sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY April 2013 | Archived Issues

Don't Tie Insurance Premiums to Lifestyle, Debate Judges and Audience Decide

Plenty of statistics – leavened with good, clean humor and wit – were thrown out during the 10th Annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition. The competition played out in front of a standing-room-only crowd estimated at over 300 physicians, nurses, administrators and friends of the medical center.

» Read more

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery Keeps Growing

By William W. Brien, MD

The Division of Orthopaedic Surgery continues its decade-long growth. In the past year we have continued our recruitment of nationally recognized orthopaedic surgeons to join our division.

» Read more

Femoroacetabular Impingement: Case Example

By Justin Saliman, MD

JW is a 48-year-old male who presented complaining of chronic hip pain that had been progressive over the past 20 years. He localized his pain specifically to the anterolateral groin region and had a positive C-sign. He had increased symptoms after sitting for long periods, as well as with exercise and prolonged walking.

» Read more

Keeping Dancers on Their Feet

By Margo K. Apostolos, PhD

The ballet dancer takes off from the stage on one foot, turns in the air, and lands gracefully on the other foot: tour jete. The wide receiver takes off from the turf on one foot, turns in the air, catches the football and lands on the other foot in the end zone: touchdown. Both dancer and athlete are performing a technical maneuver, and both can wind up injured.

» Read more

Encrypting Email is Easy - Here's How

Physicians are reminded that federal laws require electronic protected health information to be secured, including when it is sent via email to addresses outside Cedars-Sinai. To assist you, the medical center's email system includes an easy way to use encryption to keep emailed information secure and protected from unauthorized access.

» Read more

Chung Wins CTSI Scholars Award

Alice Chung, MD, has been selected as a recipient of the 2013 CTSI Scholars Award for her grant titled "The effect of basal gene expression on prognosis and Herceptin resistance in operable Her2+ invasive breast cancer."



» Read more

Articles Accepted for Publication

Several articles involving members of the Department of Surgery have been accepted for publication.

» Read more

Chest Physiotherapy No Longer Routine Post-Op Order

A drop-down menu has been added on CS-Link™ to help remind physicians when it is appropriate to order chest physiotherapy (CPT), which is no longer a routine post-operative order.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for March

The Circle of Friends program honored 154 people in March. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

» See the names of those honored

P&T Committee Adds Drugs to Formulary

Pharmacy Focus

Recent decisions by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee and pertinent agenda topics include several additions to the formulary and update on drug shortages.

» Read more

Once Common, Now Forgotten - What Is It?

Can you identify this instrument? The Cedars-Sinai Historical Conservancy is collecting materials for display. This instrument/device was recently donated. What is it?



» Read more

Don't Tie Insurance Premiums to Lifestyle, Debate Judges and Audience Decide

Above: Debate winner Tsuyoshi Todo, MD. Below: Todo with Surgery Department Chair Bruce Gewertz, MD, (center) and surgical resident Seth Felder, MD, Todo's opponent in the debate.

Plenty of statistics – leavened with good, clean humor and wit – were thrown out during the 10th Annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition. The competition played out in front of a standing-room-only crowd estimated at over 300 physicians, nurses, administrators and friends of the medical center.

The debate was a spirited interchange of well-researched remarks as each resident presented his argument. Peppered with verbal jabs, each argument was placed before the audience. The contestants weathered the storm of questions posed to them by the judges. Their closing arguments and summations reflected the intensity of the event.

But in the end, only one argument prevailed. Tsuyoshi Todo, MD, chief resident in Surgery, took home the Morgenstern trophy.

The debate took place April 18 in ECC A-C. This year’s debate focused on whether there should be a link between lifestyle choices and health insurance premiums.

Todo opposed such a policy, arguing that requiring individuals to pay increased healthcare premiums based on lifestyle choices would not only limit access to healthcare, but could raise healthcare costs and create more questions than solutions for the most underserved.

The judges, and an audience voting with its keypads, agreed with him.

Surgical resident Seth Felder, MD, argued in favor of the link. He said individuals who engage in unhealthy lifestyles, such as maintaining a poor diet and smoking, place a larger financial burden on the nation's healthcare system and economy. For that reason they should pay more per month.

Felder said 25 cents of every healthcare dollar is spent treating diseases or disabilities proven to result directly from unhealthy lifestyle choices. Obesity and smoking-related conditions are the most recognizable.

Medical care costs 42 percent more for an obese person than for someone considered normal weight. Likewise, the medical costs associated with a smoker are 40 percent more than those for a nonsmoker. Smoking is considered the No. 1 cause of preventable disease and death, Felder said. Asking these individuals to pay more might create an incentive for them to modify their lifestyle, Felder said.

Already, the federal Affordable Care Act legally ties lifestyle choices to premiums by allowing insurers to charge up to 50 percent more for people who smoke.

"Those who create an avoidable cost should pay an avoidable cost," Felder said.

Todo, however, argued that one emphasis of the Affordable Care Act is to ensure every American has access to affordable healthcare. Increasing premiums based on an individual's lifestyle choices defeats the purpose of the act, he said.

The annual debates are held in honor of the late Leon Morgenstern, MD, emeritus chair of the Department of Surgery and founder of the Center for Healthcare Ethics. Morgenstern died in late December.

Morgenstern's two sons attended the one-hour debate. A memorial service was held for him later that day.

This year's judges were Bruce Gewertz, MD, chair of the Department of Surgery, vice president for Interventional Services and vice dean of Academic Affairs; Sarah J. Kilpatrick, MD, PhD,  chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and associate dean of Faculty Development; Beth Y. Karlan, MD, director of the Women's Cancer Program at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and director of the Gilda Radner Hereditary Cancer Program; Jeanne Flores, senior vice president of Human Resources and Organizational Development; and Robin McCaffery, JD, associate legal counsel in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Legal Affairs.

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition is coordinated and moderated by Leo Gordon, MD.

Gordon solicits suggestions for upcoming debate topics. He may be reached at Leo.Gordon@cshs.org.

The response to this year’s debate has been remarkable with accolades pouring in from many segments of the Cedars-Sinai community. The common comment is: "This is the best hour of the medical center year!"

Next year’s debate will convene on April 24, 2014.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery Keeps Growing

By William W. Brien, MD
Executive Vice-Chair, Department of Surgery
Director, Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center

The Division of Orthopaedic Surgery continues its decade-long growth. In the past year, we have continued our recruitment of nationally recognized orthopedic surgeons to join our division.

Orthopedic oncologist Daniel Chris Allison, MD, joins Earl Brien, MD, making our musculoskeletal oncology service one of the largest programs on the West Coast. Foot and ankle surgeon David Thordarson, MD, joins Glenn Pfeffer, MD, in expanding our Foot and Ankle Center. We are pleased to welcome back pediatric orthopedic surgeon Robert M. Bernstein, MD, and upper extremity surgeon Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD, who has joined the Cedars-Sinai Medical Group and Myles Cohen, MD, David Kulber, MD, and Stuart Kuschner, MD.

We look forward to the recruitment of Thomas Kremen, MD, who is completing his fellowship training in sports medicine at Duke University, and will join Rodney Gabriel, MD, and Justin Saliman, MD, on our sports medicine service in September. We have a strong balance of voluntary, full-time and Medical Network faculty. This diversity is a programmatic strength, providing outstanding patient care and high-quality outcomes, clinical research and education. Sonu Ahluwalia, MD, is the clinical chief of the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery and is doing a great job in representing the division.

We began our orthopedic residency last year, and we have just matched our second resident class. We will have a total of eight orthopedic residents at Cedars-Sinai in July. Our incoming class of 2013 (four residents) are all AOA (graduated in the top 5 percent of their medical school class). What a great distinction. We continue to have a highly competitive orthopedic trauma fellowship program and will look to expand our fellowship programs in joint replacement and foot and ankle surgery. Our orthopedic residency and fellowship programs will drive and expand our educational and research programs.

Our research labs include biomechanics, stem cell regeneration and cell biology. Our clinical research program continues to grow with many peer-reviewed publications and scientific presentations at national meetings during the past year.

We offer educational courses to physicians and do educational outreach in our community. We have annual programs for primary care physicians, pediatricians and orthopedic trauma physicians.

We have a robust dance medicine program under Glenn Pfeffer, MD, and Margo Apostolos, PhD, who lead our Cedars-Sinai/USC Glorya Kaufman Dance Medicine Center. Pfeffer also leads our Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation program for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorders.

In the latest U.S. News and World Report rankings, Cedars-Sinai placed 12th in the nation in orthopedics - up from No. 22 in 2011-12.

Femoroacetabular Impingement: Case Example

By Justin Saliman, MD

JW is a 48-year-old male who presented complaining of chronic hip pain that had been progressive over the past 20 years. He localized his pain specifically to the anterolateral groin region and had a positive C-sign. He had increased symptoms after sitting for long periods, as well as with exercise and prolonged walking. Physical examination demonstrated a positive labral stress test, with severe discomfort on ranging the forward flexed and internally rotated leg. His exam also demonstrated decreased motion to hip flexion, abduction and external rotation.

Weight-bearing radiographs demonstrated femoroacetabular impingement and maintenance of the joint space. He was sent for an MR arthrogram, which demonstrated a large acetabular labral tear at the anterior superior rim and adjacent chondromalacia. Lidocaine was injected at the time of the arthrogram, and the patient noted temporary relief of symptoms. He was referred for six weeks of physical therapy. However, he was only able to complete four weeks due to a worsening of symptoms.

He was ultimately brought to the operating room where a large acetabular labral tear was identified. The adjacent acetabular cartilage demonstrated grade Ill chondromalacia and a positive wave sign (Fig. 1 below).The acetabular overhang was debrided to decrease impingement and to obtain a healthier anterolateral acetabular chondral margin. The labrum was repaired back to the new acetabular rim using Fiberwire® and three Arthrex PEEK Pushlock™ anchors (Fig. 2). When the traction was released, a good suction cup effect of the labrum on the femoral head was noted. The peripheral compartment demonstrated a large region of impinging camtype osteophytic change on the femoral neck, which was debrided by femoroplasty with an arthroscopic burr (Fig. 3a-b).

The patient reported significant pain relief at his one-week follow-up appointment and 95 percent symptom improvement by his three-month follow-up appointment. He felt improvement in range of motion and he was able ito return to symptom-free exercising.

Justin Saliman, MD, is a surgeon with the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center. This article was originally published in Advances in Orthopaedics.

Figure 1: Acetabular labral tear and adjacent chondromalacia

Figure 2: After acetabuloplasty and labral repair

Figure 3: Before femoroptasty (A) and after femoroplasty (B) with traction released

Figure 4: X-ray before femoroplasty (A) and after femoroplasty (B)

Keeping Dancers on Their Feet

Glenn Pfeffer, MD, and Margo K. Apostolos, PhD, co-directors of the Cedars-Sinai/USC Glorya Kaufman Dance Medicine Center, with dancer Kasia Wasilewska.

By Margo K. Apostolos, PhD
Co-Director, Cedars-Sinai/USC Glorya Kaufman Dance Medicine Center

The ballet dancer takes off from the stage on one foot, turns in the air, and lands gracefully on the other foot: tour jete. The wide receiver takes off from the turf on one foot, turns in the air, catches the football and lands on the other foot in the end zone: touchdown. Both dancer and athlete are performing a technical maneuver, and both can wind up injured.

Dancers and athletes push the human body to its limits, which means they often get hurt. Sports medicine specializes in the care, treatment and prevention of athletic injuries. Dancers are often stricken with specific injuries relating to the demanding tasks of training and performance, so dance medicine has emerged to specialize in the care, treatment and prevention of dance injuries.

Fourth Annual Dance Medicine Conference

Theme: The Dancer as the Ultimate Athlete

When and where: Oct. 19 at the Harvey Morse Conference Center

The conference will bring together sports medicine and dance medicine. Robert Bernstein, MD, medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center, will present the opening address on "Functional Anatomy for the Dancer."

A panel discussion on the similarities and differences between dancers and athletes will include experts from orthopedic surgery, physical therapy, athletic training, strength conditioning and coaching.

A celebrity panel will discuss transitions in merging dance and sports. The panel will feature Olympic athletes who have danced and dancers who have worked with athletes.

Breakout sessions will highlight orthopedics and physical therapy and will focus on common dance injuries.

Margo K. Apostolos, PhD, co-director of the Cedars-Sinai/USC Glorya Kaufman Dance Medicine Center, will offer a session on safe practices and progressions for teachers and choreographers.

To meet these needs, Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD, and I serve as co-directors and co-founders of the Cedars-Sinai/USC Glorya Kaufman Dance Medicine Center. At Cedars-Sinai, we have assembled a team of experts from the Orthopaedic Center, Outpatient Rehabilitation and the USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance.

In addition to Pfeffer, who is also director of the Cedars-Sinai Foot and Ankle Center, the orthopedic surgeons who specialize in dance medicine at Cedars-Sinai are: Robert M. Bernstein, MD, medical director of the Orthopaedic Center; William Hohl, MD, associate director of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Rodney Gabriel, MD; Guy Paiement, MD, associate director for Education at the Orthopaedic Center; Justin Saliman, MD; Andrew Spitzer, MD, director of the Joint Replacement Program; Leonel A. Hunt, MD; and Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD.

Outpatient Rehabilitation provides four dance-trained physical therapists.

I use my knowledge of dance to inform the unique ways in which our medical team interacts with each dancer to diagnose and treat an injury. As the primary contact with the dancer, I consult with the doctors and therapists about the needs of the patient.

The dance patient and I discuss their training, and an intake survey provides valuable information. My dance knowledge combined with standard medical treatment allows our center to innovate in the treatment of each dancer.

I teach dance, with many of my students having gone on to the stage (including Broadway), film and television. I also have trained professional and Olympic athletes, including more than 40 NFL players and more than 25 Olympians.

What is unique in my sports research is how I apply dance fundamentals differently for each sport. The hypothesis of my early work in Dance for Sports was that dance training may enhance athletic performance. I began to show each athlete dance skills that they could apply.

My Dance for Sport research has been presented at two International Olympic Committee scientific meetings – in 1999 in Sydney, Australia, and in 2003 in Athens, Greece – and at Cambridge University just before the 2012 London Olympics.

Encrypting Email is Easy - Here's How

Physicians are reminded that federal laws require electronic protected health information to be secured, including when it is sent via email to addresses outside Cedars-Sinai. To assist you, the medical center's email system includes an easy way to use encryption to keep emailed information secure and protected from unauthorized access.

When using the Cedars-Sinai email system, simply include the word "Zixencrypt" anywhere in the subject line of your message, and the email will automatically be encrypted as it leaves the Cedars-Sinai email system.

After your email is sent, the recipient will receive a notification message containing a link to the Zix Corp. Messaging Center website. After completing a one-time registration process, the recipient can log in to the Zix Message Center to view your message and attachments. Once a recipient opens the Zix Secure encrypted email message, a confirmation message will be returned to your mailbox to let you know the individual has picked up the email message.

As long as the recipient sends any replies through the Zix portal, the message and communications stays encrypted and secure. If the recipient forwards the message or copies and pastes any part of the message to an external email system, the information is no longer encrypted or secure, since it has been taken out of the Zix environment.

More information on sending emails securely using Zixencrypt can be found on the Intranet (only accessible within the campus network) at http://web.csmc.edu/administrative/eis/e-mail-support/e-mail-encryption-information/.

The consequences of not reasonably securing patients' protected health information, like emailing unencrypted PHI to an external email address, can include fines and penalties. Also, anyone who causes such a security breach, whether intentional or not, must be reported by name to any patient whose personal information was exposed. For employees and staff, there may be further consequences for violating Cedars-Sinai's policies regarding privacy and information security.

Chung Wins CTSI Scholars Award

Alice Chung, MD, has been selected as a recipient of the 2013 CTSI Scholars Award for her grant titled "The effect of basal gene expression on prognosis and Herceptin resistance in operable Her2+ invasive breast cancer."

Chung joined the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery's Division of Surgical Oncology in 2011. She was previously with the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, where she served as the assistant director of the Margie Petersen Breast Center.

Articles Accepted for Publication

The following articles involving members of the Department of Surgery have been accepted for publication:

  • V. Krishnan Ramanujan, PhD (principal investigator): "Mitochondrial NDUFS3 Regulates ROS-mediated Onset of Metabolic Switch in Transformed Cells" (in press), Biology Open (The Company of Biologists, U.K.).
  • Gertych A, Oh JH, Wawrowsky KA, Weisenberger DJ, Tajbakhsh J. 3-D DNA methylation phenotypes correlate with cytotoxicity levels in prostate and liver cancer cell models. BMC Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 Feb 11;14:11. Synopsis: The publication is based on a two-year study performed by the Translational Cytomics Group at Cedars-Sinai in collaboration with the USC Epigenome Center. The investigators succeeded in demonstrating that in situ chromatin textures, simply covisualized by immunofluorescence of nuclear 5-methylcytosine and global DNA and quantitated by sophisticated and dedicated 3D image analysis, correlate with cellular toxicity. The results underline the potential of such signatures to be utilized in the risk assessment of environmental influences as well as therapeutic reprogramming of cancer cells by epigenetic drugs that exert off-target DNA demethylation; with translational applications in environmental health and pre-clinical drug toxicology.

BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology Article - February 2013 (PDF)

Chest Physiotherapy No Longer Routine Post-Op Order

A drop-down menu has been added on CS-Link™ to help remind physicians when it is appropriate to order chest physiotherapy (CPT), which is no longer a routine post-operative order.

According to best practices, indications for the therapy are as follows:

  • Significant sputum production in patients who need help clearing secretions with volume of 30ml/day or more;
  • Acute segmental or lobar atelectasis (lung collapse) due to secretion retention/ mucus plugging;
  • Conditions such as cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis or lung abscess in which mucus clearance is an integral part of evidence-based therapy.

CPT is a manual therapy that employs percussion, postural drainage and vibration to loosen secretions in the respiratory tract. Despite guidelines used by the Respiratory Therapy (RT) Department over many years, very high utilization at Cedars-Sinai was noted in mid-2012, especially among surgical patients. In collaboration with members of the Cedars-Sinai Medicine team, Respiratory Therapy staff reviewed the latest literature and provided educational feedback to the medical staff in September 2012. However, CPT numbers remained high and even exceeded the previous year's numbers, according to Michael Lewis, MD, director of Cedars-Sinai's Respiratory Therapy Department.

C-S Medicine and RT investigators later discovered a major culprit: CPT remained in more than 30 order sets on CS-Link as routine prophylactic orders post-operatively for conditions that, upon review, were not compliant with established guidelines. The order sets were subsequently revised.

Chest physiotherapy has a long history as a prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of post-operative pulmonary complications. But studies dating back to the 1970s have shown that the treatment is not effective, and is potentially harmful to many groups of patients who routinely received it in the past.

"There was a perception that chest physiotherapy may prevent complications in many post-operative patients, but there is no good evidence to support that," says Lewis. "In fact, studies show the intervention in the wrong patient can worsen chest mechanics short-term and cause the amount of oxygen in the blood to fall."

"If there are significant amount of secretions, by all means, go ahead and use CPT. It's justified," Lewis adds. "But in patients who lack the indications, there is the potential for harm and no benefit."

CPT orders have dropped significantly in the past few months, due to several interventions that include the revised order sets, weekly monitoring reports and one-on-one education with high users. The following graph depicts the considerable progress made:

In conjunction with RT leadership, chest physiotherapy guidelines are one of several best practices developed by Cedars-Sinai Medicine teams, under the direction of Glenn D. Braunstein, MD, vice president for Clinical Innovation.

For more information, please contact Lewis at Michael.Lewis@cshs.org.

Circle of Friends Honorees for March

The Circle of Friends program honored 154 people in March. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Angelica Araiza
  • Harriet U. Aronow, PhD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Beverly A. Barlongo, RNC, BSN
  • Jana Baumgarten, MD
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Steven H. Black, RN
  • Derek Boardman, RN
  • Scott A. Braunstein, MD
  • Nathaniel D. Bravo
  • William W. Brien, MD
  • Chris G. Brown
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Mathew H. Bui, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Diana Campos
  • Cheryl G. Charles, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Arnold C. Cinman, MD
  • Lacie T. Clopton, RN
  • Jason S. Cohen, MD
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Marietta A. De Jesus, RN
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Julian A. Diaz, BSN
  • Doniel Drazin, MD
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Marla C. Dubinsky, MD
  • Anne L. Fischer, RN, CWOCN
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Genise N. Fraiman, MD
  • Andrew L. Freedman, MD
  • John D. Friedman, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Rodney A. Gabriel, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Seda M. Gharapetian, RN
  • Eli Ginsburg, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Jeremy R. Herman, MD
  • Mariko L. Ishimori, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Jay Jurkowitz, MD
  • Mitchell Karlan, MD
  • Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD
  • Harold L. Karpman, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Raj Khandwalla, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Sarah J. Kilpatrick, MD, PhD
  • Wesley A. King, III, MD
  • Abby E. Kistler, RN, BSN
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Dee Dee L. Klute-Evans, RN, MSN, CIC
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • David A. Kulber, MD
  • Karla Y. Larin
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN
  • Keren Lerner, MD
  • Nora B. Levid, RN, BSN
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Aliza A. Lifshitz, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Inna Litvinsky, RN, BC, BSN
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Belinda Luther, RNC, BSN
  • Hooman Madyoon, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Dwight L. Makoff, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Robert J. McKenna, Jr., MD
  • Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Pascale R. Middleton, RN
  • Gail Millan, MN, RN, BC
  • Melanie A. Miller, RN, CSPDM
  • Maria L. Murga
  • Robert T. Naruse, MD
  • Yosef Y. Nasseri, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Shi-Hui Pan, Pharm.D
  • Sophia Maria P. Pansacola, RN, BSN, CNOR, RN-BC
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Chirag G. Patil, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, Jr., MD
  • Robert B. Pompa, MD
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Ralph T. Potkin, MD
  • Lina Quintanilla
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Nina Redl
  • Maria L. Reyes
  • Richelle C. Robateau
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Steven B. Rubins, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Bessy G. Samayoa
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Chrisandra L. Shufelt, MD, MS
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Roy Silver, MD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Gena T. Smith, RN
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Meir Jonathon Solnik, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Kazu Suzuki, DPM
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Michael D. Tajon
  • Timothy Tattu, RN, BSN
  • Gary M. Tearston, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Mae M. Ushigome, MD
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Anabel Vazquez
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Alexandra M. Wierzbicki, RN, BSN, CN
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Howard Wynne, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • Christopher Zarembinski, MD
  • Hong Zhou, NP

P&T Committee Adds Drugs to Formulary

Pharmacy Focus

February decisions by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee and pertinent agenda topics are summarized in the PDF linked below. Highlights include several additions to the formulary and update on drug shortages.

P and T Committee Approvals - Feb. 5, 2013 (PDF)

Once Common, Now Forgotten - What Is It?

Can you identify this instrument?

The Cedars-Sinai Historical Conservancy is collecting materials for display. This instrument/device was recently donated. What is it?

If you recognize the instrument, please contact Leo Gordon, MD, at leo.gordon@cshs.org. You can also email him or reach him at (310) 423-5262 if you have an item you'd like to have reviewed for donation to the conservancy.

The conservancy's goal is to preserve the hospital’s history through donations of Cedars-Sinai memorabilia such as badges, stationery, photographs, protocol manuals and other keepsake items.