Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

A BI-WEEKLY PUBLICATION FROM THE CEDARS-SINAI CHIEF OF STAFF October 4, 2019 | Archived Issues

A New Mark for the Future of Our Institution

Today, Cedars-Sinai is introducing a new logo! This new logo honors our legacy, while establishing a more approachable, legible and modern visual identity that reflects our commitment to be an accessible institution. This is the first significant update to our logo in nearly 60 years. 

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Invitation to the Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff

By Clement C. Yang, MD, Chief of Staff

The annual meeting of the medical staff is approaching—Monday, October 14—and I hope you can join us in Harvey Morse Auditorium at 11:30 a.m. for a complimentary lunch, industry insights and recognition of the outstanding work performed this year.

» Read more

Physicians and Nurses Encouraged to Attend Free Wellness Course Oct. 18

Physicians and nurses are encouraged to attend a free one-day wellness course on Friday, Oct. 18, to examine the importance of wellness and provide recommendations, tools and resources that healthcare professionals can utilize to develop resiliency, work-life balance and self-care.

» Read more

Parking Rate Changes Coming in November

We surveyed the current parking rates for patients, visitors, employees and faculty physicians at our lots and garages. After a thorough analysis, we will be adjusting parking rates in November for all full-time, part-time and per-diem Cedars-Sinai Medical Center employees, independent contractors and faculty physicians who pay for parking. 

» Read more

Physician Wellness Tip: Deciding How Much to Eat

Deciding what to put on your plate at meal time can be hard. You want to eat healthy, but you also want to feel satisfied. The good news is that you don't have to figure out nutritional value versus calories on your own. Forget the old food pyramid. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has a new online tool called MyPlate.

» Read more

High Holidays Services Set for Oct. 8-9

Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department, will conduct services for the High Holidays at Cedars-Sinai. The services also will feature cantor Jordan Gorfinkel. The services will be available for viewing on Channel 50 of the inpatient TV system. 

» Read more

Holiday of Sukkot Begins Sunday, Oct. 13

The Jewish Festival of Sukkot begins at sunset Sunday, Oct. 13, and lasts until dusk Monday, Oct. 21. The holiday will bring the construction of a large bamboo hut—called a sukkah—on the Plaza Level Terrace. The sukkah is a temporary shelter that serves as a hub of the weeklong celebration.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Earns Top Score on Hospital Equality Index

Cedars-Sinai achieved a score of 100 on the 2019 Human Rights Campaign Healthcare Equality Index. The score confers on the health center a "Leader in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality" designation. The Healthcare Equality Index is an annual survey that evaluates medical centers' policies and practices that focus on equitable and inclusive care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer patients and their families. 

» Read more

One Kidney and 37 Years of Marriage

After 37 years of marriage, William M. (Bill) Paparian still sings the praises of his wife, Sona Paparian. And lately he's had even more reason to rhapsodize. Bill, a 70-year-old criminal defense lawyer and former mayor of Pasadena, received the lifesaving gift of a kidney from his wife last month at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Neil Buchbinder, MD: 1942-2019

Neil Buchbinder, MD, passed away on Sept. 22. He was one of our legendary physicians from the era in which Cedars of Lebanon Cardiology became the renowned Cedars-Sinai Division of Cardiology. With William Ganz, Buchbinder performed the nation’s first successful coronary thrombolysis on his patient with acute myocardial infarction. 

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Using Note Templates in Canto

Clinicians can use system SmartTexts and personal SmartPhrases in their notes created on the mobile version of CS-Link™, Canto, available for the iPad. To use this feature use the "Notes Entry" activity after opening a patient's chart.

» Read more

A New Mark for the Future of Our Institution

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Today, Cedars-Sinai is introducing a new logo! As you read in this morning's memo, "Cedars-Sinai Unveils New Logo," from Art Ochoa, JD, senior vice president of Advancement and chief advancement officer, this new logo honors our legacy, while establishing a more approachable, legible and modern visual identity that reflects our commitment to be an accessible institution.

This is the first significant update to our logo in nearly 60 years. You will notice that we are no longer using a hyphen in the logo. However, we will continue to use the hyphen in text. Additionally, the color red is brighter, the color grey is softer, and our secondary colors are more lively and welcoming.

As we roll out this refreshed brand identity, here are some important things to note:

  1. The rollout process will be an evolution that prioritizes no waste. Do not throw away any materials with the old logo but continue to use them until you run out—after that, items will be replaced.
  2. Both old and new logos will coexist for a period of time.
  3. There will be no extraordinary expense attached to the rollout process.

Here are some ways that you can begin using our new brand style:

Update Your Email Signature

We have a unified approach to email signatures. Use the email signature tool to easily create your email signature, which you can copy and paste into your signature block in Outlook. Please do not adust the formatting or attach logos, graphics, backgrounds or quotes to your email signature.

Download New Templates

Frequently used digital materials have been updated and are available for use now, including templates for flyers, presentations and memos. You can find the templates available for download here. We have more templates coming soon. If you don’t see what you need, please check back in a few days.

Business Cards and Stationery

When you are ready to order new business cards and stationery, we are pleased to offer you a convenient ordering process. Don't forget to use up your existing material first! To order, please follow this link and click the "Login" button in the upper right-hand corner and register. Once your registration is approved, product selections will become available.

Promo Item Store

We've updated merchandise and are pleased to offer an online ordering portal. Please visit the wholesale promo item store to place orders for your marketing and promotional needs. If you are looking for an item that is not on the store, contact brand@cshs.org.

Need to use the new logo?

If you have materials that require a logo, please submit an online request. The Brand Strategy and Creative Services team will be managing logo uses in order to preserve the integrity of our brand.

This request link, along with many of the links and resources described, will be available on the intranet. You can find them by going to Home/Administrative/Marketing & Communications or by clicking here.

For more information, contact brand@cshs.org.

 

 

 

Letter From Chief of Staff: Invitation to the Annual Meeting of the Medical Staff

The annual meeting of the medical staff is approaching—Monday, October 14—and I hope you can join us in Harvey Morse Auditorium at 11:30 a.m. for a complimentary lunch, industry insights and recognition of the outstanding work performed this year.

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, and Jeff Smith, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, will join us to present their insights, and I will be presenting the Chief of Staff Report.

This year, we ask you to bring your appetites, as there will be a new lunch menu offered—as well as some surprise giveaways.

During the program, we also will honor two of your peers for their exceptional efforts: Moshe Arditi, MD, will receive the Pioneer in Medicine Award, and Mark J. Ault, MD, will receive the inaugural Master Clinician Award, which recognizes clinical expertise that has advanced healthcare both at Cedars-Sinai and in the community.

Come enjoy good food with our physician community, learn about the current and future healthcare environment and join us in honoring our 2019 award recipients.

Please see the full agenda for the meeting in the PDF. I look forward to seeing you there.

Clement C. Yang, MD
Chief of Staff

Medical Staff Meeting Agenda (PDF)  

Physicians and Nurses Encouraged to Attend Free Wellness Course Oct. 18

Physicians and nurses are encouraged to attend a free one-day wellness course on Friday, Oct. 18, to examine the importance of wellness and provide recommendations, tools and resources that healthcare professionals can utilize to develop resiliency, work-life balance and self-care.

The course, initiated by the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences and sponsored by Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, and the medical staff, will be held in Harvey Morse Auditorium. The event is open to all physicians, fellows, residents and nurses throughout Cedars-Sinai, including the medical network and affiliate hospitals.

"With a growing body of literature on the need to improve wellbeing of healthcare professionals, Cedars-Sinai remains committed to helping our healthcare teams find better balance and joy in the work they selflessly provide each day," said Waguih William IsHak, MD, professor and vice chairman of Education and Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. "This course is intended to take a step-by-step, practical approach to improve wellness."

The course will feature several guest speakers from inside and outside the organization, including an opening address by Arnold Gilberg, MD, PhD, and Bruce Gewertz, MD, surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery. The closing keynote will feature Roger Walsh, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry, philosophy and anthropology at the University of California, Irvine.

In addition to three lectures and 16 breakout sessions, attendees will also participate in practice skills such as meditation, yoga, breathing and storytelling. Small focus groups are also included in the agenda, including ones specifically designed for female doctors, nurses, trainers and Cedars-Sinai's Schwartz's rounds.   

Attendees can expect to:

  • Acquire and practice stress management skills
  • Develop the skills necessary for sustained wellness
  • Acquire and practice emotional intelligence skills 
  • Actively participate in wellness activities

In the U.S., healthcare professionals suffer more burnout than other workers, with prevalence rates as high as 50% in physicians. Extensive research over the past decade illustrates that this issue could have a profound effect on the quality of patient care and there is concern that it might lead to early departure from the practice of medicine.

"These statistics must change, because our healthcare professionals deserve better," said Clement C. Yang, MD, FACP, chief of staff. "Thanks to the generous support of Mr. Priselac, we can address the concerns affecting our brilliant healers and help them find joy in medicine once again."

In addition to CME credits for physicians, internal medicine physicians could earn eight MOC hours towards maintenance of the American Board of Internal Medicine certification.

Space is limited. Register at the Wellness Course website.

Parking Rate Changes Coming in November

Our organization has been working hard to identify ways in which we can operate more efficiently while upholding our mission to our patients and the community. With your help, we've implemented many strategic decisions to help us achieve our goals—decisions that allow us to continue investing in our organization, its people and resources.

Most recently, we surveyed the current parking rates for patients, visitors, employees and faculty physicians at our lots and garages. After a thorough analysis, we will be adjusting parking rates in November for all full-time, part-time and per-diem Cedars-Sinai Medical Center employees, independent contractors and faculty physicians who pay for parking.

The new rates will be as follows:

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This tiered approach to parking rates closely models our tiered approach to medical benefits and takes into consideration the range of salaries of our individual employees. For some employees, parking rates will decrease. For others, rates will increase. The new parking rates will be reflected in your Nov. 15 paycheck. Additionally, daily parking rates for our patients and visitors will change beginning Monday, Nov. 4. Information about those rate changes will be shared in the following weeks and also can be found in the FAQ below.

For more than two decades, Cedars-Sinai has maintained parking rates and subsidized much of the cost of parking for our employees and patients. Now, we are adjusting our rates to reflect current industry standards. As an example, employees at UCLA Health pay between $83 and $152 a month for parking. At Keck Medicine of USC, employees pay between $81 and $172 a month for parking.

We believe our tiered approach—again, structured like our benefits model and based on compensation—sets our rates at a reasonable cost. In most cases, our rates are still much lower than those of our healthcare counterparts. We hope you understand our need to make these adjustments. The attached FAQ provides more information about the rate changes.

Please remember that our Rideshare Program provides many great options for commuting to work, including subsidies for public transportation and rewards for alternative means of getting to work, such as bicycling or walking. For example, we are doubling our subsidy for bus and Metro passes from $50 to $100. Additionally, we are re-evaluating parking lot assignments to ensure employees are parking as close as possible to their assigned work areas. You will be notified if your lot assignment changes.

Thank you for continued dedication, understanding and support.

- Jeff Smith, MD, JD, MMM, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and CEO, Cedars-Sinai Marina del Rey Hospital

- Andy Ortiz, senior vice president, Human Resources

Parking Employee FAQ (PDF)  

Rideshare Program (PDF)  

Physician Wellness Tip: Deciding How Much to Eat

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Deciding what to put on your plate at meal time can be hard. You want to eat healthy, but you also want to feel satisfied. The good news is that you don't have to figure out nutritional value versus calories on your own.

Forget the old food pyramid. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has a new online tool called MyPlate. It can help you and your family make smarter choices in a fun, engaging way.

Check out how MyPlate can make mealtime easier at myplate.gov.

High Holidays Services Set for Oct. 8-9

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Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department, will conduct services for the High Holidays at Cedars-Sinai. The services also will feature cantor Jordan Gorfinkel.

  • Kol Nidre—Tuesday, Oct. 8, 6:30-8 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium
  • Yom Kippur—Wednesday, Oct. 9, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium

The services will be available for viewing on Channel 50 of the inpatient TV system. 

If you have questions, contact Spiritual Care at ext. 3-5550.

Holiday of Sukkot Begins Sunday, Oct. 13

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A sukkah from a previous celebration is shown.

The Jewish Festival of Sukkot begins at sunset Sunday, Oct. 13, and lasts until dusk Monday, Oct. 21.

The holiday will bring the construction of a large bamboo hut on the Plaza Level Terrace. The hut is called a sukkah, a temporary shelter that serves as a hub of the weeklong celebration.

The holiday of Sukkot (pronounced soo-COAT) is based on a verse in Leviticus, which commands observant Jews to live in temporary shelters for seven days and seven nights. The ephemeral nature of the sukkah (SOO-kah) commemorates the 40 years during which the Israelites wandered the Sinai Desert after escaping from captivity in Egypt.

During the weeklong celebration, Jews eat and sometimes sleep in the sukkah. Each sukkah must have at least three walls and be large enough to dwell in. The roof must be made from materials that were grown in the ground, such as wood, thatch or bamboo, with the pieces spaced wide enough apart to see the stars.

The holiday ends with the festival Simchat Torah, where traditionally Jews dance in their synagogues with the Torah scrolls.

 

 

Cedars-Sinai Earns Top Score on Hospital Equality Index

Cedars-Sinai achieved a score of 100 on the 2019 Human Rights Campaign Healthcare Equality Index. The score confers on the health center a "Leader in LGBTQ Healthcare Equality" designation.

The Healthcare Equality Index is an annual survey that evaluates medical centers' policies and practices that focus on equitable and inclusive care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer patients and their families. About 680 health institutions participated in the 2019 survey—the group's 12th annual review.

"Cedars-Sinai is working to strengthen our diversity to create an inclusive and engaging environment and to become a leader among the nation's healthcare organizations," said Nicole Mitchell, director of Diversity and Inclusion, HR, at Cedars-Sinai. "Recognitions such as this are important to show our commitment to inclusive care that is sensitive, welcoming and free from discrimination regardless of one’s LGBTQ status."

Cedars-Sinai earned perfect scores in each of the following categories:

  • Patient Non-Discrimination
  • Visitation Non-Discrimination
  • Staff Training
  • Patient Services & Support
  • Employee Benefits & Policies
  • Patient & Community Engagement
  • Responsible Citizenship

One Kidney and 37 Years of Marriage

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Bill and Sona Paparian relax at home following their successful kidney transplant.

After 37 years of marriage, William M. (Bill) Paparian still sings the praises of his wife, Sona Paparian. And lately he’s had even more reason to rhapsodize.

Bill, a 70-year-old criminal defense lawyer and former mayor of Pasadena, received the lifesaving gift of a kidney from his wife last month at Cedars-Sinai. What's more, Sona, 63, was the one in the family who first learned about, and pushed for, the relatively little-known process that allowed him to receive her kidney even though they have different blood types.

The result: Instead of the likelihood of waiting years for a kidney transplant—or possibly never receiving one—Bill got the new organ 10 months after beginning dialysis.

Sona downplays what she did. She can't even remember debating the idea in her own mind. She said it came to her in "just an instant. It was a natural thing."

For his part, Bill, who was diagnosed with kidney disease more than a decade ago, is effusive about Sona's courage and perseverance. "My wife stepping up like this is a real testament to our relationship. It's very strong," he said.

Before the surgeries were performed, when Bill told people about the pending transplant—including a judge he asked in court to postpone one of his cases—"The way they reacted was really something to see. They said, `Wow, what a woman. You're a lucky man to have a wife like that.'"

The Paparians are telling their story to help spread the word that blood group, or ABO, incompatible transplants, can be performed—albeit still only at a limited number of leading hospitals in the U.S.

At Cedars-Sinai, one of the nation's top providers of immunologically incompatible kidney transplants, about 200 have taken place since the hospital began doing them in 2005. They offer "excellent outcomes long-term," according to Stanley C. Jordan, MD, director of Nephrology and Transplant Immunology and medical director of the Kidney Transplant Program. He said success rates are in line with lower-risk compatible kidney transplants.

Most kidney donations come from people who have died, but ABO incompatible transplants can motivate more living donors to provide kidneys so that their loved ones get needed organs as promptly as possible.

ABO incompatible transplants also offer some advantages over another option for living donors, "paired exchange" programs. In those, prospective donors with blood types that are incompatible with the people they most want to help can give organs that will go to someone else. In exchange, their loved ones are matched with compatible donors and they receive transplants much sooner than they would otherwise.

Many hospitals offer paired exchanges "and that’s certainly a reasonable way to go," Jordan said. "However, it's sometimes difficult in the sense that the logistics require kidneys to be taken out, shipped across country or to different centers, and not everybody wants to participate in that.”

At Cedars-Sinai, where both ABO incompatible and paired exchange transplants are offered, "It's nice that people have a choice," said Jordan, who led the development of a process that greatly reduces the risk of the body rejecting a new kidney. That process has been instrumental in the success of ABO incompatible transplants.

Bill's path to a transplant began nearly a dozen years ago when he was diagnosed with kidney disease. By 2015, his doctor in Pasadena told him he would need a transplant, and the following year he came to Cedars-Sinai, which put him on the national waiting list for patients needing kidneys.

Bill initially resisted going on dialysis. He went on a strict renal diet and even sought stem cell therapy in Florida.

In October of last year, however, he nearly collapsed while attending a event, and his doctor at Huntington Hospital told him he needed to begin dialysis. Through it all, he kept up a full-time routine as a lawyer, going to 3½-hour dialysis sessions early in the morning wearing a business suit, and then heading to work.

Meanwhile, Sona contacted hospitals around the country to find out if there was some way she could donate a kidney to her husband. She discovered that there was such an option, and that one of the places where it was performed was Cedars-Sinai. So the Paparians returned to Cedars-Sinai and, after 10 months of intensive medical tests, they were cleared for the transplant.

The surgeries went well. The Paparians recovered at home, under the watchful eyes of two of their three grown sons. They both are going to the gym regularly, and Bill is back at work.

For Sona, the transplant is a new twist in a long-running love story. The two met in 1981 while Sona, who grew up in Aleppo, Syria, was visiting her older brother, who already was living in the U.S. Her brother introduced Bill and Sona, and that same day the two stayed up all night talking, causing Sona to miss her flight the next day back to Syria, where she had been eager to return. Within two weeks, before Sona got on another flight home, Bill proposed to her, and they were married the next year on Valentines Day.

"Maybe destiny has something to do with that," Sona said.

"Look at it now, Aleppo is ruined and I'm here," she added, referring to the devastating Syrian civil war. "Somebody must have been watching over me."

Then Sona, indulging in some kidding with her husband, looked to Bill and said maybe that someone actually was watching "over him, to get my kidney!"

 

 

 

Neil Buchbinder, MD: 1942-2019

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Neil Buchbinder, MD

It is with regret that we inform you that Neil Buchbinder, MD, passed away on Sept. 22.

Buchbinder was one of our legendary physicians from the era in which Cedars of Lebanon Cardiology became the renowned Cedars-Sinai Division of Cardiology. After completing his medical and internal medicine training at the University of Miami, Buchbinder began his academic career as a fellow in Cardiac Pathology with the world's leading cardiac pathologist William Roberts, MD, at the National Institutes of Health. He then became a cardiology fellow at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, and, in 1974, was appointed associate director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory by HJC Swan, MD, PhD, director of the Division of Cardiology. During this era, the cardiology division was emerging as a national leader.

In 1977, Swiss cardiologist Andreas Gruentzig, MD, electrified the cardiology world by inventing coronary balloon angioplasty. Buchbinder traveled to Switzerland, mastered the procedure and returned to perform the first coronary balloon angioplasty in Los Angeles.  In the years that followed, as Cedars-Sinai moved to the nation's forefront in development of new cardiac devices and therapy, Buchbinder led the use of cutting-edge breakthroughs in the Cedars-Sinai catheterization laboratory. With William Ganz, Buchbinder performed the nation's first successful coronary thrombolysis on his patient with acute myocardial infarction. With Peter Barath, MD, Buchbinder was the first to deploy the highly successful cutting balloon catheter developed at Cedars-Sinai.

For decades, Buchbinder was the medical center's most sought-after referral cardiologist for cardiac catheterization, known for his dedication to the highest principles of his profession and to the health and wellbeing of his patients. He was a doctor's doctor, who so many of us depended on for our care and personal advice and the care of our loved ones. He is survived by his wife Sue, son Marc, and grandchildren Brooke, 11, and Nathaniel, 2.

- Daniel Berman, MD
- Jim Forrester, MD
- John Friedman, MD

CS-Link Tip: Using Note Templates in Canto

Clinicians can use system SmartTexts and personal SmartPhrases in their notes created on the mobile version of CS-Link™, Canto, available for the iPad. To use this feature use the "Notes Entry" activity after opening a patient's chart.

This will open a blank note associated with the encounter. Once there tap on the magnifying glass to search for a template or tap on a Speed Button, if you've already configured some. You can move between SmartLists and wildcards either by tapping on them directly, using the right and left arrows, or the F2 button on the screen.

The fields highlighted in pink are incomplete SmartLists or wildcards. They change to a green highlight once completed. Though advanced features, such as NoteWriter and ProcDoc forms, are not fully supported in Canto at this time, you can always start the note in Canto and finish it later in CS-Link.

To see a short clip on how to use templates in Canto, see Epic's What’s New Site for Providers. For additional information, please refer to the CS-Link™ Canto for iPad Quick Start Guide.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.