sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY September 2012 Issue | Archived Issues

Physician news

Nicholas Nissen, MD, has been appointed as director of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more


Featured publication

The following article was published by members of the Department of Surgery:

» Read more


Grant announcements

The Department of Surgery Research Division would like to congratulate the following grant recipients:

» Read more


Mark your calendar


Grand rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Surgery scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

» Read more

Treatment of cardiac tumors

Because primary cardiac tumors are rare, many hospitals refer their cases to Cedars-Sinai where the most advanced treatment is routinely available. Tumors of the heart typically present in one of four ways: 1) they are found incidentally; 2) after embolization or stroke; 3) with obstruction of blood flow; or 4) with vague constitutional symptoms.

» Read more

Minimally invasive thoracic surgery for hyperhidrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome

Patients with sweaty palms and thoracic outlet syndrome benefit from minimally invasive thoracic surgery. While many know the impact of minimally invasive thoracic surgery has had on treatment of lung cancer and esophageal cancer, there are other conditions, such as hyperhidrosis and thoracic outlet syndrome, for which minimally invasive thoracic surgery is also very beneficial.

» Read more

Improving OR utilization, availability and throughput

Operating room scheduling and utilization were the topic of one presentation at the Department of Surgery Performance Improvement Committee meeting earlier this month.

Scheduling and Utilization - Dept. of Surgery PIC Sept. 5, 2012 (PDF)

» Read more

Attendings encouraged to apply to Clinical Professorial Series

Attending physicians at Cedars-Sinai who actively participate in the Cedars-Sinai teaching mission are now eligible for appointment in the Clinical Professorial Series. Academic titles are conferred via a peer-review process similar to other institutions of higher learning. The series launched early this year.

» Read more

Protect patients from harm by getting a flu vaccination

Be sure to protect yourself and our patients from getting the flu. By not getting the flu vaccination, you are putting patients at risk of infection.




» See clinic dates and times

Navigating Crimson on your own

New tutorial enables MDs to surf the physician performance site whenever they like

Cedars-Sinai physicians who have undergone a review of their performance with a Crimson adviser can now have access to their own data 24/7.

» Read more

Medical Library offers fall classes

The Cedars-Sinai Medical Library kicked off its fall schedule of classes this month. The classes are designed to help you navigate and search our resources for the information you need.


» Read more

Circle of Friends honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 119 people in August. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» See the names of those honored

Noble appointed chair of Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine

Paul W. Noble, MD, an international leader in pulmonary medicine, has been named chair of the Department of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Noble comes to Cedars-Sinai from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., where he has been professor and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine since 2006.

» Read more

FDA alerts for Revatio, stomach acid drugs

Pharmacy focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued alerts regarding the prescribing of Revatio® (sildenafil) to children and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrheabeing associated with proton pump inhibitors

» Read more

Breast cancer awareness events at Cedars-Sinai

Throughout October, Cedars-Sinai will be hosting events to raise awareness about breast health. Register at www.cedars-sinai.edu/breastmonth.


» See a list of events

Treatment of cardiac tumors

Cardiac echocardiography

Because primary cardiac tumors are rare, many hospitals refer their cases to Cedars-Sinai where the most advanced treatment is routinely available. Tumors of the heart typically present in one of four ways: 1) they are found incidentally; 2) after embolization or stroke; 3) with obstruction of blood flow; or 4) with vague constitutional symptoms.The diagnostic approach relies upon echocardiography (shown above), MRI, and CT to define the presence of a tumor and its anatomic relationship to normal structures.

Most benign lesions are treated with complete resection via a full sternotomy. However, here at Cedars-Sinai, a minimally invasive robotic approach is used under the leadership of Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS, director of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery and the Estelle, Abe and Marjorie Sanders Endowed Chair in Cardiac Surgery. This system enables complex minimally invasive surgery and microsurgical procedures which conventional surgical techniques cannot achieve.The robot consists of four mechanical arms. The surgeon can precisely control the surgical instruments and endoscope with his hands. A video display of the high-definition endoscopic image allows the surgeon to see inside the patient's body in far greater detail.

A malignant lesion, however, remains treatable only by a full sternotomy. In general, sarcomas proliferate rapidly, and cause death through widespread infiltration of the myocardium, obstruction of blood flow through the heart, and/or distant metastases. The poor results with surgical resection have led to occasional attempts to treat patients with cardiac transplantation, a method which introduces its own set of issues.

However, an alternative treatment, cardiac autotransplantation, can take the place of complicated transplants. In these cases, the heart is excised, the tumor is resected ex vivo, and the heart is reconstructed before being reimplanted. The advantage of this procedure is the increased ease with which major resection and reconstruction can be performed, while at the same time avoiding the need for antirejection treatment. The disadvantage, however, is that removing the heart from the body cavity is time consuming and requires more surgery. For this reason, yet another method, invivo repair, also has been developed. Although technically more challenging it is faster and less invasive

Such was the case confronting a Cedars-Sinai cardiothoracic surgeon on a recent weekend. Danny Ramzy, MD,PhD, FRCSC, received a call for a 53-year-old female, who had presented to another hospital with hemoptysis and varying heart failure symptoms, which included a two week siege of shortness of breath.

Cardiac histologyThe heart failure work up revealed a large mass occluding 80 percent of the left atrium. Obstruction to the mitral valve had resulted in severe mitral stenosis. While the etiology of the mass was initially unknown, the emergent issue was its two mobile components, raising the potentially fatal prospect of embolization. Because of the emergency circumstances, the team was unable to await the histology results (at right).

Cardiac mass Upon entering the atrium, the left atrium was resected,along with the intra atrial septum, a portion of the right atrium and the mass, itself (at left). Reconstruction was then performed using bovine pericardium, bypassing the need for transplantation. The mitral valve repair also was completed without the need for replacing the valve. The patient did well in recovery, with discharge following postoperatively on day five.

In spite of the overall success of the operation, unfortunately her final pathology demonstrated the mass to be a high-grade pleomorphic sarcoma.

In general, complete resection is the treatment of choice for sarcomas. Yet most patients develop recurrent disease and die of their malignancy even if their tumor can be completely resected. The median survival is typically six to 12 months, although long-term survival has been reported with complete resection. Patients with low-grade sarcomas also may have a better prognosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been used in an effort to improve on the poor results with resection alone. However, most of the published experience consists of anecdotal case reports, and no randomized trials have been conducted. Radiation has been used infrequently, and primarily as a treatment of metastases.

In spite of the challenging prognosis, the emergency surgery performed by the Cedars-Sinai on-call surgeon has given this patient the only chance she can possibly have.

Submitted by the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery.

Minimally invasive thoracic surgery for hyperhidrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome

Patients with sweaty palms and thoracic outlet syndrome benefit from minimally invasive thoracic surgery. While many know the impact of minimally invasive thoracic surgery has had on treatment of lung cancer and esophageal cancer, there are other conditions, such as hyperhidrosis and thoracic outlet syndrome, for which minimally invasive thoracic surgery is also very beneficial.

Palmar hyperhidrosis

A female cadet at the police academy dropped bullets from her wet hands as she tried to load her gun. Her supervisor told her to go get that fixed... When a box slipped out of his wet hands, it landed on the feet of a worker at a warehouse and broke his toes... No one would dance with the 13-year-old girl with the cold wet hands... What do these three people have in common?

They all suffer from palmar hyperhidrosis, an under-appreciated, very debilitating condition.It can have a huge negative impact on quality of life, cause embarrassment with social interaction, and ability to work.

When medical management fails to correct the problem, sympathectomy can be performed.It is a simple, outpatient minimally invasive operation performed through one or two tiny incisions.

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

In one case, a 23-year-old male developed a swollen blue arm after exercising strenuously. Studies showed he sustained an effort thrombus (Paget–Schroetter syndrome). Anti-coagulation dissolved the clot, but studies show that there is a high likelihood of recurrence unless the compression on the subclavian vein is relieved.

In another case, a 33-year-old woman fell at work and landed on her left shoulder. She immediately developed vascular headaches, shoulder and neck pain that radiated to her hand, and numbness in her fourth and fifth fingers. When PT, TENS unit, and medical management failed to solve the problem, she was referred for surgical treatment. An MR performed with her arm and abducted showed compression of the brachial plexus. Because her symptoms responded temporarily to a scalene muscle block, she has approximately, an 80 percent chance of benefit from surgery.

Both patients suffer from manifestations of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). The mainstay of surgical treatment for that is resection of the first rib. To improve the safety of the procedure, thoracic surgeons at Cedars-Sinai developed a minimally invasive operation that provides great exposure for the rib, subclavian vessels and the brachial plexus.

Thoracic Surgery at Cedars-Sinai is leading the charge to develop and introduce minimally invasive surgery into our specialty.

Submitted by the Division of Thoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery.

Improving OR utilization, availability and throughput

Operating room scheduling and utilization were the topic of one presentation at the Department of Surgery Performance Improvement Committee meeting earlier this month.

Among the initiatives presented:

  • Reviewing block utilization at six month intervals; fairly and impartially reallocating blocks
  • Informing surgeons monthly if their utilization is low
  • Encouraging surgeons to amalgamate into groups for block allocation purposes
  • Creating larger banks of open time using reallocation process
  • Pushing release times further out when feasible
  • Encouraging release of block a month prior to vacations or meetings
  • Reviewing standards for retaining simultaneous rooms
  • Moving toward either half-day or full-day blocks with 0715 starts

Click on the PDF below to view the entire presentation:

Scheduling and Utilization - Dept. of Surgery PIC Sept. 5, 2012 (PDF)

Attendings encouraged to apply to Clinical Professorial Series

Attending physicians at Cedars-Sinai who actively participate in the Cedars-Sinai teaching mission are now eligible for appointment in the Clinical Professorial Series. Academic titles are conferred via a peer-review process similar to other institutions of higher learning. The series launched early this year.

"We are a long-standing academic medical center and teaching hospital, and we have been for years," said William Brien, MD, chair of the inaugural Clinical Academic Promotions and Appointments Council. "Over the years our academic and teaching programs have grown substantially, and in response we have implemented a mechanism to recognize the significant clinical teaching, research and other academic work taking place at Cedars-Sinai."

The clinical professorial series is open to all members of the medical staff. The selection process is open to full-time, part-time and volunteer physicians at the medical center.

Eli M. Baron, MD, a neurosurgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Spine Center, received his clinical professorial appointment on July 3, one of the first physicians in the program. He is now a clinical associate professor of neurosurgery.

"It's an important step because an academic appointment reflects your background and training," Baron said. "Without this on-going peer-reviewed feedback and title, there's no acknowledgement or recognition of the fact that there are differences among various physicians' academic backgrounds."

The review process requires physicians to meet rigorous criteria and undergo review by a committee of peers selected from across campus.

"It's not simply an application," Baron said. "The appointment is a reflection of your background and training, and to receive it is a measure of achievement."

All attending physicians are encouraged to apply for an appointment; please contact Tara O'Shea, director of Academic Human Resources, at (310) 423-5539 or tara.oshea@cshs.org for additional information.

Protect patients from harm by getting a flu vaccination

Be sure to protect yourself and our patients from getting the flu. By not getting the flu vaccination, you are putting patients at risk of infection.

To date, nearly 2,000 employees have already received their flu vaccination.If you have not already done so, you can get a free flu shot at the following flu clinics. Those who wish to decline the vaccine are asked to wait until hospital plans are formalized for the 2012-13 flu season, which begins Oct. 1. Until further notice, Employee Health Services is not currently accepting flu vaccination declination forms.

  • Sept. 27
    • HMA lobby from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • HMCC-3 from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Sept. 28
    • HMCC-6 from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Oct. 1
    • HMA lobby from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • HMCC-3 from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Oct. 2
    • HMA lobby from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • Ray Charles Cafeteria Conference Room B from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Oct. 3- 5
    • HMA lobby from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • HMCC-3 from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment for a flu vaccination, please call Employee Health Service at ext. 3-3322.

Navigating Crimson on your own

New tutorial enables MDs to surf the physician performance site whenever they like

Cedars-Sinai physicians who have undergone a review of their performance with a Crimson adviser can now have access to their own data 24/7.

Tutorial sessions currently are being offered to assist physicians in navigating the Crimson website and drilling down to information that can help them optimize their outcomes. Crimson is a web-based educational tool that displays clinical performance of individual physicians and groups in an easily understandable way. It allows physicians to look at their own risk-adjusted patient data as well as compare themselves to other groups in their specialty, both within and outside of Cedars-Sinai. The software is used by more than 650 hospitals in the U.S., representing 25 percent of all hospital patients across the nation.

The program is being led by Harry C. Sax, MD, senior physician liaison for Cedars-Sinai Medicine and vice chair of Surgery.

"One of the benefits of Crimson is that physicians now have access to objective, timely information that allows them to monitor how their patients fare relative to other physicians at Cedars-Sinai and national trends. It takes into account the severity of illness and guides the practitioner to areas of opportunity. Further, as we prepare for public reporting of data, doctors will be more aware of how they stand relative to their colleagues," Sax said.

Crimson software integrates data from multiple sources, such as the CS-Link™ patient accounting system and CS-Link EMR, as well as key quality and utilization measures, and presents it in an acuity adjusted manner. The data is then displayed in a dashboard format highlighting physician performance in key metrics compared to local and national benchmarks. Information on individual patients is available to the level of daily charges and resource utilization.

To date, more than 450 Cedars-Sinai physicians have met with their Crimson adviser to review and analyze their data. The feedback suggests a new level of individual empowerment in understanding each provider’s role in the care of our patients, according to Sax.

If you are interested in more information about personal use of Crimson, please contact Elisabeth Hallman, MBA, RN, at elisabeth.hallman@cshs.org or Allyson Lazar at allyson.lazar@cshs.org.

Medical Library offers fall classes

Library 170pxThe Cedars-Sinai Medical Library kicked off its fall schedule of classes this month. The classes are designed to help you navigate and search our resources for the information you need.

  • An introduction to library online resources
    • Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 11 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
    • No registration required
  • For the following appointment-only classes, email Caroline Marshall or call ext. 3-2315:
    • CINAHL
    • Web of Science
    • Ovid Medline

Visit the library's Intranet site for more information.

Circle of Friends honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 119 people in August.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Rebecca Allegretto, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC
  • Elvina M. Luistro, RN
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Ezra Maguen, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, RN, MN, AOCN
  • Lawrence S. Maldonado, MD
  • M. William Audeh, MD
  • Cecilia M. Mamaril, RN
  • Traci V. Babcock, RN
  • Daniel R. Margulies, MD
  • Lilit Baldjyan, RN
  • Ann McBride
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Robert McKenna, Jr., MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Katayoon Mehraban, RN
  • Marko Bukur, MD
  • Anne Meyer, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Bindumol Michael, RN
  • Kristi R. Butenschoen
  • Joel D. Mittleman, MD
  • Terri R. Carrillo, RTT
  • Esther Morrison, RN
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Christina T. Chen
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Bernice L. Coleman, PhD, ACNP-BC, FAHA
  • Julie A. Parker, RN
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Rinku V. Patel, RN
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Paolo-Noel D. Pavia
  • Coby B. Cowan
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Moise Danielpour, MD
  • Christina A. Penfield, MD, MPH
  • Mark M. Davidson, MD
  • Kristine Penner, MD
  • Erika M. Deuel
  • Sheryl Pinugu, CN
  • Elena Diaz, MD
  • Srikanth S. Rao, DO
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Shiela Romero
  • David E. Fermelia, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Jeremy S. Fine, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Carrie E. Fishman, CN
  • Paula Ruiz, PA-C
  • Charles Forscher, MD
  • Bonshere C. San Juan
  • Joyce N. Fox, MD
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Yelena Fridman, RN
  • Linda K. Schaefer, CTRS
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Oliver Severios
  • Ewina Fung, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Angelina C. Gamboa, RN
  • Jeffrey H. Sherman, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Editha A. Gatchalian, RN
  • Rimma Shvarts, RN
  • Danielle M. Gille
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Noel O. Goloran
  • Shirley Sinclair
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Liz M. Hernandez, RN
  • Thomas P. Sokol, MD
  • Sinead Hochberg
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Kevin M. Hsu, MD
  • Sari Steinberg, LCSW
  • Robin R. Hudson, RN, CPAN
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Mariko L. Ishimori, MD
  • Lenore M. Strum, RNC
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Michele Tagliati, MD
  • Mark E. Josephs
  • Quirina Talabong, RN
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Serkan Tusu
  • Harold L. Karpman, MD
  • Karis J. Ustares Welbourn, RN
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Andra E. Keener, RN
  • Edmundo E. Vasquez
  • Wesley A. King, III, MD
  • Marina Vaysburd, MD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Billy O. Villao
  • Dee Dee L. Klute-Evans, RN, MSN, CIC
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD
  • Joicey E. Kuruvilla, RN
  • Stacey A. Walker Crowley, NP
  • Mykel V. LeCheminant, RN, BSN
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN
  • Michelle Williams Evans, RN
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Matthew T. Wilson, MD
  • Michael Levesque, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Howard Wynne, MD
  • Inna Litvinsky, RN, BC, BSN
  • Sauchuen Yu
  • Christine T. Lorenzo, RN
 

Noble appointed chair of Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine

Noble headshotPaul W. Noble, MD, an international leader in pulmonary medicine, has been named chair of the Department of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

Noble comes to Cedars-Sinai from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., where he has been professor and chief of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine since 2006.

"We are pleased to welcome an outstanding clinician, scientist and educator of Dr. Noble's caliber to Cedars-Sinai," said Shlomo Melmed, MD, senior vice president for Academic Affairs and dean of the medical faculty at Cedars-Sinai. "His commitment to scholarly research resulting in improved treatments for patients is an excellent fit for our medical center's mission. Our strong Department of Medicine has long been a source of pride for Cedars-Sinai, and we are confident that the leadership reins are being placed into very capable hands."

Noble's clinical expertise and research focuses on unraveling mechanisms underlying chronic lung inflammation and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and developing novel treatments for these disorders. His research is heavily supported by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

Noble succeeds Glenn Braunstein, MD, who is stepping down after 26 years as chair of the Department of Medicine to a new role as Vice President for Clinical Innovation, leading an institution-wide initiative at Cedars-Sinai to implement best practices for integrated, accountable, coordinated care. Under Braunstein’s astute leadership, the Department of Medicine consistently has been recognized as a national leader in patient care, research discovery and education and has attracted prominent researchers and physicians from around the nation and the world to Cedars-Sinai.

Noble is a prolific author, with his original research appearing in the highest quality peer-reviewed publications, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Science and Nature Medicine. A deputy editor of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Noble has been a leading contributor to discovery in lung disease.

Noble, 54, who earned his bachelor’s degree at Haverford College and his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine, completed his residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at UC San Francisco and pulmonary and critical care fellowships at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine.

As an assistant professor of medicine at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he was founder and director of the Interstitial Lung Disease Clinic, before moving on to becoming professor of medicine and associate chief of pulmonary and critical care at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also formed an Interstitial Lung Disease Clinic. At Duke, he propelled his Division to the highest ranks in the nation for clinical care, research productivity and NIH funding.

An elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the American Association of Physicians, he has been a member of the editorial boards for the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology and the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. He also is a member of the scientific advisory board of the American Asthma Foundation.

FDA alerts for Revatio, stomach acid drugs

Pharmacy focus

Revatio® not recommended for children

Revatio® (sildenafil) should not be prescribed to children (ages 1 through 17) for pulmonary arterial hypertension, according to an alert from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The FDA's recommendation is based on a recent long-term clinical pediatric trial showing the following:

  • children taking a high dose of Revatio had a higher risk of death than children taking a low dose
  • the low doses of Revatio are not effective in improving exercise ability

Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children with this drug is an off-label use.

Revatio is a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension by relaxing the blood vessels in the lungs to reduce blood pressure and is approved to improve exercise ability and delay clinical worsening of PAH in adult patients (WHO Group I).

Click here to read the safety alert.

Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and stomach acid drugs

The use of stomach acid drugs known as proton pump inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), according to the FDA. A diagnosis of CDAD should be considered for patients taking proton pump inhibitors who develop diarrhea that does not improve.

The FDA also is reviewing the risk of CDAD in users of histamine H2 receptor blockers. H2 receptor blockers are used to treat conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach and small intestine ulcers, and heartburn.

Proton pump inhibitors include:

  • AcipHex® (rabeprazole sodium)
  • Dexilant® (dexlansoprazole)
  • Nexium® (esomeprazole magnesium)
  • Omeprazole® (omeprazole) OTC
  • Prevacid® (lansoprazole) and OTC Prevacid 24hr
  • Prilosec® (omeprazole) and OTC
  • Protonix® (pantoprazole sodium)
  • Vimovo® (esomeprazole magnesium and naproxen)
  • Zegerid® (omeprazole and sodium bicarbonate) and OTC

Click here to read the safety alert.

Breast cancer awareness events at Cedars-Sinai

Breast Cancer 140pxThroughout October, Cedars-Sinai will be hosting events to raise awareness about breast health.

Register at www.cedars-sinai.edu/breastmonth.

Cancer, sexuality and intimacy: Breast cancer support group meets Wednesday, Oct. 3, from 11 a.m. to noon at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Cancer and relationships: Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 6:30-8 p.m. at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Spirituality and illness: Thursday, Oct. 11, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Breast cancer support group: Wednesday, Oct. 17, from 11 a.m. to noon at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Restorative yoga: Thursday, Oct. 18, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Wear Pink Day: Wear pink to support breast cancer awareness on Thursday, Oct. 24. A group photo is scheduled at 5 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

Spirituality and cancer: Lecturer and author Marianne Williamson on Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 6:30-8 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium

Coping with the fear of recurrence: Thursday, Oct. 25, from 6:30-8 p.m. at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Hormone therapy options: William Audeh, MD, is the featured speaker on Monday, Oct. 29, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at 310 N. San Vicente Blvd., Third Floor

Click the link below to download a PDF with all the events.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2012 (PDF)