sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY August 2014 | Archived Issues

P and T Approvals, Tramadol Change, Warnings About Promacta and Sporanox

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the June 3 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, tramadol is now being managed as a controlled substance, and the federal government has released a warning about Promacta and a list of contraindications for Sporanox.

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Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

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Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF link below to see the Department of Surgery's educational schedule.

Educational Schedule - August 2014 (PDF)


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

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Trial of Bioartificial Liver Underway

There has been a decades-long quest on the part of many to develop just that: a device that can, at least temporarily, fill in for the function of the liver. With such a machine, one could bridge patients with acute failure to recovery, or support those with chronic failure through the long wait to a newly transplanted organ. Steven D. Colquhoun, MD, and the Liver Transplantation team are participating in a multicenter trial of a new bioartificial liver for the treatment of patients with acute liver failure.

» Read more

New Outpatient Transplant Center to Open Soon

Transplant physicians are preparing to see patients in Cedars-Sinai's new Comprehensive Transplant Center outpatient facility shortly after Labor Day. "This facility represents such a huge benefit to our transplant patients, who will now have access to all of their transplant physicians and many of their support services in one location," said Andrew S. Klein, MD, director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center.

» Read more

Breaking Barriers in Reconstructive Surgery

By Randy Sherman, MD

A curious face appeared in last month's GQ magazine. Richard Norris had not created a new clothing line, signed a multimillion-dollar professional sports contract or even appeared on any Broadway stage or silver screen. To the contrary, he lived the life of a shut-in for 15 long years, until he participated in one of the most remarkable surgical feats of all time. In 2012, he became the recipient of the most extensive full-face transplant to date.

» Read more

Patient's Gift Will Support Sarcoma Study

A gift of $250,000 for the Surgical Oncology Education and Research Fund in honor of Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, (right) was recently received from a grateful patient. The gift will be used to support the ongoing genomic analysis of patients with multiple primary malignancies and sarcomas.

 

» Read more

Third-Year Students Enjoy Hands-on Training

Third-year medical students from UCLA rotate year-round through all fields in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. This past year, the directorship of the UCLA program was transitioned to Nicolas Melo, MD, and Alan Pierce, the new course director.

» Read more

Dental Residency Program Provides Care to the Community

After a one-year hiatus, the Cedars-Sinai Hospital Dental Residency program has reopened with four new residents and a slightly expanded scope, co-directors Irving Lebovics, DDS, and Denis Weintraub, DDS, announced.

» Read more

Resident Credits Great Teaching in Car-Crash Response

Danielle Thomas, MD, had no idea that a drive to her parents in San Diego would suddenly lead to a chance to use her training from the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Surgery Residency program. But that's what happened, as she found herself leaping into action at the scene of a car crash.

» Read more

Vo Honored for Kidney Transplant Work

Ashley Anh Vo, PharmD, administrative director of the Transplant Immunotherapy Program at the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center, has been named the 2014 Clinician of Distinction by the American Society of Transplantation for her work in developing anti-rejection drug protocols for patients.

 

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for July

The Circle of Friends program honored 131 people in July. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Trial of Bioartificial Liver Underway

When kidneys fail we turn to dialysis as renal-replacement therapy. Why not the liver? When patients present with various forms of acute or chronic liver failure, the need for a "liver dialysis" equivalent has long held an intuitive appeal.

Steven D. Colquhoun, MD

In fact, there has been a decades-long quest on the part of many to develop just that: a device that can, at least temporarily, fill in for the function of the liver. With such a machine, one could bridge patients with acute failure to recovery, or support those with chronic failure through the long wait to a newly transplanted organ.

Unfortunately, the tasks of the liver are incredibly complex, and a successful apparatus would need to provide both detoxification and protein synthetic functions. Accordingly, the use of living cells has been the focus of several prior attempts. In fact, as many may recall, the research interests of the Department of Surgery's prior chair Achilles Demetriou, MD, PhD, were focused on a "bioartificial liver" that utilized porcine hepatocytes.

Steven D. Colquhoun, MD, and the Liver Transplantation team are participating in a multicenter trial of a new bioartificial liver for the treatment of patients with acute liver failure. This very sophisticated cell-based therapeutic strategy utilizes transformed human hepatocytes.

The current study is only the first of a series of trials with the ultimate goal of offering support to patients with different forms of liver failure, as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. Preliminary data are extremely encouraging.

The current phase of study is specific to those patients with acute alcohol-related hepatitis. This particular group of patients has a very high mortality rate, and caring for them can be both daunting and frustrating, with few successful therapeutic options.

If you or a colleague anywhere in Southern California are faced with such a patient, please feel free to call 24/7: 310-423-2641. The transplant team can screen and effect a transfer to its unit for randomization. The team looks forward to contributing to this important work and, even more, to utilizing such a bioartificial liver in routine clinical practice to save more lives.

New Outpatient Transplant Center to Open Soon

Two work rooms at the new transplant facility provide meeting space for physicians.

Transplant physicians are preparing to see patients in Cedars-Sinai's new Comprehensive Transplant Center outpatient facility shortly after Labor Day.

"This facility represents such a huge benefit to our transplant patients, who will now have access to all of their transplant physicians and many of their support services in one location," said Andrew S. Klein, MD, director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center. "The building features easy access for our patients, and when they arrive at the valet area, they will take the elevator straight to the third-floor clinic area for their appointment."

The new third-floor clinical space features 22 spacious exam rooms.

Physicians and other staff members can relax and take meal breaks on an outdoor patio on the second floor of the new center.

Located on the southeast corner of Beverly Boulevard and South La Peer Drive, the 32,000-square-foot Transplant Center will house clinical and administrative services for liver, kidney, pancreas and lung transplant patients in a three-story building with a two-story subterranean parking garage. The facility features nearly 12,000 square feet of clinic space, including 22 exam rooms, a three-bay phlebotomy room and a dedicated space for infusion therapy services.

"The building was originally configured as a residential/retail space, so it features numerous design elements that will enhance the patient experience, such as an open floor plan and large windows that allow natural light to come in," says Zeke Triana, AIA, director of Facilities Planning, Design and Construction. "As soon as patients step into the third-floor waiting room, they will have a breathtaking view of the Hollywood Hills. There is also plenty of onsite parking, and patients will have the option of self-parking or using the valet. In addition, there is ample parking for staff members."

Administrative personnel already have moved into their new offices on the second floor of the building, which features an outdoor patio area. These employees include staff members from the Liver Disease and Transplant Center, the Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Center and the Lung Transplant Center. They do not include members of the Heart Transplant team, who will remain in their current offices in the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion and the Pacific Theatres building, as well as private-practice offices on Le Doux Road.

Clinical personnel will move in pending an inspection of the new facility by the California Department of Public Health this month.

Breaking Barriers in Reconstructive Surgery

Randy Sherman, MD

By Randy Sherman, MD
Vice Chair, Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery

A curious face appeared in last month's GQ magazine. Richard Norris had not created a new clothing line, signed a multimillion-dollar professional sports contract or even appeared on any Broadway stage or silver screen.

To the contrary, he lived the life of a shut-in for 15 long years, until he participated in one of the most remarkable surgical feats of all time. In 2012, he became the recipient of the most extensive full-face transplant to date. Performed by plastic surgeon Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, and his brilliant team at the University of Maryland over the course of 36 grueling hours, his medical journey has tested and broken through long-standing barriers in reconstructive surgery and vascularized composite tissue allo-transplantation.

In recent years, plastic surgery units both here and abroad have led the way in facial and extremity transplants, tackling the most complex surgical and immunological challenges. In 1954, Joseph Murray, MD, a leading plastic surgeon and one of only a handful of surgeon Nobel laureates, performed the first kidney transplantation at what is now Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Only three medical centers in the United States have attempted facial transplantation. The infrastructural support, professional expertise and appropriate patient populations that are required make the formation of a unit extremely complex.

As a leading center for multiorgan transplantation, Cedars-Sinai may one day become the home of composite tissue transplantation as well. Rodriguez, now chair of Plastic Surgery at the NYU Langone Medical Center, trained extensively in craniofacial, aesthetics, reconstructive microsurgery and transplant immunology in order to conquer the unique complexities of this remarkable endeavor.

Claude-Jean Langevin, MD, DMD

Allen S. Ho, MD

Babak Azizzadeh, MD

As a first step, we are very fortunate to have recruited a remarkably talented, similarly skilled young reconstructive surgeon in Claude-Jean Langevin, MD, DMD. Trained as both an oral-maxillofacial surgeon and a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with further expertise in craniofacial and reconstructive microsurgery, he brings world-class expertise to our reconstructive efforts at Cedars Sinai.

Over the past year, he has teamed up with Allen S. Ho, MD, our brilliant new head and neck oncologist, to tackle a wide range of complex craniofacial cancer ablation and restorations. Functional microsurgical reconstruction for the correction of facial paralysis by Babak Azizzadeh, MD, as well as extremity and breast reconstruction using free tissue transfer, brings us ever closer to a fully articulated reconstructive surgical unit providing critical services to Southern California.

With this growing team of supremely talented and remarkably dedicated and compassionate surgeons, one day soon, we may be transplanting more than just organs.

Patient's Gift Will Support Sarcoma Study

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD

A gift of $250,000 for the Surgical Oncology Education and Research Fund in honor of Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, was recently received from a grateful patient. The gift will be used to support the ongoing genomic analysis of patients with multiple primary malignancies and sarcomas.

Silberman is clinical chief of Surgical Oncology and the Robert J. and Suzanne Gottlieb Chair in Surgical Oncology.

Cedars-Sinai's serum and tumor bank has samples from more than 600 patients with multiple primary malignancies. The most common combination of tumors is breast cancer and melanoma, and surprisingly, prostate cancer and sarcoma.

The sarcoma study is an effort to differentiate leiomyosarcoma of the uterus from the common uterine leiomyoma (fibroid) prior to manipulation. Unfortunately, Cedars-Sinai has a large population of patients with recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma that were initially felt to have a benign fibroid.

As has been pointed out in both the scientific and lay press, morcellation and other minimally invasive procedures done for suspected fibroids can be devastating if in fact the diagnosis is a leiomyosarcoma. This error occurs in about one in 350 patients. The misdiagnosis leads to a contaminated pelvis doomed to repeated recurrences.

If a mutation can be identified that would differentiate the two entities prior to manipulation, the appropriate treatment could be offered to that rare patient with a uterine sarcoma. Of note is that Johnson & Johnson suspended sales of the laparoscopic power morcellators in April after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advised doctors not to use the tool because of the potential for tumor contamination.

The team also is performing a genomic analysis of patients with bilateral breast cancer who are BRCA-negative, looking for new mutations that may explain their additional risk. Other tumor combinations will be studied as well.

In addition to Silberman, the genomic research team includes:

Farin Amersi, MD, assistant professor of Surgery and associate program director for General Surgery Residency

 

Bonnie Balzer, MD, PhD, director of Surgical Pathology, Dermatopathology and Musculoskeletal Pathology Services

Charles Forscher, MD, medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Sarcoma Center

 

Vincent Funari, PhD, director of the Genomics Core and member of Personalized Medicine

Jennelle Hodge, PhD, associate professor of Pathology and associate professor of Biomedical Sciences

 

Jenny Hong, MD, Complex Surgical Oncology fellow in the Department of Surgery

Jean Lopategui, MD, director of Molecular Pathology and Clinical Cytogenetics

   

Third-Year Students Enjoy Hands-on Training

Third-year medical students from UCLA rotate year-round through all fields in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. This past year, the directorship of the UCLA program was transitioned to Nicolas Melo, MD, and Alan Pierce, the new course director.

UCLA students enrolled in the Continuity Program spend 12 weeks at Cedars-Sinai on a variety of general surgical and elective surgical rotations, as well as in Obstetrics and Gynecology. The Continuity students are paired with a faculty mentor with whom they meet every few weeks to discuss their experience, hardship and career goals.

In addition, the students are welcome at resident teaching sessions in the Women’s Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills, which adds to their experience and exposes them to surgery.

All of the Continuity students passed their standardized shelf exams. This year, eight students who rotated through Cedars-Sinai — including four Continuity students — were awarded Letters of Distinction in Surgery from UCLA.

The UCLA students who rotate through the department get both hands-on and classroom teaching to ensure a well-rounded experience. The overall impression is that they enjoy the teaching and experience. The students gave all faculty members an average rating of 4.5 (on a scale from 1 to 5); residents received an average rating of 4.4.

"Cedars-Sinai Surgery has been incredible," one student said, expressing a common sentiment. "I got to do more and see more than classmates at almost any other site. … Everyone should get to rotate through Cedars-Sinai."

"This was one of my favorite surgical sites," another said. "It was very medical-student friendly, and I felt very welcome here. The residents and attendings made strong efforts to teach me every day."

This commitment to teaching is exemplified by the recognition that a Cedars-Sinai resident, Matthew Singer, MD, was awarded the Excellence in Teaching with Humanism Residents and Fellows Award by the UCLA students. Nominees for this UCLA-wide teaching award are chosen by medical students in all rotations. Cedars-Sinai's yearly intern, junior resident and senior resident teaching award recipients, as selected by the students, were Nicholas Manguso, MD, Jason VonDerHaar, MD, and Singer, respectively.

Education is part of the mission at Cedars-Sinai, and this past year has demonstrated that continued commitment. Cedars-Sinai strives for excellence not just in patient care and research, but also in the education of future physicians.

Dental Residency Program Provides Care to the Community

After a one-year hiatus, the Cedars-Sinai Hospital Dental Residency program has reopened with four new residents and a slightly expanded scope, co-directors Irving Lebovics, DDS, and Denis Weintraub, DDS, announced.

Kristin Geyer, MD

Rod Najibi, MD

Hoa Pham, MD

Hee Jin Yim, MD

The residents — Kristin Geyer, MD, Rod Najibi, MD, Hoa Pham, MD, and Hee Jin Yim, MD — began the training program at the end of June. Their duties include taking dental-related calls in the Emergency Department, providing dental care for oncology and other medically compromised patients, doing dental clearance exams for patients in the transplant and cardiac programs, and responding to requests for consults and dental treatment from throughout the medical center.

"We have a very talented group of residents, and there is a lot for them to do at Cedars-Sinai," Weintraub said. "So few dentists are comfortable seeing medically compromised patients, it is imperative for us to have a full-grade care center here. We also have a highly regarded attending staff whose members are excited to be working again with the dental residents."

In addition to their hospital duties, the residents will do some of their didactic training at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, along with rotations in anesthesia, pain control, internal medicine and oncology at Cedars-Sinai. They will provide general dentistry services at local clinics, which is a new aspect of the program. The addition of the clinic work, which will take place at the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in downtown Los Angeles and at the Children's Dental Center of Greater Los Angeles in Inglewood, is an important component of the residency program, Weintraub said.

"We want our residents to get out into the community where they can do the most good," Weintraub said. "These clinics are places that are easier for people without regular access to dental care to reach and to return to."

The Hospital Dental Residency program at Cedars-Sinai is fully accredited by the American Dental Association.

To schedule a dental consult with one of the residents, call 310-967-7653.

Resident Credits Great Teaching in Car-Crash Response

When Danielle Thomas, MD, saw a car roll over on the freeway, she ran to help the driver, and her training took over.

Danielle Thomas, MD, had no idea that a drive to her parents in San Diego would suddenly lead to a chance to use her training from the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Surgery Residency program. But that's what happened, as she found herself leaping into action at the scene of a car crash.

Thomas was able to act instantaneously to aid an injured driver before other help arrived. She credited the teaching of Guy Paiement, MD, director of the Orthopaedic Surgery Residency, and Donald A. Wiss, MD, director of the Orthopaedic Trauma Program, as well as the skills she picked up during trauma rotations. 

"Even though we're specialists and know a very narrow area of the body, we are doctors first — trained to respond in an emergency, trained to respond in trauma," said Thomas, who recently completed her first year in the program, which included trauma and orthopedic rotations.

In the middle of a May afternoon, Thomas was driving south on the 5 Freeway near Camp Pendleton when she saw a car traveling the opposite direction lose control. The vehicle rolled several times before hitting the center divider and landing upside down.

Still wearing scrubs, Thomas stopped her car, hopped the divider and ran to the crash scene to help. Then her training took over. Thomas started by checking the "ABCs" of the injured driver: airway, breathing and circulation.

"I gave her chest compressions in cycles and checked for a pulse," she said. "When she regained a pulse, I stopped. By then, other people had arrived on the scene."

Paiement said he was not surprised by Thomas' immediate reaction. He described Thomas as knowledgeable, mature and down to earth, and said she had the ideal combination of aptitude and attitude.  "I wouldn't be surprised if she reaches a leadership position in national or international orthopedic societies," he said.

Paiement said physicians in training should, like Thomas, strive to be good doctors first and good specialists second.

"It's really hard, when you're young and enthusiastic about the field that you have chosen, to take a step back and look at the whole picture and the whole patient, but we're really trying to teach the residents to look at the big picture," he said.

Vo Honored for Kidney Transplant Work

Ashley Anh Vo, PharmD

Ashley Anh Vo, PharmD, administrative director of the Transplant Immunotherapy Program at the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center, has been named the 2014 Clinician of Distinction by the American Society of Transplantation for her work in developing anti-rejection drug protocols for patients.

"This prestigious award recognizes Dr.Vo’s clinical excellence and the creative scholarship she brings to the field of transplantation," said Andrew S. Klein MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center. "This is a unique achievement that represents her dedication and tireless work on behalf of transplant patients."

Vo, an associate professor in the Department of Medicine, received the award at the recent World Transplant Congress in San Francisco, an international gathering where Cedars-Sinai kidney transplant clinicians and researchers contributed nearly 30 abstracts and presentations. One of the most highly anticipated presentations involved preliminary research of a new anti-rejection drug known as C1-INH by Stanley C. Jordan, MD, director of Kidney Transplantation and Transplant Immunology at Cedars-Sinai. Patients in the small trial who received C1-INH after transplantation developed fewer complications than those who did not receive the drug.

Vo’s research in immunotherapy began in 1994, when she became the transplant pharmacist at Cedars-Sinai and joined a National Institutes of Health investigation headed by Jordan. Since then, Vo and Jordan have collaborated extensively, producing the 2004 landmark study that identified new anti-rejection treatments.

That study tested IVIG, intravenous immunoglobulin, as an effective therapy for lowering a patient’s level of HLA antibodies, which can cause a patient’s body to reject a transplanted organ. Patients who have been pregnant, been on kidney dialysis or received many blood transfusions often develop HLA antibodies, making it very hard for them to have a successful kidney transplant.

"Dr. Vo has played a key role in our research identifying how IVIG treatment significantly reduces the long amount of time a patient can remain on dialysis, suffering, waiting for a suitable transplant because their HLA antibody levels put them at a high risk of organ rejection," Jordan said. "Her work has been an important asset to the entire field of organ transplantation."

Circle of Friends Honorees for July

The Circle of Friends program honored 131 people in July.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Cheryl L. Abrazado, RN
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Daniel C. Allison, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, RN, MN, AOCN
  • Jennifer T. Anger, MD, MPH
  • Carey Ann Aprahamian, RN
  • M. William Audeh, MD
  • Meredith L. Axtell
  • Michael S. Berlin, MD
  • Andrew M. Braun, RN
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Eileen G. Brown, OCN, RN
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD
  • Charles Cary
  • Jonalyn B. Casiano, RN
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Cheryl G. Charles, MD
  • Melvin D. Chavarria
  • Donnabel L. Cheng
  • Aaron Chiang, MD
  • Michelle Chung, MSN, RN
  • Hart C. Cohen, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Robert T. Coles, MD
  • Martin Cooper, MD
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Margaret R. Farrell, BSN, RN
  • Randy Feldman, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • Tina M. Furseth, RN
  • Marielle H. Garalza, RN
  • Joel M. Geiderman, MD
  • Jay Goldberg, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Behrooz Hakimian, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Heather Henry, BSN, RN-BC, CCRN
  • Emmanuel E. Hernandez
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Jethro L. Hu, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Bjorn C. Inductivo, RN
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Stephanie M. Kagimoto
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sousan Karimi, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Paul H. Kim, RCP
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Karen Klos, BSN, RN
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Wesley Leichty
  • Dora Lendvai, RN
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Karen N. Levine
  • Michael M. Levine, MD
  • Meldon C. Levy, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Charlene T. Lichtash, MD
  • Yuliya Linhares, MD
  • Alex Lopez
  • Phyllis S. Lopez
  • Ian H. Mahorn
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Dwight L. Makoff, MD
  • Ana R. Martinez
  • Gloria Martir
  • Behnam David Massaband, DPM
  • Lisa Masson, MD
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Mary Katharine McCormick, RN
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Chandrakala Medrano, RN
  • Richard J. Metz, MD
  • Steven A. Miles, MD
  • Lori Ann Mountain, RN
  • Rebecca Naor, PA-C
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Sharon G. Nicer, RN
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Sara Oliva, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Resa Oshiro, MD
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Brian Perri, DO
  • Surasak Phuphanich, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Bobbie J. Rimel, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Moussa Saleh, MD
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jennifer Scanlan, RN, BN, OCN
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Oswaldo M. Serpas
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Larisa B. Shekhtman, RN
  • John L. Sherman, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Jason Snibbe, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Victor F. Tapson, MD
  • Pauline A. Taylor
  • Margot S. Throne, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CNOR
  • Paul A. Tournay, RN
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Aracelia Velgara
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Dany Victorio
  • Abraham U. Waks, MD
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • Shelley Yee, MD
  • Bettye Zeigler, RN