sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY October 2014 | Archived Issues

FDA Warns About Extended-Release Opioid Products

Pharmacy Focus

The federal Food and Drug Administration has added a boxed warning to long-acting extended-release opioid products, noting an increased risk of opioid addiction, abuse and misuse, potentially leading to overdose and death. Serious, life-threatening or fatal respiratory depression may occur.


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Educational Schedule

Click a PDF link below to see the Department of Surgery's educational schedule.

Educational Schedule - October 2014 (PDF)

Educational Schedule - November 2014 (PDF)


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

Share Your News

Know an interesting colleague we should profile? A story we should tell? Submit your ideas, meetings and events for consideration.

Click here to submit your news to Sutures

Recognition for Alban, Gewertz, Gordon, Spurrier

Physician News

Alban Represents Department of Surgery at Regional Trauma Grand Rounds

Rodrigo Alban, MD, a trauma and acute care surgeon at Cedars-Sinai, provided a lecture at the Southwest Regional Trauma Coordinating Committee's annual Trauma Grand Rounds on Oct. 17 in Oxnard.

The event was attended by trauma system leaders and trauma care providers from the five counties that make up the Southwest Region of California's trauma system — Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo.

Participating in professional outreach and in trauma system activities is a requirement for Level I trauma centers such as Cedars-Sinai.

Gewertz Earns Women's Guild Medical Visionary Award

Bruce Gewertz, MD, Cedars-Sinai surgeon-in-chief, the H and S Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery and chair of the Department of Surgery, was presented with the Women's Guild Medical Visionary Award. The presentation was made at the Women's Guild gala dinner Oct. 21 at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel.

Gewertz also is vice president of Interventional Services and vice dean of Academic Affairs.

In announcing the award, the organization noted Gewertz's leadership in the new Women's Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills.

Gordon Addresses the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library

Leo Gordon, MD, of the Department of Surgery delivered remarks at the annual fundraising dinner for the Friends of the Texas Medical Center Library on Sept. 26.

The Texas Medical Center Library is the main library resource for the Texas Medical Center in Houston.

His remarks — "Hail to the Chief Complaint!" — outlined the health problems of seven former presidents. Gordon covered the medicine of these illnesses as well as the evolving relationship between the chief executive and the physicians who serve the White House. Gordon's analysis of these maladies also examined the evolving relationship between the press and presidential health.

Gordon discussed George Washington's peritonsillar abscess, Andrew Jackson's osteomyelitis, William Henry Harrison's pneumonic death shortly after his inauguration, James Garfield's septic course after a gunshot wound to the flank, Grover Cleveland's palatal lesion and William Howard Taft's sleep apnea. His presentation ended with an analysis of Dwight D. Eisenhower's heart disease and inflammatory bowel disease and the effect of these illnesses on the election of 1956.

Throughout his presentation, Gordon stressed the changing yet essential role of the medical library in all phases of medical education and medical research.

The presentation ended with a legendary quote from Albert Einstein: "The only thing you absolutely have to know is the location of the library."

Spurrier Is First Author of Study on Tissue-Engineered Esophagus

Ryan Spurrier, MD, a surgical resident, is first author of a study showing that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from human and mouse cells. The study was done at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and was published online by the journal Tissue Engineering Part A. The story was picked up by media outlets including CNBC and Yahoo Finance.