Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF September 21, 2018 | Archived Issues

Physicians Invited to Free Wellness Course Oct. 19

Physicians are encouraged to attend a free one-day wellness course on Friday, Oct. 19, to learn ways to find balance between personal and professional life, and address and manage burnout. The course is being led by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, and is sponsored by Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, and the medical staff.

» Read more

Supporting Cedars-Sinai’s Hurricane Relief Efforts

Cedars-Sinai will make donations dollar for dollar, up to $10,000, to support relief efforts to help the victims of Hurricane Florence. The historic storm has caused catastrophic flooding across the region, leaving thousands displaced from their homes. Employees can contribute online through a dedicated Cedars-Sinai web page of the American Red Cross.

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Flu Shots

By Clement C. Yang, MD, Chief of Staff

Flu shots are now available for free through the medical center’s flu clinics. Similar to last year, all medical staff and employees are required to be vaccinated against the flu by Oct. 12, unless they have an approved exemption.

» Read more

Keith L. Black, MD, to Receive Pioneer in Medicine Award at Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff

Keith L. Black, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, and director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, will receive the Pioneer in Medicine Award at the annual meeting of the medical staff on Monday, Oct. 22, at 11:30 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

Staff Can Enter Drawing to Win Rams Tickets

As the official health partner of the Los Angeles Rams, Cedars-Sinai is offering staff an opportunity to receive free tickets through a random drawing to home games of the storied NFL franchise this season. To participate in the drawing for the Rams tickets, fill out a brief online form.

» Read more

BlackDoctor.org Honors Cedars-Sinai for Diversity

BlackDoctor.org, the popular online health information resource for African-American consumers, has named Cedars-Sinai to its 2018 Top Hospitals for Diversity List. BlackDoctor.org specifically cited Cedars-Sinai for its strong commitment in promoting equity and inclusion in the health system's operations, programs, services and staffing.

» Read more

Ronald G. Victor, MD: 1952-2018

Ronald G. Victor, MD, a prominent hypertension expert and the first investigator to scientifically prove that thousands of lives could be saved annually if barbers were enlisted to help fight the epidemic of high blood pressure in the African-American community, died Sept. 10. He was 66.

» Read more

James Kevin Drury, MD: 1949-2018

James Kevin Drury, MD, an active member of the medical staff as an attending in the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, has died. He was 68. A memorial service will be held at St. Cyril's Catholic Church, 15520 Ventura Blvd., Saturday, Oct. 20, at 1 p.m. A “Celebration of Life” will follow.

» Read more

Frank S. Williams, MD: 1934-2018

Frank S. Williams, MD, an active member of the medical staff as an attending in the Department of Psychiatry since 1965, has died. He was 84. Williams was the former chief of Family, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Cedars-Sinai. He was an advisor to the Cedars-Sinai Share and Care Program.

» Read more

Weeklong Holiday of Sukkot Begins Sept. 23

The Jewish Festival of Sukkot begins at sunset Sunday, Sept. 23, and lasts until dusk Monday, Oct. 1. The holiday will bring the construction of a large bamboo hut on the Plaza Level Terrace by the end of the week. The hut is called a sukkah, a temporary shelter that serves as a hub for the weeklong celebration.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Reverified as Level 1 Trauma Center

Cedars-Sinai was recently recertified as a Level 1 Trauma Center by the Verification Review Committee, an ad hoc group of the Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons.

» Read more

HbA1c Testing to be Updated Oct. 8

Special Testing within the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will update the reported reference intervals for HbA1c testing beginning Monday, Oct. 8.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 77 people in August. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Practicing Inbasket Hygiene

Do you need to practice better Inbasket hygiene? In CS-Link™, these tips can help keep it tidy and make it less likely you’ll miss important messages.

» Read more

Physicians Invited to Free Wellness Course Oct. 19

Physicians are encouraged to attend a free one-day wellness course on Friday, Oct. 19, to learn ways to balance between personal and professional life, and address and manage burnout.

The course, led by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences and sponsored by Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, and the medical staff, will be held in Harvey Morse Auditorium. It also is open to other clinical staff, including nurses and allied health professionals.

"Stress and burnout continue to be topics among our staff, but little attention has been paid to interventions," said Waguih W. IsHak, MD, vice chair of Education and Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. "There are tangible, proven interventions—both individual and systemwide—that can help our healthcare teams feel more supported and find better balance in their personal and professional lives."

The course will feature several guest speakers from the organization, discussing topics such as:

  • Understanding the internal and external factors that cause a decrease in wellbeing
  • Developing systems-based interventions to incorporate and sustain wellness into your daily routine
  • Practicing methods of wellness promotion
  • Utilizing the healing power of humor

In the U.S., healthcare professionals suffer from burnout more than other workers. And while extensive research suggests the issue may have profound effects on an individual, it also indicates it may have major consequences on the quality of patient care.

"We are committed to changing the statistics and ensuring our healthcare professionals have the tools needed to be resilient and manage the complexities of practicing medicine," said Clement C. Yang, MD, FACP, chief of staff. "Thanks to the generous support of Mr. Priselac, we can address the concerns affecting our brilliant healers and help them find joy in medicine once again."

In addition to guest speakers, the course also will include breakout sessions focused on practical, tangible strategies to help nurture overall wellbeing.

"A healthcare professional has to maintain a balanced life—a balance between work, love and play—in order to keep their healing power," said IsHak. "The course is intended to help learn and achieve that."

Space is limited. Register at the Wellness Course website using the following codes:

  • Faculty and medical staff: WELLNESS18
  • Fellows and residents: HSWELL18
  • Allied health professionals: AHWELL18

Supporting Cedars-Sinai’s Hurricane Relief Efforts

By Andy Ortiz
Senior Vice President, Human Resources & Organization Development

News coverage of Hurricane Florence and the devastation across the Carolinas has been heart-wrenching. The historic storm has caused catastrophic flooding across the region, leaving hundreds of thousands without power and thousands displaced from their homes and living in temporary shelters. Damage estimates are expected to total between $17 billion and $22 billion.

Cedars-Sinai is eager to help. As we’ve seen with other natural disasters, our employees are ready to lend assistance. If you would like to contribute to hurricane relief efforts, you can do so online through a dedicated Cedars-Sinai webpage of the American Red Cross. Employees also may drop off checks at the lockbox in the Community Relations Office, Suite 2416, until Friday, Sept. 28. Checks should be made out to "American Red Cross," and the notes section should designate "Hurricane Florence."

To maximize the impact of our employees’ generosity, Cedars-Sinai will match donations dollar for dollar, up to $10,000. Proceeds will be directed to areas of greatest need.

We have a proud tradition at Cedars-Sinai of caring for others in times of adversity. We have given generously to support relief efforts after disasters like Hurricane Harvey last year and earthquakes in Ecuador and Japan in 2016. Our desire to help others in moments of great need truly reflects Cedars-Sinai’s core values and mission.

Thank you for everything you do to make Cedars-Sinai a world-class organization we all are proud to serve.

Letter From Chief of Staff: Flu Shots

Dear Colleagues,

Flu shots are now available for free through the medical center’s flu clinics. Similar to last year, all medical staff and employees are required to be vaccinated against the flu by Oct. 12, unless they have an approved exemption.

The schedule for vaccination clinics is as follows:

  • Friday, Sept. 21, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., ECC-A
  • Monday, Sept. 24, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Tuesday, Sept. 25, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Wednesday, Sept. 26, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Thursday, Sept. 27, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6
  • Friday, Sept. 28, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Harvey Morse Conference Room 6

More flu clinic dates will be posted soon.

The process to attest your flu vaccination status has been simplified this year. All medical staff and allied health professionals will receive a CS-Link™ inbox message to attest their vaccination status beginning Oct. 1. Those who have not responded by Oct. 31 will receive alerts as a reminder to respond when they log into CS-Link.

If you get vaccinated at a Cedars-Sinai flu clinic, green badge buddies will be issued at the time of vaccination, and people with an approved medical exemption or religious accommodation will receive a gray badge buddy from Employee Health Services. All badge buddies must be visibly worn by Nov. 1.

If you choose to be vaccinated elsewhere, upon responding to the CS-Link inbox message your badge buddy will be sent to your designated mailing address if not picked up from the medical staff office within two business days.

Additional information can be found in the attached Frequently Asked Questions document below.

Flu Immunization Policy FAQs 2018-19 (PDF)  

Thank you all for your efforts to keep our patients, visitors and colleagues safe during the upcoming flu season.

Clement C. Yang, MD

Chief of Staff

Keith L. Black, MD, to Receive Pioneer in Medicine Award at Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff

Keith L. Black, MD

Keith L. Black, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, and director of the Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute, will receive the Pioneer in Medicine Award at the annual meeting of the medical staff on Monday, Oct. 22, at 11:30 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

Black is being recognized for his significant clinical contributions in research and his outstanding track record as a clinician, creative teacher and mentor to a generation of neurologic clinical scientists and researchers. In addition to his ongoing innovations in the field of neurosurgery and neuroscience, Black has helped create a nationally and internationally recognized center of excellence for neurosurgical and neurological diseases at Cedars-Sinai.

Other agenda items for the annual meeting include the chief of staff report, executive update and the Chief of Staff Award.

Staff Can Enter Drawing to Win Rams Tickets

As the official health partner of the Los Angeles Rams, Cedars-Sinai is offering staff an opportunity to receive free tickets through a random drawing to home games of the storied NFL franchise this season.

Winners will receive a pair of tickets. Staff may enter the drawing only once and can win only once this season. Winners will be notified by email.

The Rams home games this season are:

  • Sunday, Sept. 23 v. San Diego Chargers
  • Thursday, Sept. 27 v. Minnesota Vikings
  • Sunday, Oct. 28 v. Green Bay Packers
  • Sunday, Nov. 11 v. Seattle Seahawks
  • Sunday, Dec. 16 v. Philadelphia Eagles
  • Sunday, Dec. 30 v. San Francisco 49ers

To participate in the drawing for the Rams tickets, fill out a brief online form.

BlackDoctor.org Honors Cedars-Sinai for Diversity

BlackDoctor.org, the popular online health information resource for African-American consumers, has named Cedars-Sinai to its 2018 Top Hospitals for Diversity List.

BlackDoctor.org specifically cited Cedars-Sinai for its strong commitment in promoting equity and inclusion in the health system's operations, programs, services and staffing. The honor recognizes Cedars-Sinai's ongoing commitment to build and sustain excellence in its diverse academic and medical community.

"Diversity and inclusion are two of our institutional values, and it's a tremendous honor to be recognized for these efforts among an elite group of hospitals," said Andy Ortiz, senior vice president of Human Resources and Organization Development. "We strive to not only ensure diversity among our employees, but also to be culturally sensitive and in tune with the needs of all the communities we serve."

In addition to recognizing Cedars-Sinai's high-quality healthcare services and patient care, the award acknowledges the cultural sensitivity demonstrated by the organization's medical and professional staff, and inclusion and diversity within clinical and administrative staff. Hospitals that make it onto the BlackDoctor.org Diversity List also have people of color and women represented at the highest levels of the organization, including the board of directors and senior executive team.

Additionally, the honor credits Cedars-Sinai's ongoing dedication to its community health programs, such as the COACH for Kids® mobile medical units and the Healthy Habits nutrition and fitness education program taught in 28 Los Angeles public schools.

"Our 30 million-plus audience places a great importance upon cultural competency and sensitivity when it comes to the entire healthcare delivery system," said Reginald Ware, chief executive officer of BlackDoctor.org. "Organizations who are working hard to see that everyone is treated fairly, regardless of race or creed, are highlighted with this top honor."

Ronald G. Victor, MD: 1952-2018

Barber Wally Riddle takes the blood pressure of Ronald Victor, MD.

Ronald G. Victor, MD, a prominent hypertension expert and the first investigator to scientifically prove that thousands of lives could be saved annually if barbers were enlisted to help fight the epidemic of high blood pressure in the African-American community, died Sept. 10. He was 66.

An associate director of the Smidt Heart Institute since 2009, Victor published his most recent barbershop study results earlier this year in The New England Journal of Medicine and presented them as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American College of Cardiology’s 67th Annual Scientific Sessions. The results showed nearly 64 percent of study participants reduced their blood pressure to healthy levels after barbers took patrons’ blood pressure and then urged those with high readings to follow-up with pharmacists stationed in the barbershops.

"Dr. Victor showed genuine care and concern for our community’s high blood pressure problem, particularly as it affected black men," said Eric Muhammad, owner of A New You Barbershop in Inglewood, who helped Victor recruit African-American barbers and patrons for the trial and is listed as an author on the published study. "This doctor was an exceptional human being and one of the most humble men I’ve ever met. He didn’t see color or class. He didn’t see anything but our blood pressure problem."

Uncontrolled hypertension is one of the most prevalent causes of premature disability and death among minorities. African-American men have the highest death rate from hypertension of any race, ethnic group or gender group in the United States—three times higher than white men.

"Where others saw intractable challenges, Ron saw novel solutions," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Smidt Heart Institute and a friend of Victor’s for 26 years. "His out-of-the-box thinking has created a new paradigm for serving neglected populations: Bring medicine to at-risk people rather than waiting for sickness to rear its ugly head, when it’s often too late."

Shlomo Melmed, MD, executive vice president for Academic Affairs and dean of the Cedars-Sinai medical faculty, said Victor has left behind an unforgettable legacy of medical discoveries as well as a reputation as a gentle academic who carried on with his research even as he battled a long illness.

"Ron and his wife, Vicki (Adams Victor), have endeared themselves as brave and cherished Cedars-Sinai family members both by their warmth and sensitivity, as well as by the modest self-effacing recognition of Ron’s immense standing in the field of hypertension," Melmed said. "Ron, a true giant in the field, has left a rich, stellar legacy that will likely benefit millions of patients worldwide. As we comfort Vicki and the Victor family, we all miss his good humor, positive and optimistic attitude and demonstration of such incredible steadfastness in the face of adversity."

Other patients who benefitted from Victor’s work include young men and boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a neuromuscular disease that leads to progressive degeneration of body muscles, including the heart. Most Duchenne patients lose their ability to walk by their mid-teens, and their average life expectancy is about 25 years. The usual cause of death is heart failure.

Results from a Victor-led study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in 2017 showed that after boys and young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy received infusions of cardiac progenitor cells, medical tests indicated that the patients' hearts appeared improved. Participants in the study also scored higher on arm strength tests after receiving the cell infusions.

But Victor was best known for his work in combatting hypertension in the African-American community. According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 67 million—or one in every three—American adults have high blood pressure, and fewer than half have their condition under control. High blood pressure costs the nation $47.5 billion each year, including the cost of healthcare, medication and missed work days. Among African-Americans, 43 percent of men and 45.7 percent of women have hypertension compared with 33.9 percent of white men and 31.3 percent of white women.

"Through the Los Angeles study, Dr. Victor helped nearly 400 men who had hypertension," Muhammad said. "But his effect was so much broader than that because those men now teach their children and their sisters and their brothers and their friends. He really made a difference in the black community."

Victor first became interested in teaching African-American barbers how to measure patrons’ blood pressure in the 1990s when he was at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, where he was the founding director of the Houston J. and Florence A. Doswell Center for the Development of New Approaches to the Treatment of Hypertension.

His first barbershop study was done in Dallas from 2006 to 2008. Its conclusion: Putting hypertension intervention programs in place in the estimated 18,000 African-American barbershops in the U.S. would result in about 800 fewer heart attacks, 550 fewer strokes and 900 fewer deaths in the first year alone. The new work published earlier this year in The New England Journal of Medicine, in which pharmacists were deployed at barbershops, showed even greater benefits, projecting that barbershop-based hypertension programs could save thousands of lives every year.

Victor’s barbershop work resulted in hundreds of media interviews and led to several awards, including the Humanitarian Award from the Professional Barber and Stylists Committee and the James E. Smith Trailblazer Award from the Texas Association of Tonsorial Artists. Victor also was recognized for his work by the medical community. He served as president of the Association of University Cardiologists, and he was the primary investigator on more than 140 studies published in peer-reviewed medical journals. But perhaps his most cherished award came just weeks ago, when Victor’s colleagues at the Smidt Heart Institute held a symposium to honor his contributions to medicine. The symposium title: A Breakthrough Achievement in Bringing Diagnosis and Treatment to a Vulnerable Population.

Born in 1952 in New Orleans, Victor earned his undergraduate degree summa cum laude with distinction at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, where he was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society. He earned his medical degree from Tulane University in New Orleans. He completed two residencies at UCLA before completing cardiology fellowships at Duke University in North Carolina, University of Iowa and University of Uppsala in Sweden.

Among his many awards and honors, Victor was a member of the editorial boards of Circulation and the Journal of Clinical Hypertension. In medical circles, he is known for co-authoring the influential textbook Kaplan’s Clinical Hypertension with his mentor, Norman M. Kaplan, MD. When Victor lived in Dallas, he served as the president of the Dallas affiliate of the American Heart Association, and in 2009, he was president of the Association of University Cardiologists. At Cedars-Sinai, Victor was the Burns and Allen Chair in Cardiology Research.

He is survived by his wife, Vicki, his sister, Sally Victor Siegel, and his father, Harold D. Victor. Victor will be buried in New Orleans. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be directed "In Memory of Dr. Victor" and made to the Smidt Heart Institute. All gifts will be used to further Victor’s pioneering work in community intervention efforts to combat hypertension in neglected high-risk populations.

James Kevin Drury, MD: 1949-2018

James Kevin Drury, MD

James Kevin Drury, MD, an active member of the medical staff as an attending in the Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, has died. He was 68.

The native of Montreal, Quebec, died Sept. 7 at his Encino home after a nine-year battle with multiple myeloma.

A memorial service will be held at St. Cyril's Catholic Church, 15520 Ventura Blvd., Saturday, Oct. 20, at 1 p.m. A "Celebration of Life" will follow.

Drury’s contributions and invaluable service to the medical center and to the community will be greatly missed.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that a contribution be made to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

For more about Drury, see his Los Angeles Times obituary.

Frank S. Williams, MD: 1934-2018

Frank S. Williams, MD

Frank S. Williams, MD, an active member of the medical staff as an attending in the Department of Psychiatry since 1965, has died. He was 84.

Williams was the former chief of Family, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Cedars-Sinai. He was an advisor to the Cedars-Sinai Share and Care Program. He served as the director of the Division of Child Psychiatry from 1985 to 1994 and directed The Julia Ann Singer Preschool Psychiatric Center.

Williams developed and provided guidance to the Cedars-Sinai Families of Divorce programs. He is past president of the American Society for Adolescent Psychiatry. For many years, his work has been in the area of child custody matters, which has included his writings on “The Prevention of Parentectomy”—a phrase and concept developed by and associated with him.

Williams’ contributions and invaluable service to the medical center and to the community will be greatly missed.

Weeklong Holiday of Sukkot Begins Sept. 23

A sukkah is shown from a previous celebration.

The Jewish Festival of Sukkot begins at sunset Sunday, Sept. 23, and lasts until dusk Monday, Oct. 1.

The holiday will bring the construction of a large bamboo hut on the Plaza Level Terrace by the end of the week. The hut is called a sukkah, a temporary shelter that serves as a hub for the weeklong celebration.

The holiday of Sukkot (pronounced soo-COAT) is based on a verse in Leviticus, which commands observant Jews to live in temporary shelters for seven days and seven nights. The ephemeral nature of the sukkah (SOO-kah) commemorates the 40 years during which the Israelites wandered the Sinai Desert after escaping from captivity in Egypt.

During the weeklong celebration, Jews eat and sometimes sleep in the sukkah. Each sukkah must have at least three walls and be large enough to dwell in. The roof must be made from materials that were grown in the ground, such as wood, thatch or bamboo, with the pieces spaced wide enough apart to see the stars.

The holiday ends with the festival Simchat Torah, where traditionally Jews dance in their synagogues with the Torah scrolls.

Cedars-Sinai Reverified as Level 1 Trauma Center

Cedars-Sinai was recently recertified as a Level 1 Trauma Center by the Verification Review Committee, an ad hoc group of the Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons (ACS).

And while the ACS does not designate trauma centers, it does confirm medical centers who provide the highest quality trauma care.

"This achievement recognizes our dedication to providing exceptional care for the most critically injured patients," said Heidi Hotz, RN, trauma program manager in the Department of Surgery.

Established by the ACS in 1987, the verification program recognizes medical centers who provide the entire spectrum of care for patients across the continuum of trauma care. Verified trauma centers must meet rigorous criteria and pass an on-site review.

"We are proud to receive this designation and honored to serve our community during their most critical time," said Hotz.

HbA1c Testing to be Updated Oct. 8

Special Testing within the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will update the reported reference intervals for HbA1c testing beginning Monday, Oct. 8.

Normal values are currently reported as 4 percent—6.0 percent. However, the department will be reporting further stratified reference intervals as recommended by the American Diabetes Association:

If you have questions, please contact Kimia Sobhani, PhD, at kimia.sobhani@cshs.org or Melissa Cervania at melissa.cervania@cshs.org.

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 77 people in August.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Annie Aivazian, RN

Farin Amersi, MD

Paula J. Anastasia, RN, MN, AOCN

Daniela Ando

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA

Eli M. Baron, MD

Reva K. Basho, MD

Brian M. Benway, MD

Neil A. Buchbinder, MD, FACC

Maria C. Carbajal

Timothy Charlton, MD

George Chaux, MD, FCCP

Morgan Check, NP

Maria Isabel Cisneros

Paul Cohart, MD

Mitchell E. Cohen, MD

Catherine M. Dang, MD, FACS

Danielle M. Derousseau

Noam Z. Drazin, MD

Ashkan Ehdaie, MD

Fardad Esmailian, MD

Ashley L. Ferguson

David M. Filsoof, MD

Phillip R. Fleshner, MD

Donna Gallik, MD, FACC

Olga Garcia

Ivor L. Geft, MD

Suzanne L. Geimer, RN

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Richard E. Gould, MD

Leland M. Green, MD

Kapil Gupta, MD, MPH, FASGE

Michele A. Hamilton, MD

Michael D. Harris, MD

Josefina M. Jagolino, RN

J. Patrick Johnson, MD

Saibal Kar, MD

Beth Y. Karlan, MD

Hyung L. Kim, MD

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Ravi S. Lakdawala, MD

Andrea S. Lever

Milton T. Little, MD

Kimberly A. Liwanag

Joanne Lutman, RN, OCN

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Harumi O. Mankarios, RN, OCN

Philomena McAndrew, MD

Catherine A. McDonough

Jennifer D. Mondoc, RN

Beth A. Moore, MD

Ariella A. Morrow, MD

Edward K. Nomoto, MD

Sara Oliva, RN, BSN, OCN

Alice F. Peng, MD

Inessa Rayzberg, RN

Ali Rezaie, MD, MSc, FRCPC

Robert M. Rose, MD

Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD

Howard L. Rosner, MD

Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD

Mina Sadeghi

Farzin Samadi, MD

Daniel Shouhed, MD

Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, FAAN

Robert J. Siegel, MD

Stuart L. Silverman, MD, FACP, FACR

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Eugene Y. Tsai, MD

Eric A. Vasiliauskas, MD

Marina Vaysburd, MD

Ronald G. Victor

Andrew S. Wachtel, MD, FCCP

Amy S. Weinberg, MD

Paola V. Werstler

Michael C. Yang, MD

Rachel Zabner, MD

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

CS-Link Tip: Practicing Inbasket Hygiene

Do you need to practice better Inbasket hygiene?

In CS-Link™, these tips can help keep it tidy and make it less likely you’ll miss important messages. Don’t be afraid to click "done." You can still find "done" work in the event that you need to see it again. Look at the bottom of the left panel, and find "completed work." You can easily find "done" messages.

Another tip is postponing a message. Say you want to call the patient in a week, after the pathology is back. You can postpone a message or a result. Right-click (or chose properties), then postpone.

Finally, you can also create reminders yourself by clicking the "remind me" button. Once in the remind me activity, click the tab labeled "options," and then pick a date that you want to see this message.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.