Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF June 28, 2019 | Archived Issues

Physician Wellness Tip: A Healthy Living Message

Health affects everything. Your quality of life. Your emotional and mental well-being. Your relationships, work and finances. Even what you do for fun. So, don't take your health for granted. Spread a healthy living message to everyone you know. It's not hard to do. You can ride your bike, take the stairs, go on vacation and not answer work emails, start a community garden, plan a group outing or start a book club.

» Read more

Visiting Doctor Fights for Health and Human Dignity

As a doctor practicing medicine in the war-torn eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, James Kaliri, MD, has seen almost unimaginable horrors. His hospital is known for being on the front lines of treating women subjected to sexual violence and a source of expertise for its entire region. Kaliri, who recently completed a four-week visitorship at Cedars-Sinai, embodies an ethic important to healthcare professionals everywhere: respect for human dignity.

» Read more

President's Perspective: What Is a Jewish Hospital?

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

The Star of David prominently located on the top of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center makes it clear to everyone that Cedars-Sinai is a Jewish hospital. But what that means, especially in a diverse region like Los Angeles in 2019, is not equally well understood. 

» Read more

Cancer Survivors Celebrate Strength, Self-Care

Patients shared their stories of struggle and triumph at the 33rd Annual Cancer Survivors Day Luncheon, which was held earlier this month at the Skirball Cultural Center. Said Cyndi Tomlinson, a cancer survivor: "In life you grow up and you try to figure out what's important, who's important, how to set boundaries for yourself—and I think when you're faced with a life-or-death kind of situation, those things really come clear quickly."

» Read more

Gift Will Advance Research for Memory Disorders

Melinda Goldrich and Andrea Goldrich Cayton have donated $10 million in honor of their late father, Holocaust survivor and prominent Los Angeles real estate developer Jona Goldrich. The gift will establish the Jona Goldrich Center for Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders. The center, to be established within the Department of Neurology, will recruit physician-scientists to develop new patient-care therapies that address the challenges of the rapidly growing population of patients with Alzheimer's disease and other memory disorders.

» Read more

Copeptin Will Replace ADH Starting July 15

Beginning Monday, July 15, ADH (anti-diuretic hormone) will no longer be orderable on CS-Link™ and ADH will be replaced by Copeptin. Copeptin test code is COPEPQ. Copeptin is a peptide derived from the pre-pro-hormone of ADH—also known as arginine vasopressin (AVP).

» Read more

Simple Ways to Help Conserve Electricity This Summer

With the hottest summer months just ahead, employees are encouraged to help conserve electricity by following several simple guidelines. These easy-to-follow steps will enable Cedars-Sinai to not only reduce costs, but also protect the environment. For instance, turn off computers, fax machines, printers and copiers before leaving for home. These devices use power when plugged into power sockets and their lights are on or they're warming up.

» Read more

Work and Life Matters Expanding Services

Cedars-Sinai's employee assistance program, Work and Life Matters, will expand starting Monday, July 1. Work and Life Matters will broaden its services through a partnership with Empathia Life Matters. The expansion will mean that employees can call anytime—24 hours a day, seven days a week—to request assistance or referrals. The phone number is 866-713-1979.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 193 people in May. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and special musical guests Nile Rodgers and CHIC. The event on Wednesday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $145 per adult and $75 per child, 3-11 years of age.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Reconciling Outside Information

Los Angeles is a big place. While Cedars-Sinai is certainly one of the best places to seek healthcare, it is not the only place. Our patients often have medications prescribed elsewhere. An accurate medical list and problem list are crucial to providing the best care possible. CS-Link™ can help.

» Read more

Physician Wellness Tip: A Healthy Living Message

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Health affects everything. Your quality of life. Your emotional and mental well-being. Your relationships, work and finances. Even what you do for fun.

So, don't take your health for granted. Spread a healthy living message to everyone you know. It's not hard to do. You can ride your bike, take the stairs, go on vacation and not answer work emails, start a community garden, plan a group outing or start a book club.

Good health is contagious, and little choices can make a big impact. So, start leaning into your authentic self and others will notice.

Visiting Doctor Fights for Health and Human Dignity

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James Kaliri, MD, a physician practicing medicine in the Democratic Republic of Congo, recently completed a four-week visitorship at Cedars-Sinai.

As a doctor practicing medicine in the war-torn eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, James Kaliri, MD, has seen almost unimaginable horrors.

His hospital is known for being on the front lines of treating women subjected to sexual violence and a source of expertise for its entire region. Yet Kaliri and his colleagues are often without the latest medical technology in many disciplines needed for comprehensive care.

Still, Kaliri, who recently completed a four-week visitorship at Cedars-Sinai, embodies an ethic important to healthcare professionals everywhere: respect for human dignity.

Kaliri emphasizes that principle in his work as a general practioner at the Panzi Hospital, whose founder, Denis Mukwege, won the Nobel Peace Prize last year. Mukwege, a gynecologist, and the hospital are acclaimed for caring for thousands of women harmed by mass rape and other sexual violence amid warfare that has persisted since before the hospital opened in 1999.

In his advocacy work, Mukwege, ignoring threats to his life, has criticized the Congolese government for acts of sexual violence by its troops. In a 2012 address at the United Nations, he rebuked Congo and other nations for failing to stop "an unjust war that has used violence against women and rape as a strategy of war."

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Jeffrey A. Smith, MD, JD, MMM, became friends with Kaliri after visiting Panzi Hospital in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Mukwege's original aim in founding the hospital, Kaliri explained, was to reduce Congo's high maternal death rate. But the hospital, he said, was soon swamped by women injured and traumatized by sexual violence.

Kaliri, who grew up in a poor neighborhood near Panzi Hospital and who for three years has been in charge of its emergency service and outpatient care, praises his mentor.

"He taught me about the value of a human being, the respect for human dignity," said Kaliri, who speaks Swahili, French and English, as well as two local languages used in Congo. "This is the biggest thing I learned from Dr. Mukwege."

Kaliri's stay at Cedars-Sinai was intended as preparation for him to study cardiology, a specialization desperately needed in his country. Kaliri, 34, is looking into getting that additional education in another African nation with more expertise in the field, possibly Egypt, Niger or Togo.

The chief operating officer of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Jeffrey A. Smith, MD, JD, MMM, became friends with Kaliri while making two visits to the Panzi Hospital over the last two years. Smith is covering the cost for Kaliri's stay at Cedars-Sinai as well as for his upcoming cardiology training, along with the education of two other Panzi Hospital doctors seeking to specialize.

Smith said he was inspired by the work of Kaliri and his Nobel laureate mentor. Witnessing "the great work that they're doing, it was just a calling for me," Smith said.

Kaliri "talks about how technology isn't everything," but instead emphasizes "how you treat the patient." That holistic model of care, Smith added, "is important not just to victims of sexual violence but to all of our patients."

At Cedars-Sinai, Kaliri has observed medical care in the general internal medicine area and the emergency room. He said he was impressed by the treatment protocols stemming from evidence-based medicine. That sharply differs from most protocols in Congo, where in the absence of local medical research, doctors often rely on what Kaliri said are out-of-date protocols or old medical reference books.

Smith described the community of Bukavu, where Panzi Hospital is located, as an area whose population has soared to almost 1 million as people have flocked there from the countryside because of the warfare. "People are living in very difficult conditions, overcrowded conditions, with intermittent electricity and oftentimes no running water," he said.

The 450-bed hospital itself, Smith said, often has patients "sharing beds in big, open wards," although officials avoid doubling up the 200 beds devoted to victims of sexual violence.

In a presentation to medical staff and students at Cedars-Sinai, Kaliri cited how the hospital and its affiliated foundation have broadened their services to include psychological counseling, legal assistance and job training. He said the aim is to help sexual violence survivors make a successful return to society and to restore their sense of dignity. He said the hospital also is training rural healthcare workers—some of whom previously operated on women without anesthetics when the drugs were out of stock—to improve patient care in his country's remote areas.

Kaliri was unsparing in his description of the suffering endured by some of his hospital's patients and provided horrifying statistics. For example, the hospital from September 1999 through August 2018 treated 54,471 sexual violence survivors. Separate statistics tracking most of that period showed that 3% to 6% of the sexual violence survivors were children under 10 years old.

Some of the women attacked, Kaliri said, have been violated with guns and knives. "Just by looking at the injuries, you are shocked," he said.

"When you see what these people are doing to these young girls," Kaliri added later, "you hardly believe it is possible."

President's Perspective: What Is a Jewish Hospital?

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

What Is a Jewish Hospital?

The Star of David prominently located on the top of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center makes it clear to everyone that Cedars-Sinai is a Jewish hospital. But what that means, especially in a diverse region like Los Angeles in 2019, is not equally well understood. 

If you look closely, you will see hallmarks of Cedars-Sinai's Jewish roots around the medical center. We maintain a kosher kitchen, for example, to meet the needs of religiously observant patients, and operate Sabbath elevators that stop on each floor. We also affix mezuzahs (small boxes containing parchment scrolls) to the sides of doorways.

The Jewish values that underlie these things established Cedars-Sinai and remain essential to our mission, our shared identity and our role serving all of our patients and community.

Like many Jewish hospitals in America, our founding in 1902 (as Kaspare Cohn Hospital in Angelino Heights) came in response to discrimination and exclusion: Jewish patients often were unable to obtain equitable care in most existing hospitals of the time, and Jewish physicians often were banned from joining the medical staffs of those hospitals. 

As a Jewish hospital, Kaspare Cohn embodied a core value of welcoming and treating all people with dignity and respect, especially anyone who felt excluded or victimized. This core Judaic value remains visible and deeply embedded in the very fabric of today’s Cedars-Sinai, as evidenced by the diversity of people and communities we care for, the diversity of our employees and our wide-ranging community benefit contributions that support those in need across the Los Angeles region. This is something I immediately identified with, as a non-Jew, when I first came to Cedars-Sinai 40 years ago.

As a Jewish hospital, Cedars-Sinai welcomes and embraces all backgrounds and faiths and works hard to enable everyone to practice their faith in their own way, including those who are secular or spiritual but not religious. This is why we offer many different types of prayer services in our chapel each week ranging from Catholic Mass to Muslim Jumu’ah prayers, and why our hospital chaplain staff represent Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, Armenian Orthodox, Unitarian Universalist and many other religious traditions. 

This respect for diversity and pluralism extends to many other types of diversity: cultural, gender, social and economic, to name just a few. While this value is not uniquely Jewish, it is certainly a central component of Judaism and the history of our institution. 

One of Cedars-Sinai’s greatest strengths is our shared values, guiding not only what we do, but how we do it. In a rapidly changing world, it is important to stay connected to these longstanding touchstones, the proud result of our institution’s Jewish heritage.

 

Cancer Survivors Celebrate Strength, Self-Care

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Gregory Pearly, left, and Tamara Darweesh, celebrate at Cancer Survivors Day. 

To survive during his struggle against an aggressive form of prostate cancer, Bin McLaurin didn't only have to overcome the disease attacking his body. He said he also had to toss out his long-held image of masculinity.

For years, even after he came to work for Cedars-Sinai in 2011, McLaurin accepted the notion that real men didn't go to the doctor unless it was a clearcut emergency. He finally relented after moving into a research assistant job at the Smidt Heart Institute. As McLaurin, 51, explained, he felt hypocritical about encouraging people to take care of their health while he hadn't gone for a physical in years.

Then, after getting a checkup, McLaurin's doctor spotted a problem that eventually led to his cancer diagnosis five years ago. The discovery spurred a personal journey that, among other things, changed his views on manhood and life in general. "To really find a way to survive, or a way to be resilient in the face of a severe, traumatic diagnosis like cancer, you have to learn to step out of your comfort zone," McLaurin said.

The need to stretch personally to deal with tough medical circumstances was highlighted at the 33rd Annual Cancer Survivors Day Luncheon at the Skirball Cultural Center. McLaurin and fellow guest speaker and cancer survivor Cyndi Tomlinson, 48, shared stories at the Cedars-Sinai event of how they fought their illnesses and channeled much of their energy into helping others being treated for cancer. 

Their approach squares with increasing research on the qualities patients need to fight cancer. "Attitude is huge," said Arash Asher, MD, director of Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship at Cedars-Sinai.

"Our patients have taught us that it is possible to experience gratitude," Asher said, even while suffering from cancer. He pointed to "feeling grateful for having access to the care that they have or the people that they have in their life, or for the opportunity to learn something that they may not have had a chance to learn otherwise, or for maybe even reprioritizing values."

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Patient Bin McLaurin shares his cancer journey.

That describes Tomlinson's outlook—even though she has coped with one cancer fight after another involving herself or loved ones. At age 6, she lost her father to throat cancer. At age 22, she was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Three years ago to the month, she learned she had stage 0 breast cancer. And two months after that, her husband, Bert Ramirez, found out he had stage 4 follicular lymphoma. "What are the odds of that?!" she exclaimed, before an audience that included about 320 cancer survivors and their guests at the Skirball.

Today, Tomlinson said, both she and her husband are cancer-free. She said during her battle with disease, "the superficial things really got swept away."

"In life you grow up and you try to figure out what's important, who's important, how to set boundaries for yourself—and I think when you're faced with a life-or-death kind of situation, those things really come clear quickly."

Now Tomlinson is focusing on other cancer patients and their families and caretakers. By day, she works as the Southern California regional manager of an optical store chain. But every minute she has free after work, Tomlinson said, she devotes to her role as executive director of Bolster & Bridge, a nonprofit that provides yoga therapy, mindfulness meditation and other practices.

For McLaurin, who in April celebrated a year of being cancer-free, a key early step toward recovery was accepting the advice of a Cedars-Sinai social worker who recommended trying an art therapy program. After a few classes, McLaurin said, he learned to express his feelings about the disease and its effects, which included temporary erectile dysfunction, incontinence and self-image issues. It gave him a sense of relief that helped him fight on.

"Not everybody is skilled in knowing how to care for themselves when it comes to cancer. But, sometimes as guys, we're tripped up even more because we don't share our emotions, or we're not sharing our feelings," McLaurin said.

McLaurin's new outlook led him to his current job as a coordinator of cancer survivorship programs at Cedars-Sinai. "That's the real beauty of this story. Not only am I cancer-free, but I now get to help other cancer survivors rebuild their lives."

He launched a men's cancer breakfast club and a men's health and cancer support foundation called Men Actively Creating Healthy Outcomes, or MACHO.

The reason for that name for his foundation? "Macho is not just being able to lift heavy weights and run the fastest on the track or having the fattest paycheck of all your male friends—the kind of posturing things that we do as guys to prove how strong we are. True strength, for me, true macho, is how well you take care of yourself."

Gift Will Advance Research for Memory Disorders

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Melinda Goldrich (standing, far left) and Andrea Goldrich Cayton (standing, second from left) have donated $10 million in honor of their late father, Jona Goldrich (seated, center), to establish the Jona Goldrich Center for Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders. Photo courtesy of the Goldrich family.

Melinda Goldrich and Andrea Goldrich Cayton have donated $10 million in honor of their late father, Holocaust survivor and prominent Los Angeles real estate developer Jona Goldrich. The gift will establish the Jona Goldrich Center for Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders.

The center, to be established within the Department of Neurology, will recruit physician-scientists to develop new patient-care therapies that address the challenges of the rapidly growing population of patients with Alzheimer's disease and other memory disorders. The Goldrich family has committed to giving an additional $5 million in matching donations, potentially doubling the funds for the center to $20 million.

"This generous and transformative gift from the Goldrich family is an enduring testament to Jona's life," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO. "The Jona Goldrich Center for Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders will position Cedars-Sinai as a leader in the Los Angeles community and beyond in treating the devastating effects of Alzheimer's and other memory disorders."

Alzheimer's is the leading cause of dementia, which is characterized by loss of memory and decline in cognitive function. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is projected to triple to nearly 14 million by 2060.

"The new center will provide new therapies, clinical trials and care options to patients with Alzheimer's disease," said Nancy Sicotte, MD, chair of the Department of Neurology and the Women's Guild Distinguished Chair in Neurology.

The family was inspired to make the gift by a desire to make a difference in the fight against the debilitating effects Alzheimer's disease inflicts on patients and their families.

"We want families to have options for the treatment and prevention of the devasting symptoms of Alzheimer's and memory disorders," said Melinda Goldrich.

"Honoring our father's memory by establishing the Jona Goldrich Center for Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders is our commitment to eradicating these diseases," said Andrea Goldrich Cayton.

Jona Goldrich was born in Poland in 1927. He and his brother Avram escaped Nazi-occupied territory and moved to Palestine in 1942. Goldrich completed his education and fought in the 1948 war that created the state of Israel. In 1954, Goldrich immigrated to the U.S. and started a construction cleanup business. His acumen led him to early success, giving him the opportunity to build his first apartment building in North Hollywood just two years later. Goldrich went on to build a national real estate empire centered in Los Angeles.

Goldrich was active as a Jewish philanthropic leader in the Los Angeles community. In 1987, he created the Goldrich Family Foundation to continue efforts to cure diseases, support schools and universities, promote social justice, and further Holocaust awareness and remembrance.

Melinda and Andrea, through their family foundation, have made their gift to the Department of Neurology as a legacy to their beloved father. The entire family—wife Doretta, son-in-law Barry Cayton, and grandchildren Garrett, Lindsay and Derek Cayton—proudly embrace Goldrich's philanthropic mission.

 

 

Copeptin Will Replace ADH Starting July 15

Beginning Monday, July 15, ADH (anti-diuretic hormone) will no longer be orderable on CS-Link™ and ADH will be replaced by Copeptin. Copeptin test code is COPEPQ.

Copeptin is a peptide derived from the pre-pro-hormone of ADH—also known as arginine vasopressin (AVP). Copeptin can be used as a near ideal surrogate marker for ADH (a.k.a AVP) because it has a much longer half-life, is easier to measure immunologically and is closely correlated to the pathways in which ADH is involved. Hence, many labs are replacing ADH testing with Copeptin.

If you have questions, contact Kimia Sobhani, PhD, at kimia.sobhani@cshs.org.

Simple Ways to Help Conserve Electricity This Summer

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With the hottest summer months just ahead, employees are encouraged to help conserve electricity by following several simple guidelines.

These easy-to-follow steps will enable Cedars-Sinai to not only reduce costs, but also protect the environment. Please follow the guidelines below, particularly in offices or other nonclinical areas:

  • When able to do so, close window blinds to keep the heat out and the cool in.
  • Close doors when exiting buildings, reducing unnecessary electrical costs in air conditioning.
  • Turn off computers, fax machines, printers and copiers before leaving for home. Devices use power when plugged into power sockets and their lights are on or they're warming up.
  • Unplug laptop cords, cellphone chargers and similar equipment when not in use. They will consume power even if no device is attached.
  • Switch off workspace lights, fans and other electrical items when not needed, particularly when leaving for the day or night, and on weekends.

 

Work and Life Matters Expanding Services

Cedars-Sinai's employee assistance program, Work and Life Matters, will expand starting Monday, July 1.

The intent is to provide better ways for employees throughout the organization to handle stress and to achieve work/life balance—needs identified in Cedars-Sinai’s annual Engagement Surveys.

Work and Life Matters will broaden its services through a partnership with Empathia Life Matters. The expansion will mean that employees can call anytime—24 hours a day, seven days a week—to request assistance or referrals.

The phone number is 866-713-1979.

The partnership allows employees and their household members to receive services on the Cedars-Sinai campus or off-site through affiliate providers. Non-employee physicians who contract with Cedars-Sinai also are eligible for the services.

Assistance will be provided by mental health professionals including licensed clinical social workers, licensed professional clinical counselors, marriage and family therapists and master's-level staffers.

Employees are allowed eight sessions with professional counselors at no cost. Sessions may be in person, via the web or by telephone, and the services are voluntary and strictly confidential.

Although many of the offerings are free, there may be charges when referrals are made to services outside of the partnership.

The services offered in the partnership cover areas including:

  • Workplace concerns
  • Management consultations (advice for managers dealing with difficult personnel or other work issues)
  • Relationship, marital and family issues
  • Emotional and psychological support issues
  • Critical incident stress management
  • Workplace violence and/or harassment
  • Bereavement support
  • Problems with addiction
  • Pre-retirement coaching
  • Coaching to reduce stress

Through Empathia, referrals will be made for financial, legal, child care and elder care assistance.

 

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

The Circle of Friends program honored 193 people in May. 

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgment.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Rachel Abuav, MD

Jamil Ahmed, CP

Michael J. Alexander, MD, FACS

Nabilah A. Ali, PA-C

Daniel C. Allison, MD, MBA, FACS

Jon Victor Altamira

Neel Anand, MD

Adrian D. Ang, RN

Monique F. Araya, MD

Mark J. Ault, MD

Babak Azarbal, MD

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA

Anca M. Barbu, MD

Brandon R. Benavidez, RN

Irene Breceda

Earl W. Brien, MD

Neil A. Buchbinder, MD, FACC

Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD

Miguel A. Burch, MD

Michael L. Chaikin, MD, FACC

Dorrie E. Chang, MD

Kirk Y. Chang, MD

Jennifer P. Chaparro

George E. Chaux, MD, FCCP

Aaron Chiang, MD

Alice P. Chung, MD, FACS

Susan B. Clark, RN

Yvonne M. Concepcion, RN

Stephen R. Corday, MD

M. Alicia Curiel, CP

Jennifer L. Cutler, MD

Catherine M. Dang, MD, FACS

Robert M. Davidson, MD, FACP, FACC, FAHA

Dino T. DeConcini, MD

Maria L. Delioukina, MD

Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD

Stephen C. Deutsch, MD, FACP

Suhail Dohad, MD

Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD

Yaron Elad, MD

Fardad Esmailian, MD

Richard Essner, MD, FACS

Ren Felipe

Robert A. Figlin, MD, FACP

David M. Filsoof, MD

Christopher R. Fitzgerald, MD

Lindsy J. Forbess, MD, M.Sc.

Charles A. Forscher, MD

Alex Foxman, MD, FACP

Charles J. Frankel, MD

Sandra Fraser, RN

Larry Froch, MD

Zonia Gaeta

Larisa Gallo, PA

Eli S. Gang, MD

Maria Garcia

Suzanne Gilberg Lenz, MD

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Neil J. Goldberg, MD

Avivah N. Golian, MD

Joshua R. Gonzalez, MD

Nestor R. Gonzalez, MD

Leo A. Gordon, MD, FACS

Stephen L. Graham, MD

Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD

Henry Granstrand, RN

Violette G. Gray, MD

Navyash Gupta, MD

Solomon I. Hamburg, MD, PhD

Omid Hamid, MD

Michele A. Hamilton, MD

Michael D. Harris, MD

Theresa C. Henderson, MD

Andrew E. Hendifar, MD, MPH

Emmanuel E. Hernandez

Solange D. Hildreth

Allen S. Ho, MD

David M. Hoffman, MD

Jethro L. Hu, MD

Gabriel E. Hunt, Jr., MD

Leonel A. Hunt, MD

Eduvijes Ibarra

Griselda Islas, RN

Calvin Johnson, MD

J. Patrick Johnson, MD

Marisa L. Johnson

Sheila M. Kahwaty, PA-C/MPAS

Marwa Kaisey, MD

Kamran Kalpari, MD

Beth Y. Karlan, MD

Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD

Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH, FACC, FASE

Raj M. Khandwalla, MD

Chae Y. Kim, MD

Hyung L. Kim, MD

Sang D. Kim, MD, MS

Jason B. Kirk, MD

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Evan P. Kransdorf, MD, PhD

Shani E. Labrado, RN

Spencer K. Lass McAndrews, PA-C

Gary E. Leach, MD

John E. Lee, MS, LCGC

Susie K. Lee, RN, MSN, FNP

Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN

Jeffrey R. Lewis, MD

Eric J. Ley, MD

Andrew J. Li, MD

Carol A. Lin, MD

Vivian Lin, MD

Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP

Darlene S. Lopez

Shalini Mahajan, MD

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Jon Mallen-St. Clair, MD, PhD

William J. Mandel, MD

Malcolm L. Margolin, MD

Philomena F. McAndrew, MD

Leslie D. Memsic, MD, FACS

Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc

Joel D. Mittleman, MD

Charles N. Moon, MD

Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD, FACC

Ariella A. Morrow, MD

Graham J. Mouw, MD

Hattie M. Munn

Stephanie Munoz, RN

Dan I. Naim, MD

Mamoo Nakamura, MD

Ronald B. Natale, MD

Nicholas N. Nissen, MD

Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD

Christopher P. Owens

Ronald L. Paquette, MD

Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD

Alice F. Peng, MD

Anne L. Peters, MD

Valerie J. Petty

Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS

Mark Pimentel, MD, FRCP(C)

Lawrence D. Piro, MD

Elinor Pullen, PA-C

Robyn D. Putman

Florian Rader, MD, M.Sc.

David S. Ramin, MD

Noena Z. Ramirez

Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FACC

Jon C. Rasak, MD

Alexandre Rasouli, MD

Chrystal M. Reed, MD, PhD

Sogol M. Rezvanpour

Bobbie J. Rimel, MD

Sonja L. Rosen, MD

Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD

Virginia Russell, MD

Amy S. Rutman, MD

Vivian L. Salle, RN

Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS

Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC

Daniel F. Schibler, MD

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Ernst R. Schwarz, MD, PhD

Prediman K. Shah, MD

William Shamoun

Michael D. Share, MD

Stephen L. Shiao, MD, PhD

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS

R. Kendrick Slate, MD

Enrique Slodownik, MD

Igor Spanic, CEP, MS

Jon Mallen St. Clair, MD, PhD

Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS

Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA

Leslie M. Stricke, MD, FCCP

Charles D. Swerdlow, MD

Steven N. Sykes, MD

Steven W. Tabak, MD

Stephan R. Targan, MD

David B. Thordarson, MD

Tommy H. Tomizawa, MD, MPH

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Eric A. Vasiliauskas, MD

Jheri L. Velazquez

Angela W. Velleca, RN, BSN, CCTC

Robert A. Vescio, MD

Robert G. Ward

Alan W. Weinberger, MD

Alexandra M. Wierzbicki, RN, BSN, CN

Pamela Wilridge, CP

Edward M. Wolin, MD

Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC

David A. Ziring, MD

Zachary S. Zumsteg, MD

Summer Is Coming, and So Are Fireworks

Hollywood Bowl at Night

Hollywood Bowl Fireworks

Celebrate Independence Day at the Hollywood Bowl with fireworks and music by the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and special musical guests Nile Rodgers and CHIC. The event on Wednesday, July 3, is open to Cedars-Sinai physicians and their immediate family members. Cost is $145 per adult and $75 per child, 3-11 years of age.

Parking passes also are available.

To reserve a place, contact Cheryl Verne at 310-423-2681 or cheryl.verne@cshs.org.

CS-Link Tip: Reconciling Outside Information

Los Angeles is a big place. While Cedars-Sinai is certainly one of the best places to seek healthcare, it is not the only place. Our patients often have medications prescribed elsewhere. An accurate medical list and problem list are crucial to providing the best care possible.

In CS-Link™, you can reconcile available outside information. You will see a prompt by the medication, allergy and problem list that will enable you to reconcile outside information. Once you click this, you have the option to add to the list in CS-link™, to discard, or to ignore the medications, allergies and problems.

For more information, watch this short video.  

To learn more, attend a CS-Link Efficiency and Review for Physician meeting on the second Thursday of each month. The classes, which begin at 7:30 a.m., are held in PEC 4.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.