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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF July 12, 2019 | Archived Issues

Letter From Chief of Staff: Upcoming Required Remote Access Changes

By Clement C. Yang, MD, Chief of Staff

Last year, we began implementing Okta as our enterprise-wide 2-factor authentication system, starting with Microsoft O365 email. As cybersecurity threats continue to evolve, this change was necessary to protect Cedars-Sinai resources and confidential data. Over the next few months, we will continue to migrate existing Cedars-Sinai systems to Okta.

» Read more

Emergency Medicine Pioneer Marks 40 Years of Transformation, Growth

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In 1976, Joel Geiderman, MD, graduated from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and decided he would take a leap of faith and specialize in a new area of medicine: emergency medicine. Geiderman's choice was unique at the time. It wasn't until a historic vote in 1979 that the American Board of Medical Specialties officially established emergency medicine as a distinct area of patient care. Four decades later, Geiderman is co-chair of the Emergency Department and says his career path parallels the advances in emergency medicine.

» Read more

Physician Wellness Tip: Healthy Eating

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Whether you eat three or six meals a day, maintaining a healthy weight comes down to what you eat, how much you eat and how much energy you use. We gain weight when we eat more calories than we burn. So, it's really important to couple balanced meals with an active lifestyle.

» Read more

Deadline for Award Nominations Is Aug. 12

A call for nominations is now open for the Pioneer in Medicine and Master Clinician awards, which will be presented during the annual meeting of the medical staff on Oct. 14, 2019. All medical staff members are eligible to participate, with a panel selecting the winners. Please read more to review criteria and instructions before submitting your nominations.

» Read more

Eleven Startups Join Latest Accelerator Class

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The Cedars-Sinai Accelerator is welcoming 11 health-tech companies from across the U.S. and Europe to its newest accelerator class. The companies are innovating solutions for a wide variety of healthcare challenges—from the way hospitals count inventory and schedule staffers to products such as a smart brace for knee replacement patients.

» Read more

Lecture About 'Impossible Medical School' in Warsaw Ghetto Set for July 29

As death closed in on the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II, some of those coping amid the wretched conditions affirmed life in an extraordinary way: They operated a clandestine medical school. Leo A. Gordon, MD, a surgeon on the Cedars-Sinai staff for 40 years, is giving a lecture about the "Impossible Medical School" on Monday, July 29, in Harvey Morse Auditorium. 

» Read more

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

See production information updates for June.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Outside Results Box

CS-Link-logo-co.jpg

A world of perfect interoperability has not yet been realized. Results of procedures, imaging and labs still amass on our desks on paper. There are times when you need to mark these tests as done with a result immediately to satisfy Health Maintenance. Use the Outside Results Box, an extremely useful tool. Learn more here.

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Upcoming Required Remote Access Changes

Last year, we began implementing Okta as our enterprise-wide 2-factor authentication system starting, with Microsoft O365 email. As cybersecurity threats continue to evolve, this change was necessary to protect Cedars-Sinai resources and confidential data. Over the next few months, we will continue to migrate existing Cedars-Sinai systems to Okta.

What this means to you:

  • The login pages for affected applications will change. Please see a list of applications below.
  • You will be prompted for your universal login ID (your Cedars-Sinai email address) and password. If you are logging in from outside of our network, you will be also prompted for 2-factor authentication. If you are unsure of your universal login ID, contact the EIS Service Desk at 310-423-6428.
  • To help ensure a smooth 2-factor transition, we recommend you pre-register for your Okta 2FA registration.
  • Click here to pre-register for Okta (instructions included).
  • Registration should only take a few minutes.

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If you have questions or encounter problems with registration for access to migrated applications, call the EIS Helpdesk at 310-423-6428.

Emergency Medicine Pioneer Marks 40 Years of Transformation, Growth

Dr. Joel Geiderman

Joel Geiderman, MD, has worked in the emergency medicine since it was officially designated a specialty.

In 1976, Joel Geiderman, MD, graduated from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and decided he would take a leap of faith and specialize in a new area of medicine: emergency medicine.

Geiderman's choice was unique at the time. It wasn't until a historic vote in 1979 that the American Board of Medical Specialties officially established emergency medicine as a distinct area of patient care.

After his residency at Northwestern University Hospital, Geiderman joined Cedars-Sinai as a staff physician in what is now the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department. And today, 40 years later, Geiderman is co-chair of the department and says his career path parallels the advances in emergency medicine.

"As a discipline, the field of emergency medicine has become more sophisticated and patient needs have become far more complex," said Geiderman, also a professor of Emergency Medicine at Cedars-Sinai.

At the beginning of his career, emergency rooms commonly were staffed by doctors in training in other fields who called in specialists for most cases. "A lot of mistakes were made back then," he says. Today, specialists may be called to provide consultation, but emergency medicine specialists like Geiderman are trained and equipped to stabilize patients who have experienced trauma, a heart attack, a stroke, seizures or the sudden onset of other worrisome symptoms.

"When I began at Cedars-Sinai, our emergency department would see about 50-75 patients a day with eight doctors," Geiderman said. "Now, we see up to 300 patients each day and have a team of more than 40 doctors."

The team consists of emergency physicians, physician assistants', nurses, pharmacists and many other healthcare professionals who give immediate care to trauma and emergency patients. At least 15 paramedic squads deliver their patients to Cedars-Sinai.

Another notable change is that when Geiderman first joined the medical center, there were no full-body imaging techniques to rule out life-threatening diseases as well as other treatable conditions, like appendicitis or gallstones. And, for patients in need of emergency cardiac care for a heart attack, all physicians could do was admit the patient for observation, monitor their condition and take a wait-and-see approach.

Today, many cardiac patients treated at Cedars-Sinai benefit from advances like angioplasty, new medications and CT angiography that can help pinpoint the cause of heart disease.

"Fueled by Joel's passion, our team has grown not only in size, but in expertise," said Sam Torbati, MD, co-chair and medical director of the Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department. "He has an unwavering passion for providing exceptional patient care at a time when patients and their family members often are anxious and scared. We are tremendously fortunate to have benefited from Joel's leadership and guidance the last 40 years."

In fact, patients treated at Cedars-Sinai are on average much sicker than patients treated elsewhere in the nation, with 31% needing admission to an inpatient unit. Geiderman says that's in large part due to the specialty care offered, as well as the fact that the medical center is a Level 1 trauma centera nationally recognized leader in heart care and other specialties, a nationally recognized stroke center and offers services such as an on-site laboratory. "I could never have achieved what I have in my career without the tremendous support of my physician colleagues, the board and the Cedars-Sinai administrators," he adds. "It is the fulfillment of a dream."

The son of Holocaust survivors, Geiderman was appointed by U.S. President George W. Bush to serve as vice chair of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council from 2005 to 2010. Geiderman also completed the maximum eight-year term on the board of directors of the American Board of Emergency Medicine. He also has served as chair of the ethics committee for the 40,000-member American College of Emergency Physicians. Currently, he is medical director for the Beverly Hills Fire Department, providing quality oversight for paramedics as well as education and protocol guidance. He has four children along with his late wife, actress Roya Megnot Geiderman, who died of a brain tumor in 2009.

"Emergency medicine is a rewarding field, and it has been a remarkable experience to have been involved from the very beginning," said Geiderman. "And I feel even more fortunate to live in the same community in which I practice medicine. I know the patients who come through our doors as neighbors, friends, from my kids' schools, Cedars-Sinai employees, my synagogue and elsewhere in the community. It brings me great joy and pleasure to help them heal and restore."

Physician Wellness Tip: Healthy Eating

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Whether you eat three or six meals a day, maintaining a healthy weight comes down to what you eat, how much you eat and how much energy you use. We gain weight when we eat more calories than we burn. So, it's really important to couple balanced meals with an active lifestyle.

Everyone has different calorie needs in order to function. Avoiding extra pounds is just a matter of making sure your energy in (calories from food) equals your energy out (daily energy usage) over the long run. Once you learn your daily calorie needs, you can plan the right kind of diet and exercise to keep a healthy weight. If you are interested in learning about your basal metabolic rate (number of calories burned at rest over the course of one day), you might be interested in getting a free InBody composition analysis at Cedars-Sinai.

Deadline for Award Nominations Is Aug. 12

A call for nominations is now open for the Pioneer in Medicine and Master Clinician awards, which will be presented during the annual meeting of the medical staff on Oct. 14, 2019. All medical staff members are eligible to participate, with a panel selecting the winners.

The deadline for submissions is August 12, 2019. Please review the criteria and instructions below before submitting your nominations.

The Pioneer in Medicine Award

This award is given to a member of the medical staff who has made clinical and research contributions recognized at Cedars-Sinai and in the national or international medical communities. The criteria for candidates for the Pioneer in Medicine award are set forth in the Rules and Regulations of the Medical Staff, Article XXVI, Section 26.1(c) as follows:

  1. The candidate shall have made a major contribution to the medical center.
  2. The candidate shall be or have been involved in research.
  3. The candidate shall have been published in national or international peer-reviewed journals.
  4. The candidate shall be a teacher and a positive role model.
  5. The candidate shall be an innovator or have changed the medical world around him or her.
  6. The candidate shall have made clinical contributions recognized nationally.
  7. The candidate shall have been a physician at the medical center during a major part of his or her career.

Master Clinician Award (New)

The award is separate and distinct from the Pioneer in Medicine Award. The master clinician candidate shall have an outstanding reputation and clinical expertise. Additionally, the candidate shall have demonstrated a major impact on advancing healthcare at Cedars-Sinai and the community. The criteria for candidates for the master clinician award are set forth in the Rules and Regulations of the Medical Staff, Article XXV, as follows:

  1. The candidate shall have spent the majority of their career at Cedars-Sinai.
  2. The candidate shall be a renowned clinician with an established reputation and demonstrated expertise who has made a substantive contribution to patient care at Cedars-Sinai.
  3. The candidate shall have contributed clinical innovation that has improved patient care in a significant and systemic way at Cedars-Sinai.
  4. The candidate shall have demonstrated community activism and educational efforts that advanced healthcare and the wellbeing of the Cedars-Sinai community.
  5. The candidate shall have made contributions recognized at a national level by specialty societies or specialty boards.
  6. The candidate shall represent the paragon of collegiality who fosters collaboration to offer best possible patient care.
  7. The candidate shall have committee service at Cedars-Sinai.

Nominations

To submit a nomination for either award, please include a letter detailing your nominee's qualifications, key contributions and major accomplishments, as well as a copy of your nominee’s curriculum vitae. You can email these documents to monique.araya@cshs.org, or by mail to:

Monique Araya, MD
Vice Chief of Staff, Cedars-Sinai
8700 Beverly Blvd., Suite 2211
Los Angeles, CA 90048
Attention: Jenna Renella

For more information, contact jenna.renella@cshs.org.

 

Eleven Startups Join Latest Accelerator Class


The Cedars-Sinai Accelerator is welcoming 11 health-tech companies from across the U.S. and Europe to its newest accelerator class. The companies are innovating solutions for a wide variety of healthcare challenges—from the way hospitals count inventory and schedule staffers to products such as a smart brace for knee replacement patients.

"It's exciting to see our innovation community grow with each new class of companies, and these founders and their teams bring a remarkable breadth of backgrounds and experiences," said Anne Wellington, managing director of the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator. "I'm looking forward to seeing how our fifth class transforms care at Cedars-Sinai and beyond."

Teams from each company will spend three months in Los Angeles working closely with Cedars-Sinai mentors, including doctors, researchers and administrators. The Cedars-Sinai Innovation Space was designed to maximize interaction among the startup teams and is directly across the street from the medical center.

All the businesses accepted into the program receive a $100,000 investment from Cedars-Sinai. At the conclusion of the three-month program, CEOs will share their progress with an audience of investors, mentors, potential customers and members of the news media at Demo Day.

The new Cedars-Sinai Accelerator class includes:

AMPAworks—As a former surgical nurse practitioner, AMPAworks CEO Bianca Gonzalez is intimately familiar with the challenges of missing inventory and the time-consuming task of taking inventory. So Gonzalez and her partners—all MBAs from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania—developed a small cube that fits on any shelf and uses image recognition to count inventory as well as provide a real-time video feed of the count.

ClinicianNexus—This startup provides a platform that CEO Katrina Anderson describes as an "Airbnb for clinical rotations." The innovative platform allows health systems to assess and share their capacity to teach, filling in the who, what, when and where on the platform. The information is shared with the schools so that students can apply for rotations as efficiently as possible. ClinicianNexus is already working with 60 hospitals and 100 schools and has nearly 10,000 students signed up.

Feedtrail—Hospital leaders want and need to know what they did right, what they did wrong and what they could improve. But currently, administrators are limited to gathering that information via surveys conducted by mail or phone after a patient is discharged, making response rates low. Feedtrail offers a simple patient survey prior to discharge that takes mere seconds to complete. Feedtrail clients—36 healthcare providers in five countries—report they are receiving an increase in feedback as well as more actionable insights. Feedtrail co-founders are Paul Jaglowski, Mikko Lehmus, Chris Miller and Gert Volmer.

FocusMotion Health—Assessing and monitoring orthopaedic patients before and after surgery is at the center of FocusMotion Health. The company created a smart knee brace as well as an app and dashboard platform that capture how much a patient walks and exercises. It also measures a patient's range of motion and flexibility for 20 exercises and sends the data to the medical provider. The company's first product, the TKR Recovery System, is aimed at patients undergoing total knee replacement. The system connects physicians and therapists to the patient, enabling daily guidance and almost real-time intervention. Cavan Canavan and Grant Hughes founded the company.

Hawthorne Effect—Studies show that 89% of clinical trials are missing data and half of participating patients drop out before the study is completed. Hawthorne Effect has developed a virtual platform to track each patient's data. The company also trains investigators to visit patients in their homes to certify data and keep patients engaged. The data is then transferred via a secure database platform to the principal investigators. The result is lower patient withdrawals, more complete data collection and improved patient experience in clinical trials. Founded by Jodi Akin, Hawthorne Effect is in use at several U.S. medical centers.

Health Note—Simplifying the process of documenting every physician-patient interaction is the mission of Health Note. The company developed a simple-to-use platform that patients sign into before a physician appointment. The platform asks all the questions a physician would normally ask at the start of a visit. The information is formatted into a physician's note and sent to the medical record system. The company's co-founders, Joshua Reischer, MD, and Aaron Rau, attended the same entrepreneur class while they worked on developing different products. At the end of the course, they decided to combine forces and create Health Note.

Lantum—Scheduling shifts of doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals can be an exercise in confusion. That's why Melissa Morris, a native of the United Kingdom, founded Lantum after years of working as a healthcare consultant with McKinsey & Company. Currently, filling hospital shifts involves multiple phone calls, emails and spreadsheets. With the Lantum workforce-management platform, hospitals can easily schedule their staff. Staff also can log in to the platform to book and swap shifts, negotiate rates and complete time sheets. Lantum also can arrange for next-day payments. Lantum is already in use with 2,000 healthcare organizations and 20,000 healthcare professionals in the U.K.

Notisphere—Healthcare providers can get bogged down with product recalls and efforts to prevent patients from being harmed by a recalled item. To communicate recalls, the healthcare industry currently uses a mostly paper-based, slow and cumbersome process. Official recall notices can come with dozens of pages of instructions and are sent to numerous personnel at the same hospital. Notisphere is a digital platform that allows suppliers to announce recalls and also provides real-time communications between product suppliers and healthcare providers. Notisphere was created by Guillermo Ramas who has 20 years of experience in healthcare technology.

OMNY—Data sharing, particularly about pharmaceutical usage, is at the heart of any healthcare system. An example that co-founder and CEO Mitesh Rao, MD, cites is the tracking of high-cost oncology drugs. Without centralized data, hospital teams struggle to know exactly where drugs are located or when they are utilized. The OMNY platform facilitates real-time sharing of this data. Sharing allows hospitals to better align the supply of a drug with the demand for it, significantly reducing cost and waste. Rao, formerly the chief patient safety officer at Stanford, co-founded OMNY with Sunny Grewal (Helix, Outset) and Sean O'Brien (Virtustream, Dell EMC). OMNY's partnerships include big pharma, biotech and hospital systems.

Parker Isaac Instruments—Dissecting specimens can be a tedious manual process. Instead of pathologists manually dissecting cancer resections to isolate lymph nodes, Parker Isaac Instruments has created a tissue-separation instrument which automatically isolates lymph nodes from the surrounding fat, resulting in higher lymph node yields. Once separated, the nodes are studied under a microscope to detect the spread of cancer. The instrument was piloted in a community hospital in upstate New York and is currently being tested in the Cedars-Sinai Pathology Lab. Co-founders Alex Bodell and Charles Stern were inspired by Charles' mother, a pathologist, as well as a shared passion for mechanical design.

Virti—Believing that experiential education should be affordable to everyone in healthcare inspired orthopaedic and trauma surgeon Alex Young, MB, ChB, to start his company. Virti employs virtual and augmented reality coupled with artificial intelligence to transport physicians and students into difficult clinical environments. For example, Virti can virtually place physicians in stressful environments like an emergency department dealing with a traumatic event. Following the experience, Virti then assesses participants to help improve their performance. It also helps reduce patient anxiety by creating virtual hospital experiences for patients, taking them on the journey from the parking garage to the operating room. Virti is currently in use in medical and nursing schools as well as healthcare simulation centers in the U.S. and U.K.

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The fifth class of entrepreneurs in the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator, with Managing Director Anne Wellington on the left of the second row, wearing a light blue jacket. Photo by Cedars-Sinai.

Lecture About 'Impossible Medical School' in Warsaw Ghetto Set for July 29

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Poland held special ceremonies in 2018 to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the uprising in the Warsaw Ghetto. (Photo by Getty Images)

As death closed in on the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II, some of those coping amid the wretched conditions affirmed life in an extraordinary way: They operated a clandestine medical school. Leo A. Gordon, MD, a surgeon on the Cedars-Sinai staff for 40 years, will hold a special Grand Rounds lecture about the "Impossible Medical School" on Monday, July 29, in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

The lecture, which begins at noon, will cover the remarkable tale of medical education conducted under the most challenging and grim conditions. The presentation is sponsored by the Department of Surgery, the Institute for Healthcare Ethics, the Program in the History of Medicine, and the Day of Remembrance Committee and Advancement. 

All are welcome to attend. Lunch will be served, and one hour of Continuing Medical Education will be awarded.

The Impossible Medical School (PDF)  

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Product Updates

Product information updates for June from Pharmacy and Therapeutics are summarized in the PDF link below.

P and T Approvals - June 2019 (PDF)  

CS-Link Tip: Outside Results Box

A world of perfect interoperability has not yet been realized. Results of procedures, imaging and labs still amass on our desks on paper. As appropriate, these are scanned into CS-Link™.  There are times when you need to mark these tests as done with a result immediately to satisfy Health Maintenance.

Use the Outside Results Box, an extremely useful tool. Learn more here.

Speaking of Health Maintenance, there were some changes in April. You can still change the frequency, and there's a new button called “Edit Frequency.” To learn more about this and other changes, review Health Maintenance updates.

To learn more, attend a CS-Link Efficiency and Review for Physician meeting on the second Thursday of each month. The classes, which begin at 7:30 a.m., are held in PEC 4.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.