyone at Cedars-Sinai is rightfully proud of what we accomplish each day, it is equally important to focus on how we treat each other, our patients and ourselves. In this President’s Perspective, I’d like to focus on one of Cedars-Sinai’s core values, respect, and share the institutionwide expectations that apply to each and every one of us. A climate of mutual respect is not only something that every person deserves, it helps bring out the best in all of us.

» Read more

Spy Plane Pilot Now Welcomes Babies to the World

Cholene Espinoza, MD, is the second woman to fly a U-2 spy plane for the Air Force, and while her experience "touching the stars" was breathtaking, it doesn't compare to the magic of her richest role yet: welcoming babies to the world. Pulse is running her story in honor of Veterans Day, which was observed on Sunday, Nov. 11.

» Read more

A Trauma Surgeon on the Front Lines

Jason Pasley, DO, who joined the Department of Surgery in August, deployed to Afghanistan in 2014 and 2017 to serve as the trauma director of the 455th Expeditionary Medical Group, 455th Air Expeditionary Wing at Bagram Airfield, which is about 30 miles north of Kabul. Over both tours, the Air Force Lt. Colonel ran the central command’s busiest hospital, supervised scores of surgeons, nurses and technicians, performed hundreds of surgical operations and saved lives. He called directing the medical unit “balancing the chaos.”

» Read more

Advanced Genomic Profiling Now Available

The clinical impact of the new Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Gene panel is broad and will allow Cedars-Sinai to compete with academic medical centers and large reference laboratories to offer the best possible diagnostic testing.

» Read more

BMT Program Receives Blue Cross Designation

The Cedars-Sinai Blood and Marrow Transplant Program has been recognized as a Blue Cross Center of Medical Excellence. The designation is awarded to select hospitals that have demonstrated they provide superior specialty care.

» Read more

Clinical Informatics Seeking First Fellow

For the first time, the Division of Informatics has received accreditation from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for a Clinical Informatics Fellowship. The division is actively seeking its first fellow, which is open to residency graduates from any specialty.

» Read more

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

See production information updates for October from Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Bookmarks Save Time

Have you ever struggled to find your original visit or a path report in the media tab and then later wanted to return to that document in CS-Link™? Now you can bookmark it and easily find the documents again. You can even see bookmarks that your staff or colleagues have made as well. Using bookmarks is simple and will save you time.

» Read more

Supporting Recovery Efforts for Fire and Shooting Victims

By Andy Ortiz
Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Organization Development

Colleagues,

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Over the last few weeks, we have been shaken by news of immense loss and suffering of those close to home and across the country. As an organization dedicated to healing, we are profoundly saddened by the shootings in Pittsburgh and Thousand Oaks, and the wildfires in Southern and Northern California.

Cedars-Sinai stands ready to help.

We have made significant contributions to the Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation and to two separate funds that will directly aid shooting victims from the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks and the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

And now, we are matching donations dollar for dollar, up to $10,000, to fire relief efforts through the American Red Cross. Employees can contribute online through a dedicated Cedars-Sinai webpage or by dropping off checks at the lockbox in the Community Relations Office, Suite 2416, until Nov. 30. Checks should be made out to “American Red Cross” noting “California Fire Relief” in the memo line.

Proceeds will be directed to areas of greatest need.

Thank you for your generosity during these moments of great need. Your contributions are a demonstration of our unwavering commitment to compassion and healing.

Marina del Rey to Get New Hospital

Cedars-Sinai is embarking on an exciting plan to rebuild Cedars-Sinai Marina del Rey Hospital with a state-of-the-art facility that will allow those who live and work in the area and adjacent communities to receive high-quality healthcare without having to leave their neighborhoods.

The new building will be nine stories and feature all private rooms, expanded treatment facilities and new technology to support specialized services for patients.

"We’re excited to launch this vitally important project for Marina del Rey and neighboring communities so that residents have access to a high-quality community hospital with the latest technology just feet from their homes and offices," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO.

The current hospital will remain open with existing staff during construction, which is slated to begin in 2020 and expected to be completed by 2024. In addition to meeting all California seismic requirements, the new hospital will feature:

  • Additional inpatient capacity
  • All private patient rooms
  • State-of-the-art operating rooms, cardiac catherization and gastroenterology labs
  • New technology to support additional specialized services for patients

Expansion of the Emergency and Pharmacy departments will be complete by late 2019.

We Want to Hear From You!

Cedars-Sinai is trying to improve the way we communicate with our employees. Please help us by filling out a short survey.

Your feedback will help us enhance our internal newsletters (such as The Bridge, Pulse and Cedars-Science) and better understand how to bring important news and information to you. The survey takes only about 15 minutes to complete. It can be accessed here.

Please be assured that your responses are confidential.

Thank you in advance for participating. We look forward to hearing your opinions!

President's Perspective: Everyone Deserves It

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

While everyone at Cedars-Sinai is rightfully proud of what we accomplish each day, it is equally important to focus on how we treat each other, our patients and ourselves.

In this President’s Perspective, I’d like to focus on one of Cedars-Sinai’s core values, respect, and share the institutionwide expectations that apply to each and every one of us. A climate of mutual respect is not only something that every person deserves, it helps bring out the best in all of us.

An environment of mutual respect provides a workplace where everyone can feel safe (psychologically and physically), disagreements can be discussed and resolved respectfully and openly, and the diversity of our workforce, our patients and our community can be celebrated.

What are the key elements of an environment of mutual respect?

  1. Everyone deserves it, all the time, no exceptions.
    It doesn’t matter what a person’s role is or whether you report to them or they to you. It doesn’t matter whether they are a physician or not. It doesn’t matter what gender or sexual orientation they are. It doesn’t matter what race, ethnicity or nationality they are. Regardless of who the other person is, at Cedars-Sinai we expect you to show the same level of respect to everyone.
  2. Respect each other’s differences, and work to understand their point of view, even if you don’t personally agree with it.
    One of the best ways to show respect for anyone is to listen to them. It shows that you value them as a person. You don’t have to agree on everything, but listen thoroughly and keep an open mind. Disagreements are not, in and of themselves, disrespectful. In fact, it is through the respectful, open and civil discussion of disagreement—rather than bullying or passive-aggressive behavior—that organizations grow and change for the better.
  3. We expect it from everyone in our workforce, regardless of your position.
    No matter a person’s role in the organization, or how outstanding their work performance, we expect everyone to treat others with respect and civility—no exceptions.

In the coming months, Andy Ortiz and his colleagues in Human Resources & Organization Development will be offering trainings, opportunities for discussion and additional communications about respect in the workplace. Our goal is to further strengthen the environment of respect at Cedars-Sinai, by listening to your thoughts about respect in the workplace (including your thoughts on how we can improve) and providing the tools, training and discussions to help everyone.

Spy Plane Pilot Now Welcomes Babies to the World

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After decades as an Air Force and commercial airline pilot, Cholene Espinoza, MD, turned to a medical career and started her residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai in June 2015.

A Veterans Day Story

When Cholene Espinoza, MD, looks back on her childhood, she remembers imperfections and failure.

"I was always kind of a screw-up as a kid," said Espinoza, chief resident in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. "I started first grade when I was five, so I was always feeling behind and was often put in the corner for being disruptive in class. I was independent and never really fit in to the traditional educational system."

For years, Espinoza struggled to focus academically and socially, but the summer before seventh grade she had an epiphany: "I remember telling my mom I didn't want to be a loser anymore."

She hasn't let her mom down. Espinoza's stellar career and life have played like a Hollywood movie with her roles, including: an elite spy plane pilot; a passenger originally scheduled to board one of the ill-fated planes on 9/11; a wartime journalist; a Hurricane Katrina volunteer; a published author; and finally, an OB-GYN who has a profound reverence for human life.

Espinoza’s Military Career Takes Flight

At 17, Espinoza enrolled in the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. In the 1980s, when she was a young cadet, the academy limited female enrollment to just 10 percent of a class. (With those gender restrictions now gone, last year's freshman class at the academy was about one-fourth female.)

"Like anything in life, there were moments when I struggled, and things or comments happened that shouldn't have," she said. "But it taught me to surround myself with supportive, good people and to work through the hardships.

But more hardships were to come. Around Christmas of her sophomore year, Espinoza's father died. The shock and grief soon led her to an unexpected, but clear path.

"I was taking a course in glider flying and it enabled me to get over my father’s death on some level," she said. "Flying came natural to me when nothing else in my life had."

After graduating, Espinoza served as a flying instructor for four years, and later, she was selected as a U-2 spy plane pilot for the 99th Reconnaissance Squadron at Beale Air Force Base, California—the only U-2 squadron in the Air Force.

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Espinoza is shown next to a T-38 Talon supersonic jet.

U-2 spy planes are single-jet engine, ultra-light gliders that maneuver on the edge of the earth's atmosphere. Designed to avoid enemy detection, the planes are equipped with sophisticated instrumentation that provides vital intelligence, day or night and in all-weather.

In a 12-hour mission, the aircraft can capture extraordinarily detailed imagery of a country the size of Iraq. And while much about the aircraft remains classified, Espinoza points out the planes do far more than reconnaissance—they also aid in peacekeeping and directing humanitarian aid.

Flying solo missions in U-2 plane can be an otherworldly, almost spiritual experience, said Espinoza. Wrapped in the cocoon of her space gear, she can sometimes still feel the stillness of the open sky and the brilliance of the earth.

"I would fly across Europe all night and it felt as though I could just reach out and touch the stars," she said.

But along with the beauty came harsh reminders of the chaos on the ground.

"I would fly over beautiful civilizations like France and Germany, but when I made it to my target areas, it would be pitch black," she said. "Then, I would see a flash of light and know it was a blast, and that meant someone is killing or someone is dying. It always gave me reverence for how fragile human life is and how unjust war is."

Espinoza observed war from the quiet remove of a spy plane, but with each mission she would feel a stronger urge to assist those affected on the ground.

"I couldn’t directly help people from the stratosphere and that propelled me to eventually get out of the Air Force cockpit," she said.

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Espinoza flew as a commercial airline pilot after leaving the Air Force.

From Above 70,000 Feet to 30,000 Feet

Espinoza left the Air Force for a career in commercial flying with United Airlines and then Emirates Airlines—allowing her to travel to every continent except Antarctica.

"As a commercial pilot, I had to be broken of my `single pilot mindset' and not disregard input from others," said Espinoza. "Success was based on the efficacy and quality of the entire crew."

Espinoza was working for United Airlines on September 11, 2001, when terrorists hijacked four aircrafts and slammed two of them into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon. The fourth aircraft crashed into field in the Pennsylvania countryside.

She was not scheduled to fly the fourth plane hijacked that day, but was supposed to be a passenger. The flight boarded in Newark and was supposed to land in San Francisco. It never made it.

"I was living in New York City at the time and had just accepted a bid to be a captain out of San Francisco," said Espinoza. "I planned to take the flight as a passenger to find a new home in San Francisco, but the crew desk realized I had gone over my flight limitation hours, so the first leg of my trip was cancelled, and I wasn’t on Flight 93."

Espinoza’s United Airlines colleague and former academy classmate, Leroy Homer, Jr., was co-piloting the airplane that crashed in Pennsylvania.

"I knew Leroy since I was 17 and had just seen him in London on a layover," said Espinoza. "He was happier and more content than I’d ever known him to be, showing me pictures of his daughter and wife. I often think of him that day in Hyde Park, with his smile, wishing I’d been there for him on that flight."

Espinoza’s Service Shifts From Sky to Ground

The events of 9/11 prompted her to take a pair of three-month leaves from United Airlines to cover the Iraq war as a civilian radio journalist. She toured with the Marine Corps and the Army second. Espinoza worked as an embedded journalist for Talk Radio News Service (now Talk Media News), which gave her an opportunity to come face-to-face with war—both its injustice and its heroism.

"I departed Iraq from a mobile hospital and there were surgeons trying to save children who had limbs blown off from mines and ammunition," said Espinoza. "The medical teams were trying to make something right out of something so horribly wrong. When you’re in the middle of a war, you see the destruction and insanity of it, and then you see these beautiful acts."

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Espinoza was an embedded radio journalist with Marines and the Army during the Iraq War.

Espinoza witnessed how war changes people.

"In order for me to overcome what war had done to me, I needed to engage and fix what was broken," she said. "That’s what inspired me to leave the cockpit for good and directly take care of people by switching careers from pilot and journalist, to doctor."

But before taking care of people as a doctor, Espinoza’s desire to serve brought her to Mississippi’s Gulf Coast in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina.

"On our first trip to Mississippi, my spouse and I connected with a small community and fell in love with the people and their struggle," said Espinoza. "We realized how many people drowned from the storm because they didn’t know how to swim, since there were no community centers or public swimming pools."

So, the couple made it their mission to change the community’s access to water safety by raising money to build a public swimming pool. Amid rebuilding and spending all of her down time and vacation days on the Gulf Coast, Espinoza penned a book, Through the Eye of the Storm: A Book Dedicated to Rebuilding What Katrina Washed Away.

"I realized each of us has something to give and that gift is desperately needed in our world," said Espinoza. "For me, being gay had not stopped me from serving two of my greatest loves in life, God and country. This book is the story of my life, the lives of truly heroic Americans and the transformation of my spirit that took place unexpectedly in this small Mississippi town."

The proceeds raised from the book, which she wrote and published in less than one year, supported the rebuilding of one of the most hurricane-ravaged communities on the Gulf Coast. The writing process helped Espinoza accept herself completely.

"It wasn’t until I was out of the service that I wrestled with my own identity," said Espinoza. "In the service, I didn’t have relationships with women, I focused on flying. I had tried to deny that part of who I was but realized through the writing and humanitarian process a stronger desire to live authentically."

Becoming a Doctor: Her Final Mission

In 2009, after what many would consider an already fulfilling and long career, Espinoza started her journey of becoming a doctor. Then 45 years old, Espinoza started over with pre-med and then graduated from St. George's University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies at the age of 50.

"I have the distinction of starting menopause and residency at the same time," Espinoza joked.

Espinoza started her residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai in June 2015 and is scheduled to finish this coming June. She has been accepted to be re-commissioned into the military as a Reserve U.S. Army OB-GYN. She can be deployed to any medical surgical unit, nationally or internationally.

"Military medicine is what first inspired me, but I thought I was too old for the military," said Espinoza. "But they desperately need doctors."

While she’s not serving on reserve duty, Espinoza plans to work as a doctor in South Sudan, where she has been working and traveling for over six years.

"With each trip, I can do more, because I’ve learned more here at Cedars-Sinai," she said.

Above all, residency has been the challenge of her lifetime.

"With medicine and obstetrics specifically, there are no permissible errors," said Espinoza. "It’s the same as flying jets—there is a certain level of intensity and desire to execute perfection, which drives and motivates me to work harder every single day."

But, as Espinoza knows, whether in war or in medicine, mistakes are inevitable.

"I start each day with a sense of humility and respect for human life and for people across all socioeconomic levels," she said. "That humility comes from seeing a lot of bad things happen and knowing I, too, have made mistakes. But every day is an opportunity to try to do better, let go and forgive ourselves."

And at a time in her life when many people would be slowing down, Espinoza is relishing her uncharted journey ahead.

"I have been blessed with a rich life and experiences, but without question—the most magical, beautiful thing I have ever experienced in my life or career is being in the room when a baby is born," she said. "Any pain, loss, or hurt parents may have previously felt evaporates the split second their baby is born. Witnessing and participating in birth is the privilege of a lifetime."

A Trauma Surgeon on the Front Lines

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Jason Pasley, who joined the Department of Surgery in August, served two tours of duty as the director of the trauma unit at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan.

A Veterans Day Story

Even for a trauma surgeon who had worked inner city hospitals in Baltimore and Los Angeles, what Jason Pasley, DO, saw come through the swinging doors of his military hospital in Bagram, Afghanistan, was a shock.

A suicide bomber had detonated his explosive vest near a local playground. The bomber's target was a group of Allied soldiers, but among those caught in the hail of flying rock and hot metal were three kids—ages 6, 12 and 17.

"It was scary," said Pasley, who joined the Department of Surgery in August, about the bombing that occurred during his second deployment to Afghanistan. "We had three critically injured kids that all needed surgery. For most people working that day this was their first deployment. They weren’t trauma specialists and they didn’t expect to see that."

During both his deployments, in 2014 and 2017, the Air Force Lt. Colonel served as the trauma director of the 455th Expeditionary Medical Group, 455th Air Expeditionary Wing at Bagram Airfield, which is about 30 miles north of Kabul. Over both tours, he ran the central command’s busiest hospital, supervised scores of surgeons, nurses and technicians, performed hundreds of surgical operations and saved lives. He called directing the medical unit "balancing the chaos."

Most of the hospital’s patients were soldiers—American, Allied, Afghan and even Taliban. But sometimes, as in the case with the suicide bomber, the patients were children.

"After the initial shock of getting pediatric patients," he said, "we treated them like we would anyone else and got to work."

One child needed a two-hour surgery to wash out a leg wound and repair a major vein, which had been lacerated by shrapnel. Another required an hour-long surgery to remove part of their small intestine, and the third was relatively lucky, suffering a broken bone. All the children survived and were discharged from the military hospital within a week or two.

"After a couple of days, their parents got security clearance and they were able to visit them," said Pasley. "They were very appreciative. And we were able to find some Disney movies for the kids in their native language."

Traits of a Trauma Surgeon

Part of the eight-square-mile military base, the hospital had an ebb and flow to its volume of patients. Sometimes, Pasley’s unit, which had about 30-beds, would receive five to 10 patients at once. Other times, up to 20. And, still other times, they’d get one, two, or—if they were lucky—zero.

As the only trauma surgeon at the hospital, he was on-call 24 hours a day. He was one of the few medical personnel that had a room in the hospital, which is where he slept.

"I would leave the hospital to go eat, and I’d try to see a movie every once in a while," he said. "But we were still always on the compound."

It takes a special personality type to be a trauma surgeon, especially in a war zone, said Pasley. After searching for the right words, he quickly settled on the occupation’s most salient trait: "You have to work well under pressure."

"I love the adrenaline, you never know what’s going to come through the door," he added. "Nobody intended for this to happen to them on that day. So, you’re taking care of the patient and helping out the family. I like being there to support the patient and family in a time of crisis and start the healing process."

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Pasley says hello to Los Angeles Dodger Justin Turner at a ball game this summer at Dodger Stadium where Pasley was recognized for his military service.

Getting Used to Rocket Attacks

The transition from civilian to military life wasn’t made any easier for Pasley by the random shelling of the Bagram base. The military outpost was a frequent target of rockets from the surrounding hillsides. For Pasley, the attacks led to their own set of self-preservation rituals.

First, an alarm goes off, said Pasley, then you put on body armor. You drop to the ground and lay there until the all-clear signal sounds. The episodes can last minutes, as anti-rocket measures are deployed to knock down, or at least break up, the rocket. The attacks would occur day or night—sometimes once a day.

"It was terrifying, especially at first," said Pasley.

The hardest part about his deployment was being away from his family. Pasley had just gotten married—his wife is also a surgeon—about a month before he shipped out.

"My wife was going through a move and starting a new job and I was trying to be her support," said Pasley, who stayed in touch through Facetime, texting and email. "But it’s hard to be her support if you’re half a world away."

The Worst of Days

A month into this first deployment, Pasley had one of his worst days on the job. An American soldier had been shot, leaving terrible wounds to his chest and abdomen. Medics had been giving the soldier CPR for 15 to 20 minutes before arriving at the military hospital, Pasley said.

The soldier’s chest was opened up, a clamp was placed on aorta, as Pasley and his team desperately tried to get the young man’s heart started again. Their efforts to revive the soldier furiously continued for a half-hour.

Finally, they stopped.

"There was nothing we could do for him and he passed away right there," said Pasley. "It was the hardest thing I had to do because it was the first American soldier I had to declare dead. It was more than a little emotional for me."

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Pasley shakes hands with President Barack Obama when the nation's chief executive made a surprise visit to Afghanistan in 2014.

Being Each Other’s Wingman

After such upsetting events, Pasley and his team would hold a de-briefing session. They would talk about what happened, what went right, what may have potentially gone wrong, and what they could do better next time.

"Most of the time, there wasn’t much we could have done better," he said. "We always talked about being each other’s wingman to make sure everyone was okay emotionally."

During his first tour, if someone reached their unit alive, they had a 97.7 percent chance of survival. On his second tour, the unit’s rate of survival went up to 99.3 percent. As a result of his leadership, Pasley was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal and the Commendation Medal.

A Presidential Visit

Around Memorial Day in 2014, Pasley received an unusual order—to temporarily give up his sidearm, something most personnel were expected to carry in a war zone. The reason was a special visitor was coming, but there was no mention of who.

It turned out to be President Barack Obama. Pasley ended up shaking hands with the former President and also held a brief conversation. The 44th President thanked Pasley for his work at the hospital.

"He was very genuine and very nice," said Pasley. "It was a pleasure to meet him."

Salute to Veterans Serving Now

Pasley’s focus at Cedars-Sinai now is on his patients and his research. As a surgeon with combat experience, he is especially interested in developing better ways to control bleeding. He’s been an instructor for the Stop the Bleed campaign, which seeks to teach ordinary citizens how to help reduce the loss of life due to traumatic bleeding.

Though he’s far away from a war zone in Afghanistan, he often thinks of the friends he made there and those serving now.

"Even though you don’t hear about it in the news much anymore, there is still a war going on," said Pasley. "There are still many people a long way from home, away from their families, defending our country. I'm thankful for them, and I’m thankful for what the military has done for me."

Advanced Genomic Profiling Now Available

The clinical impact of the new Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Gene panel is broad and will allow Cedars-Sinai to compete with academic medical centers and large reference laboratories to offer the best possible diagnostic testing.

"We developed our Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Gene panel in alignment with the National Cancer Institute to assure that we can detect every possible DNA mutation and genomic alteration that has an FDA-approved therapy, an 'off label' drug treatment, or clinical trial eligibility," said Eric Vail, MD, director of Molecular Pathology in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. "Coupled with a quick turnaround time, measured in days instead of weeks, we can profile hundreds to thousands of patients each year."

Additionally, the panel can be easily ordered in CS-Link™ with the genomic findings interpreted in the context of the patient's other lab results and clinical information, which reference labs simply cannot do.

Cedars-Sinai’s next-generation sequencing capabilities now report point mutations, insertions, deletions, translocations, copy number variations, tumor mutational burden and microsatellite instability.

"Comprehensive interpretation is provided by our expert molecular genetic pathologists for every case, and on-site consultation is readily available," said Vail. "With these capabilities patients will be opened up to options like immunotherapy and clinical trials that may have been limited before."

BMT Program Receives Blue Cross Designation

The Cedars-Sinai Blood and Marrow Transplant Program has been recognized as a Blue Cross Center of Medical Excellence.

The designation is awarded to select hospitals that have demonstrated they provide superior specialty care. Evidence-based standards must be met to be considered for the designation, including patient outcomes, treatment expertise, breadth of care and safety.

The Blood and Marrow Transplant Program was established in 1989 and has performed more than 1,500 stem cell and bone marrow transplants. The program has been a National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match transplant center since 2001.

Clinical Informatics Seeking First Fellow

For the first time, the Division of Informatics has received accreditation from the American Medical Informatics Association for a Clinical Informatics Fellowship. The division is actively seeking its first fellow to begin July 1, 2019, and is open to residency graduates from any specialty.

"Physician informaticists frequently function as a liaison between clinicians and Enterprise Information Services," said Joshua Pevnick, MD, program director of the Clinical Informatics Fellowship. "They provide an invaluable service of communicating directly with other physicians about workflow changes and new technologies, while understanding how any change may impact patient care and organizational excellence."

The two-year fellowship program includes rotations across Cedars-Sinai, working with over 15 different Cedars-Sinai-based clinician informaticists (including seven physicians board-certified in clinical informatics) across several specialties and practice settings. Upon completion, fellows will become eligible for board certification in clinical informatics.

Rotations cover many areas across clinical informatics, including workflow analysis, design, and optimization, electronic health record (EHR) implementation, change management, EHR usability, system build, clinical decision support, quality and performance assessment and improvement, data analytics, research informatics, data security, interoperability, research, leadership, pharmacy informatics and pathology informatics.

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

Product information updates for October from Pharmacy and Therapeutics are summarized in the PDF link below.

P and T Approvals - October 2018 (PDF)  

CS-Link Tip: Bookmarks Save Time

Have you ever struggled to find your original visit or a path report in the media tab and then later wanted to return to that document in CS-Link™?

Now you can bookmark it and easily find the documents again. You can even see bookmarks that your staff or colleagues have made as well. Using bookmarks is simple and will save you time.

To learn more, watch this video.