sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY April 2014 | Archived Issues

Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

» Read more


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF link below to see the Department of Surgery's education schedule for April.

Education Calendar - April (PDF)


Surgery Scheduling - New Hours as of May 1

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling. As of May 1, hours of operation will be Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

» Read more

Excellent Residency Programs Raise Important Questions

Message From the Chair

Two weeks ago, the Department of Surgery completed its recruitment of residents in our primary certificate residency programs. All three residencies (General Surgery, Orthopedics and Urology) matched high on our lists with outstanding medical students from some of the best medical schools in the country.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Designing 'Operating Room of the Future'

Partnership With Military Aims to Streamline, Improve Trauma Care

Cedars-Sinai has partnered with the U.S. military to design the "operating room of the future" that will enable emergency medical teams to respond more quickly and effectively to patients with life-threatening injuries. The project is called "OR 360."

» Read more

Match Program Brings 11 New Residents to Surgery

The Department of Surgery has matched its top applicants in General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Urology and Podiatry. These students are among the brightest to join Cedars-Sinai, with the highest average scores on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination®, along with superior letters of recommendation, research and extracurricular talents.

» See the names and photos of the new residents

New Program Eases Children's Fecal Incontinence

Families of children who suffer from fecal incontinence, a condition that causes embarrassment and often hinders social and emotional development, can seek help from Cedars-Sinai's new Pediatric Bowel Management Program in the Division of Pediatric Surgery.

» Read more

Ramzy Named Lung Transplant Surgical Director

Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD, has been appointed surgical director of the Cedars-Sinai Lung Transplant Program. Ramzy joined Cedars-Sinai in 2011, and he directs the medical center's Extracorporeal Life Support Program. He is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

 

» Read more

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event. The debate will convene for its 11th year on Friday, June 6.


 

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Quickly See Patient Classification

To quickly view a patient's hospital classification in CS-Link™, you can add a column called "Class" to his or her "My Patient List."

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for March

The Circle of Friends program honored 165 people in March. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee Approvals

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights from the Feb. 4 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee.

» Read more

Flu 'Badge Buddies' No Longer Needed

Thank you for all the efforts this winter season helping keep our patients, visitors and fellow staff safe. The medical center is no longer requiring the green and orange flu ID badge accessories to be worn. In addition, unvaccinated personnel will no longer have to wear isolation masks.

» Read more

Excellent Residency Programs Raise Important Questions

Message From the Chair

Two weeks ago, the Department of Surgery completed its recruitment of residents in our primary certificate residency programs. All three residencies (General Surgery, Orthopedics and Urology) matched high on our lists with outstanding medical students from some of the best medical schools in the country.

The applicants to the three programs have much in common. For one, they represent all regions of the United States; Cedars-Sinai educational programs are certainly not regional recruiters. The number of applications for each program maintained the remarkable volume we have seen over the last three years.

Somewhere between 25 percent and 35 percent of all U.S. medical students interested in the three disciplines apply to our programs; each program received more than 600 applications for the two (Urology) or four slots (General Surgery and Orthopedics).

Related story in this issue

Match Program Brings 11 New Residents to Surgery

Finally, and most importantly, the quality of the applicants continues to improve. Virtually all have achieved honors in their clinical rotations, and a sizable number are inductees into the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor societies at the schools. Most have done substantial and original academic work with a record of publication in major medical journals. It is now a cliché when our physician interviewers conclude (perhaps inaccurately) that "I would never have matched here now!"

While our residency programs remain very strong, there are a number of key decisions we need to make in the coming years. It is our responsibility to ensure that our trainees, many interested in academic careers, will have access to a sufficiently broad and challenging case load as well as the clinical or basic research opportunities they desire. Some of the issues we will need to consider are:

  • How will we provide off-site rotations, when needed, to enrich their clinical experience (such as the current affiliation in both General Surgery and Orthopedics with Children's Hospital of Los Angeles)?
  • Where will we obtain consistent funding for up to two research years (both on-site and off-site) for some residents?
  • What are the correct sizes for our related fellowship programs, which are essential to our care delivery and national reputation but have the potential to compete for resources with our primary certificate programs?
  • How can we adapt to the new paradigms of real-time competency-based evaluation of each trainee, which requires extensive attending engagement?

As is often said, these represent the classic "good problems to have" since they reflect the growing stature and numerical strength of our training programs, which are a continuing source of pride for all physicians in the department.

When the department listed its goals across the divisions in an Ojai conference of all types of attendings in 2006, the first was establishing the best training programs in the region with strong national reputations. In our long-standing General Surgery program and in the remarkable and successful startups in Urology and Orthopedics, it would appear we have met our goal. I am personally quite confident we can likewise figure out a way to sustain the mission.

Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
H and S Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery
Chair, Department of Surgery
Vice President, Interventional Services
Vice Dean, Academic Affairs

Cedars-Sinai Designing 'Operating Room of the Future'

Cedars-Sinai surgeons train on a mannequin during an OR 360 trauma simulation in February.

Partnership With Military Aims to Streamline, Improve Trauma Care

Cedars-Sinai has partnered with the U.S. military to design the "operating room of the future" that will enable emergency medical teams to respond more quickly and effectively to patients with life-threatening injuries.

Under the project, called "OR 360," research teams have reconfigured the operating room with movable walls and equipment for more flexible use, identified ways to eliminate disruptions during surgery, and developed an iPhone® app that provides diagnostic information about blood pressure and other vital signs before patients arrive in the emergency room.

OR 360 in the News

More than 430 media outlets across the nation, including the New York Times, featured an Associated Press story about OR 360.

Among those that picked up the story were Bloomberg Businessweek and Yahoo! Health.

Several outlets also ran an AP photo gallery of a recent trauma simulation and an accompanying video on YouTube.

Los Angeles' local ABC station also covered the story.

The initiative, drawing on practices from surgery, psychology, aviation and other disciplines, focuses on addressing potential breakdowns in the coordination of trauma care during the so-called "golden hour," when prompt medical attention can mean the difference between life and death.

"Our goal is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of acute trauma care in both civilian and military settings by introducing innovations in communication, technology, workflows and the way medical personnel perform their jobs," said Bruce L. Gewertz, MD, surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery at Cedars-Sinai, who also holds the Harriet and Steven Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery. "The quicker we get patients cared for, the better the outcomes."

Physicians from Cedars-Sinai and military hospitals on two continents, along with researchers from several universities, have analyzed the complex processes of trauma care — from the moment a doctor's pager is triggered to the time a patient arrives in a trauma bay to the patient's transfer to an intensive care unit.

The aim of this research has been to find ways to simplify the time-pressured nature of trauma care. Gewertz said that means improving communication and teamwork among medical staff, making better use of technology and re-engineering the operating room so that bulky equipment pivots effortlessly around surgical teams rather than cluttering work spaces.

The trauma drill took place in a simulated operating room, designed by Cedars-Sinai researchers, that features flexible, moving walls and pieces of equipment attached to ceiling tracks that pivot around surgical teams.

OR 360 has been funded by $3.8 million in grants from the U.S. Department of Defense. Cedars-Sinai has collaborated with personnel at military medical centers in the United States and Europe.

Important partners in these efforts have included faculty members from the University of Washington, University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Central Florida. Private sector representatives have come from Coolfire Solutions, a mobile application developer in St. Louis, and the Surgical Safety Institute, a consulting firm in Tampa, Fla., that applies aviation safety techniques to the operating room.

Members of this wide-ranging team have based their work on "human factors" research to evaluate the interplay of teamwork and technology, as well as operating room culture and workspaces, among other things.

This analysis has zeroed in on "surgical flow disruptions" — such as missing equipment, tangled IV tubes, extraneous conversations and delays in getting specialists or interpreters to the operating room — that can interrupt or slow the work of surgical teams. A broad body of research has found a direct link between flow disruptions in the operating room and surgical errors.

To learn how military hospitals avoid these types of disruptions, members of the Cedars-Sinai team visited military surgical teams in the U.S. and Europe to observe their practices and to interview surgeons, nurses and other medical personnel. Team members took away important lessons about standardizing the setup of trauma bays and how to better use technology in the operating room.

"The quicker we get patients cared for, the better the outcomes," said Bruce L. Gewertz, MD, surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery at Cedars-Sinai.

As an outgrowth of the visits and subsequent research, Cedars-Sinai has introduced several of its own innovations to streamline trauma care, including:

  • Creating color-coded trauma bays, allowing staffers to more quickly locate supplies and equipment.
  • Installing whiteboards in trauma bays that display key patient information such as age, gender, pre-hospital vital signs and field treatment, providing important facts as trauma teams respond to fluid situations.
  • Developing an iPhone application that puts patient diagnostic data at the fingertips of surgeons, nurses, pharmacists and other trauma team members as they converge on a case from different parts of the medical center.
  • Conducting pre-briefings in trauma bays before trauma patients arrive, allowing doctors, nurses and others to understand their roles and to ensure that the correct equipment and medications are ready.

These changes have produced promising early results.

The whiteboards and pre-briefings, for example, reduced the time to capture the first radiological images by more than 10 percent and the time to draw blood for the first lab tests by more than 20 percent. The standardized, color-coded trauma bays reduced the time needed to collect supplies by about 15 percent.

Cedars-Sinai researchers also are evaluating ways to reduce delays and errors during handoffs, when patients are transferred from one medical space to another (for example, from the operating room to an intensive care unit). And they have designed and built a simulated operating room that features flexible, moving walls and pieces of equipment attached to ceiling tracks that pivot around surgical teams. The lab fosters creative solutions to complex logistical challenges in the operating room.

"This is a new way to think about the improvement and delivery of healthcare," Ken Catchpole, PhD, director of Surgical Safety and Human Factors Research at Cedars-Sinai, said of the overall project. "It's not just about new techniques or technologies or drugs, but how all those things work in unison. By putting the patients and clinicians at the center of the system and designing everything directly for their needs, we can develop trauma care for the 21st century that is fast, efficient, safe and of the highest quality possible."

The initiative was supported by a contract that was awarded by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and managed by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center under Award Nos. W81XWH1011039 and W81XWH1110813.

The simulated operating room fosters creative solutions to complex logistical challenges.

Match Program Brings 11 New Residents to Surgery

The Department of Surgery has matched its top applicants in General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Urology and Podiatry.

These students are among the brightest to join Cedars-Sinai, with the highest average scores on the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination®, along with superior letters of recommendation, research and extracurricular talents.

They will begin their internship training in late June.

The new Surgery residents are:

General Surgery

Jerald Borgella
Keck School of Medicine, USC

Emily Siegel
Keck School of Medicine, USC

Joshua Tseng
Keck School of Medicine, USC

Halley Vora
Temple University

Orthopedic Surgery

John Garlich
University of Kansas School of Medicine

Erin Haggerty
Keck School of Medicine, USC

Max Michalski
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine

Zachary NaPier
George Washington University School of Medicine

Urology

Justin Houman
University of Rochester School of Medicine

Devin Patel
George Washington University

Podiatry

Ramer Younan
Western University College of Podiatric Medicine

Related story in this issue: Excellent Residency Programs Raise Important Questions

New Program Eases Children's Fecal Incontinence

"It's clear there's a tremendous need in this area," said Philip Frykman, MD, PhD, associate director of Pediatric Surgery at Cedars-Sinai.

Families of children who suffer from fecal incontinence, a condition that causes embarrassment and often hinders social and emotional development, can seek help from Cedars-Sinai's new Pediatric Bowel Management Program in the Division of Pediatric Surgery part of the Maxine Dunitz Children's Health Center.

Using an interdisciplinary approach of treatment, medication and behavior modification techniques, the program has seen a success rate of 90 percent in helping patients manage fecal incontinence.

"We want to improve the quality of life for these children, and for the families of these children," said Philip Frykman, MD, PhD, associate director of Pediatric Surgery at Cedars-Sinai.

The most surprising part of creating the program was learning it is the only one of its kind in California, Frykman said.

Most children with fecal incontinence suffer from colorectal problems, anorectal malformations or Hirschsprung's disease, a condition in which nerve cells in the intestines are missing. Some children with anorectal malformations that have been surgically repaired lack the muscle tone for successful sphincter control. Others can't feel the physical cues that a bowel movement is imminent.

For infants and toddlers in diapers, the inability to control the passage of stool or flatus is not a problem. But for older children, fecal incontinence causes them to continue to soil their clothing, even as their peers have become toilet trained, Frykman said.

"Often when parents start noticing the problem is when the children are entering into preschool," Frykman said. "The parents are unable to get their children toilet trained, and may not know that there is a place they can get help."

Children at the Pediatric Bowel Management Program go through an initial evaluation process. The physicians and nurses examine the patients' medical records, do X-ray studies and examine the patient under anesthesia. Based on the results of the evaluations, the team creates a treatment program.

"Kids with repaired anorectal malformation often don't have much sphincter function, so they are managed with enemas," Frykman said. "It may take a little while to adjust to it, but it's very successful among the patients who are compliant. The kids will have one bowel movement per day, and they are in underwear instead of diapers."

Among the patients with a successful outcome in the Pediatric Bowel Management Program was 7-year-old Ella Slezak, who was born with spina bifida. Due to congenital nerve damage in the lower end of the spinal cord, children with spina bifida lack the muscle tone needed for peristalsis and are unable to control their internal and external anal sphincters.

Because she was unable to control her bowels, Ella was chronically constipated, her abdomen was distended, and she was often in a great deal of discomfort.

Ella's mother, Lynn Kataoka, wanted a better quality of life for her daughter, so she made an appointment with Frykman. After Frykman and his team conducted physical exams and a series of tests on Ella, Lynn Kataoka elected to have Ella undergo a Malone antegrade continence enema, or MACE.

In the procedure, the surgeon uses the patient's appendix to create a passageway between the colon and the skin of the abdomen. A catheter is then threaded through the stoma, and saline and other fluids are used to flush the bowel via the abdomen rather than the rectum.

The daily procedure, which requires Ella to sit on the toilet for about an hour as it is performed, results in regular bowel movements, Lynn Kataoka said. Ella also has a catheter in her urethra several times each day to void her urine. For the first time in her life, Ella is wearing underwear like her peers, instead of diapers.

"The surgery has been life-changing for all of us," Kataoka said.

For Frykman, the most surprising part of creating the Pediatric Bowel Management Program has been learning that it is the only one of its kind in California.

"The astonishing thing to me is that there are techniques and approaches to manage these kids, but using medications and enemas isn't well-applied across the board," Frykman said. "So when I'm seeing not just my own patients, but those from other hospitals, it's clear there's a tremendous need in this area."

Patients are coming to the new program through physician referrals and word-of-mouth from parents.

"Mothers are talking about the program, and they're blogging about it," Frykman said. "The resource they need is finally available."

Ramzy Named Lung Transplant Surgical Director

Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD, has been appointed surgical director of the Cedars-Sinai Lung Transplant Program. He takes over for Wen Cheng, MD, who has played a pivotal role in Ramzy's mentorship and will continue to provide valuable surgical expertise and support to the program.

Ramzy joined Cedars-Sinai in 2011, and he directs the medical center's Extracorporeal Life Support Program. He is a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

Ramzy attended medical school at the University of Toronto, where he also completed a general surgery residency and obtained his PhD. After his cardiothoracic surgery residency at the University of Pennsylvania, Ramzy sought additional training as a fellow in Transplant and Medical Assist Devices as well as Advanced Aortic Surgery.

His appointment was announced by Andrew Klein, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center.

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Leon Morgenstern, MD

The Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition committee is soliciting suggestions for a topic for this annual event.

The debate will convene for its 11th year on Friday, June 6, at 8 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium. It will anchor the first Cedars-Sinai Founder's Day — a daylong celebration of the opening of the medical center on June 6, 1976.

Topics for the debate should appeal to a wide cross section of the medical center. Send suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, at leo.gordon@cshs.org. Residents interested in participating in the debate should contact Gordon.

There are cash prizes for:

  • The resident who submits the selected topic
  • The resident who wins the debate
  • The resident who is the runner-up

To see coverage of last year's debate, click here.

CS-Link Tip: Quickly See Patient Classification

To quickly view a patient's hospital classification in CS-Link™, you can add a column called "Class" to his or her "My Patient List."

Right-click on the current My Patient List, click Properties, identify Class as an available column and add it to your already-selected columns. This will allow you to identify at a glance if your patients have observation (OBS) or inpatient (IP) status.

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians. And check out the CS-Link tip in each issue of Medical Staff Pulse.

Circle of Friends Honorees for March

The Circle of Friends program honored 165 people in March.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Jamil Ahmed
  • Kaelian L. Aldrich, RN
  • Carolyn J. Alexander, MD
  • Howard N. Allen, MD
  • Daniel C. Allison, MD
  • Angel S. Amador
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • Ellen Anifantis, LCSW
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Eli M. Baron, MD
  • Shakyla Bates, RN
  • Martin "Marty" Bender
  • Selvyn B. Bleifer, MD
  • Mary Grace Brandon, RN, ACNP-BC
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Eileen G. Brown, RN, OCN
  • Cecilia Bruce
  • Mary J. Campagne, RN
  • James L. Caplan, MD
  • Erin L. Carr, RN, BSN, OCN
  • Lisa Cassileth, MD
  • Lucila T. Castro, RN
  • Christine R. Cespedes
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Gerald E. Connell
  • Maria S. Corral
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Nicole Cutidioc, RN, BSN
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Dudley S. Danoff, MD
  • Rick B. Delamarter, MD
  • Stephen C. Deutsch, MD
  • Kylan M. Dhembi, RN, BSN
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Sherry Duarte, RN-BC, BSN
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Mary Ruth Ewell, LMFT
  • Mary Annalee C. Famas, BSN
  • Margaret R. Farrell, RN, BSN
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • Kristi M. Funk, MD
  • Steven S. Galen, MD
  • Avrom Gart, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Mark O. Goodarzi, MD
  • Kapil Gupta, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Jason S. Hamilton, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Jeremy R. Herman, MD
  • Stuart Holden, MD
  • Jethro L. Hu, MD
  • Martha A. Hurtado, RN, BSN
  • Maria Liza S. Inductivo, RN, BSN
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Sari A. Juwono, RN, MSN, PCCN
  • Marshall L. Kadner, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila M. Kar, MD
  • Olivier A. Kassimo, RN
  • Brenda L. Kearney, RN
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Brent A. Kohler, RN
  • Penelope Grace Kornbluth, MSN, ANP, APRN-BC
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Joseph Loewy, MD
  • Arthur S. Longboy
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Lourdes G. Manalac
  • Neel K. Mann, MD
  • Ani Mardirossian, RN, BSN
  • Blanca S. Martinez
  • Behnam David Massaband, DPM
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Leslie Memsic, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Rolito A. Mintac
  • Leilani D. Miranda, RN, BSN
  • Lastenia Carmen D. Moreno Esquer
  • Hattie M. Munn
  • Kevin M. Nagengast, PharmD
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Youram Nassir, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Daniel Neri
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Margaret Leah Wanjiru Ngure, RN, MSN
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Onyebuchi "Michael" Nwosu, RN
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Chirag G. Patil, MD
  • Brian Perri, DO
  • Cheri Phillips, MPA-C
  • Edward H. Phillips Jr., MD
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Linda Piponniau, BSN
  • Kristina C. Pulliam, RN, BSN
  • Florian Rader, MD
  • Bobbie J. Rimel, MD
  • Tiffany A. Ringo, RN
  • Eileen M. Rodriguez, MSN, RN
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Jenna Rush, RN, MSN, CCTC
  • Amy S. Rutman, MD
  • Ritchie Salinas, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Enrique Sanchez
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Lora F. Schallert, RNC
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Jessica L. Schneider, MD
  • Scott Serden, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Rimma Shvarts, RN, BSN
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Suzanne Silverstein, MA, ATR
  • Charles F. Simmons, MD
  • Richard Sokolov, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Meir Jonathon Solnik, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Adam V. Sutton, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Amabelle G. Talavera
  • Shahin G. Thomas, RN
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Janessa Tiu, RN
  • Stephen P. Townsend, RN, BSN
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Conrad J. Tseng, MD
  • Stefan A. Unterhalter, MD
  • Nicole B. Veis Schwartz, RN
  • Irina Vinogradova, RN, BSN, PHN
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Michael H. Weisman, MD
  • Mark A. Weissman, DPM
  • Karis Jayne Welbourn, RN, MSN, PCCN
  • Maria Fe M. White, RN, MSN, NP, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC
  • Charles Williams
  • Teresita T. Williams
  • Joanna L. Wilson, RN-BC, OCN
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Matthew T. Woodard, RN, BSN, CCRN

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee Approvals

Pharmacy Focus

Highlights of the Feb. 4 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee are summarized in the PDF link below.

P and T Committee Approvals - Feb. 4 (PDF)

Flu 'Badge Buddies' No Longer Needed

Thank you for all the efforts this winter season helping keep our patients, visitors and fellow staff safe.

The medical center is no longer requiring the green and orange flu ID badge accessories to be worn. In addition, unvaccinated personnel will no longer have to wear isolation masks.

Badges should be discarded in a blue recycling bin or a regular trash container as they cannot be used again next season.

Influenza activity in Los Angeles County continues to decline, with a positive influenza rate of only 2.9 percent being reported by area laboratories to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health as of March 14. At the peak of the season, an estimated 27 percent of people admitted to Los Angeles County emergency departments with influenza-like illness tested positive for the flu.

Typically, influenza season begins in the fall and ends March 31.