sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY June 2013 | Archived Issues

New Spaces at AHSP, San Vicente Building Help Department Continue to Innovate

Message from the Chair

As surgeons, we are familiar with the classic mortality/morbidity conference in which the causes of a less-than-ideal outcome are dissected and reviewed. The process is educational to be sure, but on occasion, it also allows for "out-of-the-box" thinking directed toward innovative operative techniques or methods for earlier recognition of problems. This spirit of discovery has been quite common at Cedars-Sinai, where many of the modern, paradigm-shifting, minimally invasive surgical techniques were developed in general surgery, thoracic surgery and orthopedics.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Enters New Era With PhD Graduation

Cedars-Sinai marked its transition to a degree-granting institution June 11 by awarding doctorates to seven students in its Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine. More than 140 faculty members in academic regalia, along with Cedars-Sinai’s top leaders, joined graduates, family members and friends in a festive inaugural commencement in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

AHSP Wows First Patients at Opening

The Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion opened to its first patients on Tuesday, and the 11-story, state-of-the-art facility didn't fail to impress. Neurology patient Girish Mody summed up his initial impression of the AHSP as "wow."

» Read more

New Procedure Center Goes Operational With First Surgery

Debra Hambleton left Cedars-Sinai recently with a new right hip – and the honor of being the first patient to undergo surgery in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion. Hambleton, who lives in Oxnard, had her right hip replaced on Friday, June 21, in Operating Room 7, on the fifth level of the Pavilion in the Sue and Bill Gross Surgery and Procedure Center.

» Read more

By Treating Open Wounds, Podiatrists Help Preserve Limbs

By Kazu Suzuki, DPM, CWS
and Jeffrey A. Klemes, DPM

Many practitioners consult podiatrists to fix a bunion, straighten a crooked toe, help the runner with heel pain, treat a sprained ankle, fix a broken bone, or treat the stubborn, infected ingrown toenail. But podiatrists also preserve toes, feet and limbs through their tireless work with wound care, amputation prevention and limb salvage.

» Read more

Surgical Fellows Announced

Eighteen doctors have been chosen as the 2013-14 incoming surgical fellows at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

The Circle of Friends program honored 137 people in May. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

» Read more

Weingarten Named Chief Clinical Transformation Officer

Scott Weingarten, MD, has been appointed to the new position of senior vice president and chief clinical transformation officer. "This new position reflects our commitment to achieve the same best-in-class performance in clinical efficiency throughout the health system, as we have demonstrated in quality and safety," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO.

» Read more

New Spaces at AHSP, San Vicente Building Help Department Continue to Innovate

Message from the Chair

As surgeons, we are familiar with the classic mortality/morbidity conference in which the causes of a less-than-ideal outcome are dissected and reviewed. The process is educational to be sure, but on occasion, it also allows for "out-of-the-box" thinking directed toward innovative operative techniques or methods for earlier recognition of problems. This spirit of discovery has been quite common at Cedars-Sinai, where many of the modern, paradigm-shifting, minimally invasive surgical techniques were developed in general surgery, thoracic surgery and orthopedics.

With the beginning of this academic year, the Department of Surgery has been presented with a number of exciting opportunities to continue our tradition of innovation. In late June, the department will begin using the new operating rooms and interventional suites on the fifth floor of the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion. The four interventional and/or cardiac imaging laboratory rooms are outfitted with state-of-the-art imaging technology.

Operating rooms are 650 to 800 square feet to accommodate ancillary equipment for a wide range of procedures. Finally, the waiting areas and recovery spaces are much more patient- and family-friendly and will facilitate more private discussions after surgical procedures.

Also in late June, the department will move into an exciting research and collaborative space at 825 San Vicente Blvd. This 8,600-square-foot facility includes a fully equipped OR/trauma simulation space with configurable walls and an observation room.

Other features include two glass-enclosed conference spaces, capable of holding up to 80 people with video links to our main operating rooms. The open informal space for meetings and discussions includes a number of unassigned but available private office spaces for faculty working on grant applications or other academic work.

The videos below and at the bottom of this column show the space at 825 San Vicente.

Finally, the Department's research administration team, headed by Jesse Null, will be located there to continue to facilitate its superb support of our growing research enterprise. This year our total research funds exceeded $9 million, with the majority in highly competitive federal grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.

These facility upgrades ensure that the hard work of our attending and faculty surgeons and house staff will be carried out in the most modern facilities. Future plans include the final construction of the hybrid cardiovascular OR on the sixth floor, the buildout of the Pavilion fourth floor as the primary outpatient operating site, and the design of four to six additional ORs contiguous to the current operating rooms on the fifth floor of the Professional Tower.

Acknowledging that the only constant in life is change, the department is bidding farewell to two individuals who greatly contributed to our success over the last seven years. Ali Salim, MD, who joined us in 2008 as program director of the general surgery residency, will be moving to Brigham and Woman's Hospital and Harvard University as section chief in trauma and critical care.

Ali achieved much here including a remarkable academic record of numerous nationally recognized publications and presentations. His leadership of the general surgery program contributed to a more than three-fold increase in the number of applications (to more than 700 for our four slots) and the nurturing of a superb resident group.

Finally, Joan August, the department's director since 2006, has been promoted to service line vice president with responsibility for the Departments of Medicine, OB-Gyn and Pediatrics, as well the Cancer Center.

Joan has been a great partner for Bryan Croft and me; through her imagination, superior interpersonal skills and simple hard work, she is undoubtedly responsible for a great deal of the growth and superb performance of the department. We are very proud of her and will continue to enjoy our work together in her new role.

By Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
H and S Nichols Endowed Chair in Surgery
Chair, Department of Surgery
Vice President, Interventional Services
Vice Dean, Academic Affairs

Cedars-Sinai Enters New Era With PhD Graduation

Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and chief executive officer, congratulates Maricel Gozo on receiving her PhD at the inaugural commencement of the Cedars-Sinai Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine. At right is Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, senior vice president of Academic Affairs, dean of the medical faculty, and Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Distinguished Chair in Investigative Medicine.

Cedars-Sinai marked its transition to a degree-granting institution June 11 by awarding doctorates to seven students in its Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine. More than 140 faculty members in academic regalia, along with Cedars-Sinai’s top leaders, joined graduates, family members and friends in a festive inaugural commencement in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

Arthur H. Rubenstein, MB BCh, professor of medicine and dean emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine, delivered the commencement address at the ceremony, which also included a teaching award for faculty.

New graduate Morgan Clond, PhD, (left) completed her work in the lab of Eric Ley, MD, (right) director of Surgical Intensive Care Units and of the Surgical Critical Care Residency Program.

"This is both a proud moment for our graduates and also a historic one for our medical center," said Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and chief executive officer. "Since 1902, this institution has been dedicated to superb patient care and advancing the frontiers of medical knowledge. … In 2013, we remain deeply committed to discoveries that improve the human condition and to educating future generations of medical professionals."

The Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine, founded in 2007, focuses on transforming laboratory discoveries into therapies, treatments and cures that directly benefit patients. In July 2012, it was accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges as meeting the most rigorous standards of higher learning – rare recognition for a program that had yet to graduate its first class.

Mentored by researchers and clinicians, the program's students complete several laboratory rotations, observe patient care and engage in structured workshops and seminars before preparing and defending their research dissertations.

The scientific interests of the 2013 graduates, who have contributed to numerous publications during their studies, are diverse. They include diabetic retinopathy, traumatic brain injury, breast cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome, synthesis of growth hormones, tumor immunology and bacterial infection.

"What you have already accomplished is amazing," Lawrence B. Platt chairman of the Cedars-Sinai Board of Directors, told the graduates in opening remarks. "But what you are about to embark upon will be astonishing: advancing health in ways that we cannot even begin to imagine. … We are so proud to have you represent the future of Cedars-Sinai."

Participants dressed in traditional regalia for the ceremony. Carrying the mace is David Underhill, PhD, professor and director of the graduate program.

The 2013 graduates are Morgan Clond, PhD, Tamar Eigler, PhD, Maricel Gozo, PhD, Michelle Jones, PhD, Amber Kaplan, PhD, Jane Z. Kuo, PhD, and Akop Seksenyan, PhD.

In the dean's address, Shlomo Melmed, MB ChB, senior vice president of Academic Affairs, dean of the medical faculty, and Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Distinguished Chair in Investigative Medicine, welcomed the graduates to a learned profession that is charged with creating new knowledge, passing it on to the next generation and keeping a code of ethics.

Melmed thanked Platt, Priselac and the Board of Directors for their "bold vision" in fostering the graduate program and praised two faculty leaders for shepherding it to success: Leon G. Fine, MB ChB, professor and vice dean, Research and Graduate Research Education, and chair of Biomedical Sciences; and David Underhill, PhD, professor and director of the graduate program and Janis and William Wetsman Family Chair in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

In his address, Rubenstein, an internationally prominent endocrinologist, reviewed the history of translational medicine, a relatively new discipline that gained traction in the 1980s after the biotechnology industry was established. The launch of the Human Genome Project, an ambitious 13-year effort to map human DNA, provided new impetus and increased federal funding in this area. The genome project was completed in 2003.

Today there are "tremendous opportunities" in translational medicine that Cedars-Sinai's graduate program, by exposing students to both scientists and physicians, is particularly well-suited to capitalize on, Rubenstein said. In reviewing research studies conducted by the 2013 graduating class, he added, "I was most impressed by their quality and potential impact on human disease."

Arthur H. Rubenstein, MB BCh, professor of medicine and dean emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine, delivers the commencement address.

Rubenstein reminded students that translational research is a team sport, requiring good communication across many disciplines. "No one person can succeed alone," he said.

After Rubenstein spoke, the seven graduates were presented with their degrees, to sustained applause. Kaplan, the Class of 2013 speaker, elicited another round of applause when she expressed gratitude for the love and support that friends and family members had shown the students. "For all the late nights, the missed dinners, the missed everything – thank you," she said.

By starting graduate school in a fledgling program, Kaplan added, she and her fellow students had been part of an experiment. "Although it's rare in science to have the first run of an experiment work, this first trial was a success," she said.

The final presentation at the commencement was the inaugural David L. Rimoin Teaching Excellence Award, named after the founder and director of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Genetics Institute who died in May 2012. Nominated by students, the recipients are faculty members regarded as inspirational teachers, Fine explained.

Because this year's voting yielded a tie, two teachers received the award: Lali K. Medina-Kauwe, PhD, associate professor in the departments of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, and Miklos Peterfy, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Medicine and director of the Laboratory of Murine Models for Metabolic Disease at the Medical Genetics Institute.

The Class of 2013 of the Cedars-Sinai Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and Translational Medicine (from left): Tamar Eigler, PhD, Maricel Gozo, PhD, Morgan Clond, PhD, Michelle Jones, PhD, Amber Kaplan, PhD, Jane Z. Kuo, PhD, and Akop Seksenyan, PhD.

Click the image below to see more photos from the commencement ceremony.

AHSP Wows First Patients at Opening

Richard Lewis, MD, checks on patient Girish Mody of South Africa at the new Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion on Tuesday, the day the Pavilion opened to patients.

The Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion opened to its first patients on Tuesday, and the 11-story, state-of-the-art facility didn't fail to impress.

Neurology patient Girish Mody summed up his initial impression of the AHSP as "wow."

Clinical staff members prepare for patients in the Pavilion.

Hector Villanueva (left) registers patient Gail Dunbar.

"What my wife and I found most impressive was the help we received navigating the building, from security at parking to the receptionist on the Plaza Level," said Mody, who flew in from South Africa for a consult with Richard Lewis, MD, director of the Electromyography Lab in the Department of Neurology. "Everyone was very personable, well informed and pleasant."

Gail Dunbar, a patient from Bakersfield, said she was impressed with the building's warm, friendly environment and with the amenities and services offered. Dunbar drove in for two procedures, including an echocardiogram.

"I thought the registration process went smoothly," she said while sitting with her husband in the waiting area for the Anesthesia Pre-Procedure Evaluation Center (APEC).

The Pavilion, which was licensed by the California Department of Public Health last week, is designed with a patient-centered focus to help make patient visits as easy and comfortable as possible. It can accommodate an estimated 1,900 patients, visitors and staff per day. In addition, its shared spaces and open lab concepts are designed to bring clinicians and researchers together to promote collaboration and advance the development of major medical breakthroughs.

Patrick Lyden, MD, chair of the Department of Neurology, said that because the building is so large, it can seem overwhelming at first glance. However, he said, things seem to be going well.

"When you think about how complex this building is, and how complicated scheduling is, it's amazing we're at this stage that we are in this building. We're ahead of schedule," Lyden said. "I always feel like it's a privilege to come to work at Cedars-Sinai, but to come to work in this facility, it's humbling to the 10th power."

The Pavilion contains 440,000 square feet of program space, as well as 380,000 square feet of parking space on five levels. It also features the 50,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art Sue and Bill Gross Surgery and Procedure Center on the fifth level, which serves as the new home for outpatient and a.m.-admit orthopedics patients. The first procedures are scheduled for this Friday, June 21.

New Procedure Center Goes Operational With First Surgery

A hip replacement surgery on June 21 was the first procedure performed in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion.

Debra Hambleton left Cedars-Sinai recently with a new right hip – and the honor of being the first patient to undergo surgery in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion.

Debra Hambleton of Oxnard (with Ellie Mowbray, RN, before her surgery) was taken into Operating Room 7 at 7:30 a.m..

Hambleton, who lives in Oxnard, had her right hip replaced on Friday, June 21, in Operating Room 7, on the fifth level of the Pavilion in the Sue and Bill Gross Surgery and Procedure Center. Hambleton was taken into the OR at 7:30 a.m. by a team led by Cedars-Sinai Medical Group orthopedic surgeon Robert C. Klapper, MD, who performed a total of six surgeries that day. Down the hall, neurosurgeon Michael J. Alexander, MD, began his first procedure in the outpatient Neurointerventional suite at 8 a.m.

"The new building is beautiful, and the pre-op area seems much more spacious than in the medical center, but it's the people here who make it special," said Hambleton as she prepared to be discharged from her hospital room in the main medical center, two days after her surgery. "Everyone has been so wonderful, and I feel good, although I'm looking forward to sleeping in my own bed."

The 50,000-square-foot Procedure Center features eight general surgical rooms and serves as the new home for outpatient and a.m.-admit Orthopedics patients. In addition, it features two interventional radiology rooms and two cardiac cath labs. The cath labs are expected to open in a few months, pending regulatory approvals.

Robert C. Klapper, MD, performed six surgeries on June 21, including Debra Hambleton's hip replacement.

"It's a tremendous honor to take my team from the main OR to the Pavilion and be the first to operate here," said Klapper, who is director of the Joint Replacement Program at Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center. "The staff has been remarkable, including Jan Decker, Kyung Jun and Donna Aiello. You can just feel the love and passion of everyone involved in making this project a success, starting from the top down."

With the opening of the Procedure Center, orthopedists have vacated a large percentage of the space on OR 7 in the medical center and in the 310 Building. While there will still be orthopedic cases remaining on 7 OR, these will primarily be limited to patients who are already inpatients and to orthopedic trauma and pediatric orthopedic spine cases. In addition, nonorthopedic outpatient surgeries at the 310 Building are being consolidated onto the first floor.

By Treating Open Wounds, Podiatrists Help Preserve Limbs

By Kazu Suzuki, DPM, CWS
and Jeffrey A. Klemes, DPM

Many practitioners consult podiatrists to fix a bunion, straighten a crooked toe, help the runner with heel pain, treat a sprained ankle, fix a broken bone, or treat the stubborn, infected ingrown toenail.

But podiatrists also preserve toes, feet and limbs through their tireless work with wound care, amputation prevention and limb salvage. This is the area where podiatrists are truly integrated in the multidisciplinary team approach, working hand in hand with internists, endocrinologists, infectious disease, vascular and plastic surgery to help optimize diabetic control, unplug or bypass diseased arteries, choose the optimal antibiotic, or apply the rotational or skin graft.

From the beginning of time, mankind has been troubled by open wounds. An Egyptian papyrus scroll (B.C. 580) says that "open wounds shall be treated with a mixture of honey, grease and lint." In modern surgical history, open wounds have been treated with "wet to dry" saline gauze dressings. Did you know this is now passé? The concept of "moist wound healing" was discovered in the 1970s when an animal study found that a moist wound heals more quickly than a dry one.

Fast forward to 2013, and there are a few thousand high-tech wound dressings available. With the sole purpose of healing the wound as quickly as possible, we also utilize "advanced wound care" products, including bioengineered human skin grafts (created from neonatal foreskin cells) and a recombinant PDGF human growth factor gels.

In our wound care center, a typical patient is scanned with a laser Doppler device to measure his or her skin perfusion pressure, a prediction of the patient's ability to heal. Next, the wound is cleaned with a low-frequency ultrasound debridement device that disinfects the wound bed. This wound may be dressed with a nano-silver-based antimicrobial dressing and multilayer compression bandages. A wound VAC suction device may be incorporated for large or deep tissue defects. If osteomyelitis, radiation injury or deep diabetic foot ulcers (Wagner grade 3 or 4) are present, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is recommended. Once the wound heals, we prescribe custom-molded shoe gear as well as physical therapy to prevent recurrence.

We always aim for the fastest wound closure for preservation of the limb. After a leg amputation, a patient becomes bed-ridden, which often results in formation of pressure ulcers, deterioration of cardiovascular function and premature death. Statistics show that the five-year mortality rate of diabetes mellitus patients after leg amputations is as high as 80 percent, rivaling that of stage four lung cancer or pancreatic cancer.

"Limb preservation" is a treatment concept to preserve the lower legs and the ability to ambulate, and it takes aggressive screening and treatment of peripheral arterial disease, open wounds, and osteomyelitis that may affect limb survival. As a specialist of lower extremity diseases, a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM) is uniquely trained to treat any foot and ankle disorders, including complex open wounds and osteomyelitis.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center has a three-year Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Residency Program. Our residents are at the front line, being consulted for diabetic foot wounds and infections, supervised by attending surgeons in the Podiatric Surgery Division of the Department of Surgery.

Kazu Suzuki is an ABWM board-certified wound care specialist at Tower Wound Care Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Towers. He can be reached at Kazu.Suzuki@cshs.org.

Jeffrey A. Klemes is certified by ACFAS and is director of the Cedars-Sinai Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Residency Program. He can be reached at Jeffrey.Klemes@cshs.org.

A limb-threatening, infected DM leg ulcer

A healed leg ulcer after wound debridement, skin grafting and wound VAC application

Surgical Fellows Announced

Eighteen doctors have been chosen as the 2013-14 incoming surgical fellows at Cedars-Sinai. Listed under their Cedars-Sinai programs, they are:

Advanced Laparoscopic, Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery — Miguel Burch, MD, program director

  • Allison Barrett, general surgery resident, New York University of Medicine
  • Michel Dias, general surgery resident, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Breast Oncology — Armando Giuliano, MD, program director

  • Maria Nelson, general surgery resident, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital
  • Sharon Noori, general surgery resident, Orlando Regional Medical Center

Colon/Rectal Surgery — Phillip Fleshner, MD, program director

  • Karen Zaghiyan, general surgery resident, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Surgical Critical Care — Eric Ley, MD, program director

  • Galinos Barmparas, general surgery resident, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
  • Taryne Imai, fellow, cardiothoracic surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; general surgery resident, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
  • Jonathan Lu, general surgery resident, Loma Linda University

Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery — Robert McKenna, MD, program director

  • Raphael Lui, attending, Guangdong Provincial Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Province, China
  • Kelly Nagasawa, fellow, cardiothoracic surgery, University of Utah; general surgery resident, University of Hawaii

Minimally Invasive Urology — Gerhard Fuchs, MD, program director

  • Donald Hannoun, urology resident, University of Southern California
  • Vikrant Uberoi, urology resident, Boston Medical Center

Orthopedic Trauma — Donald Wiss, MD, program director

  • Carol Lin, orthopedic surgery resident, University of California, San Francisco

Spinal Disorders — Theodore Goldstein, MD, program director

  • Antonio Romero, orthopedic surgery resident, University of Southern California
  • Ashley Simela, orthopedic surgery resident, University Hospitals

Cardio-Thoracic Surgery — Wen Cheng, MD, program director

  • Joshua Chung, general surgery resident, Riverside Methodist Hospitals (Ohio Health)
  • Mohiuddin Cheema, attending, Hartford Hospital Non-Invasive Vascular Lab, Hartford, Conn.; fellow, vascular surgery, Albany Medical Center

Abdominal Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Surgery — Steven Colquhoun, MD, program director

  • Vladimir Donchev, general surgery resident, Harlem Hospital Center

Circle of Friends Honorees for May

The Circle of Friends program honored 137 people in May.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Bessie Adams
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Daniel C. Allison, MD
  • Marlene A. Alves, RN
  • Mahul B. Amin, MD
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Beverly A. Barlongo, RNC, BSN
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Michael Brousseau, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Molly M. Burger, RN
  • David S. Cannom, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Wen Cheng, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Leonard H. Coaston
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • J. Louis Cohen, MD
  • Lawrence J. Cohen, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Rick B. Delamarter, MD
  • Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD
  • Kristine Devera, RN
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Marla C. Dubinsky, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Yaron Elad, MD
  • Jonathan C. Ellis, MD
  • Clarke D. Espy, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Jeannifer W. Estrada, RN
  • Debra K. Evans
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Margaret R. Farrell, RN, BSN
  • Morton H. Field, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • David M. Frisch, MD
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Seda M. Gharapetian, RN
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Ora K. Gordon, MD
  • Rafael O. Grefaldeo
  • Victor Gura, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Behrooz Hakimian, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Fernando P. Hernandez
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Terri Holliday, RN
  • Josephine A. Imperial
  • Mariko L. Ishimori, MD
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Adam D. Karns, MD
  • Harold L. Karpman, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Mehran J. Khorsandi, MD
  • Joan C. Kirschner, RN, MSN, ANP-BC
  • Charles F. Kivowitz, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Mykel V. LeCheminant, RN, BSN
  • Nanette Leonardo, RN
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD
  • Keren Lerner, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Sheryl Lewin, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Cheryle C. Maano-Requejo
  • Laila C. Madi, RN
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • William J. Mandel, MD
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Mary Katharine McCormick, RN
  • Robert J. McKenna, Jr., MD
  • Leslie Memsic, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Peggy B. Miles, MD
  • Steven A. Miles, MD
  • Sarah Miller, RN, BSN
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Betty Nersesian, RN
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Margaret H. Ochner, MD
  • Sara Oliva, RN, BSN, OCN
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Brian Perri, MD, DO
  • Edward H. Phillips, Jr., MD
  • Joanne Pileggi, RN, MSN, NE-BC
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Linda Piponniau, RN, BSN
  • Irving Posalski, MD
  • John F. Reinisch, MD
  • Stacey P. Rosenbaum, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Paul A. Rudnick, MD
  • Sutha Sachar, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • John L. Sherman, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • David S. Silver, MD
  • Jason Snibbe, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Lenore M. Strum, RNC
  • Anita P. Sumen, MD
  • Kazu Suzuki, DPM
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Lynn Ulrichsen
  • Marina Vaysburd, MD
  • Jae Jae Velazquez
  • Alan Weinberger, MD
  • Michael H. Weisman, MD
  • Matthew D. Williams, RN, BSN, CCRN
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Lauren N. Wood, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Robin T. Yuan, MD
  • Evan M. Zahn, MD
  • Millard H. Zisser, MD

Weingarten Named Chief Clinical Transformation Officer

Scott Weingarten, MD, has been appointed to the new position of senior vice president and chief clinical transformation officer.

"This new position reflects our commitment to achieve the same best-in-class performance in clinical efficiency throughout the health system, as we have demonstrated in quality and safety," said Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO.

Weingarten's new responsibilities span clinical services across the medical center and the Medical Network. He will lead the development and execution of strategies and innovations in accountable care and clinical efficiency.

Working closely with Glenn D. Braunstein, MD, vice president for Clinical Innovation, Steve Deutsch, MD, medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, and the other clinical leaders in the Medical Network and the medical center, Weingarten will help lead efforts to engage the entire Cedars-Sinai physician community and other members of the clinical care team in the development and implementation of clinical best practices and clinical efficiency. He will specifically lead efforts focusing on the total cost of care and population health management. He will also serve as lead physician in working with other provider organizations and health plan relationships as they evolve.

Weingarten will report directly to Priselac and will collaborate closely with Michael Langberg, MD, senior vice president and chief medical officer, Tom Gordon, senior vice president and CEO of the Medical Network, Mark Gavens, senior vice president and chief operating officer, and Rick Jacobs, senior vice president and chief strategy officer.

Weingarten will also lead Cedars-Sinai's efforts in health services research, the field of study that examines how people get access to health care, how much care costs, and what happens to patients as a result of this care. For these efforts, he will collaborate with Shlomo Melmed, MD, senior vice president and chief academic officer, and Cedars-Sinai physicians from the faculty, private practice and the Medical Network. "As with other aspects of our research enterprise and the focus on translational research, linking our health services research with our clinical practice will enhance the effectiveness of both," Priselac said.

Weingarten brings to the new position a unique set of clinical, academic and executive knowledge, skills and experience. He has been a national leader in clinical care for many years, has a deep understanding of clinical processes and clinical delivery systems at healthcare provider organizations across the country, and has been at the forefront of clinical efficiency and clinical decision support. He has been affiliated with Cedars-Sinai for 30 years, and is a member of the medical staff.

Weingarten co-founded and was president and CEO of Zynx Health for more than 16 years. Zynx Health supplies clinical decision support products to approximately 2,000 hospitals in the United States Zynx, which was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the "Best Places to Work in Healthcare," is one of the Hearst Corporation's largest companies and has been one of Hearst's fastest-growing companies under Weingarten's leadership.

Weingarten has published approximately 100 articles and is the co-inventor of two patents.