sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY September 2014 | Archived Issues

P and T Approvals, Changes for Hydrocodone, Tramadol

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the Aug. 5 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is more strictly controlling hydrocodone combination products, and more details are available about tramadol's new status as a controlled substance.

» Read more


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

» Read more


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Educational Schedule

Click the PDF link below to see the Department of Surgery's educational schedule.

Educational Schedule - September 2014 (PDF)


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

» Read more

The Secret to a Happy Life? Think Inspiration, Not Money

Message From the Chair

About six years ago, I received the startling news that I had breast cancer. Happiness, of course, was fleeting during those months as I underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. I happened to be writing a speech at the time, ironically titled "Finding Happiness in Life and Work." I found myself contemplating two questions: What produces a happy life? And perhaps even more important: Can we meaningfully influence our happiness by our attitudes and behavior?

» Read more

New Award Named for Adashek

A cash award of $25,000 in honor of Kenneth Adashek, MD, (right) will be given annually to a surgeon on the staff of Cedars-Sinai. The award will provide recognition of Adashek's significant accomplishments, while highlighting Cedars-Sinai's emphasis on compassionate care for each patient.

 

» Read more

Department of Surgery in the News

Members of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery recently made news in a number of fields.

» See a roundup of media coverage

New Flu Policy Goes Into Effect Nov. 1

To help protect the health and safety of patients, visitors and staff members, Cedars-Sinai is implementing a new flu vaccination policy that will be in effect for the duration of the flu season, from Nov. 1 through March 31, 2015. The new policy applies across the health system and is the same for everyone, including medical staff.

» Read more

25 Years, 1,000 Heart Transplants

By Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD

This month, Cedars-Sinai passed a milestone achieved by very few heart centers: We have performed more than 1,000 adult heart transplants since the inception of our program. In 2013, the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute set a record for U.S. heart transplantation. These accomplishments underscore the work of the past four years, when the Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center performed more adult heart transplants than any other U.S. medical center.

» Read more

UNOS Chief Executive Tours New Transplant Facility

Brian M. Shepard, CEO of the United Network for Organ Sharing, paid a visit on Sept. 18 to the new outpatient facility of the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center.
 

» Read more

Medicare Advantage Contracts With Cedars-Sinai

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

We're pleased to announce that Cedars-Sinai will be participating in two Medicare Advantage HMO plans. This is the first time in 15 years that Cedars-Sinai has had a Medicare Advantage option for our patients. The agreements are with the UnitedHealthcare Medicare Advantage HMO and Blue Shield 65 Plus plans.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai and Other Major Providers Collaborating With Anthem Blue Cross on Innovative Health Partnership

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

As part of our ongoing efforts to develop new and innovative partnerships that expand access to Cedars-Sinai for people throughout the region, we are joining with six other major local health systems to participate in a first-in-the-nation insurance product from Anthem Blue Cross that integrates the seven health systems and shares financial risk and gain between the health systems and Anthem.

» Read more

Surgeon Uses Cadaver Meniscus to Rebuild Finger Joints

Artist Joost van Oss was chopping wood a few years ago when he injured the middle knuckle on his right hand. The intense pain and swelling that followed nearly ended his career as a painter and sculptor. Then van Oss, 58, turned to Cedars-Sinai plastic surgeon David A. Kulber, MD, and underwent a novel surgery. Kulber (pictured at right) used knee meniscus from a cadaver to reconstruct van Oss' finger joint.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 117 people in August. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Keeping Work-Related Email in Its Place

Limiting workplace email seems radical, but as an article in the New York Times points out, it's a trend in Germany, and some U.S. companies have followed suit. The sky hasn't fallen.

» Read more

The Secret to a Happy Life? Think Inspiration, Not Money

Message From the Chair

About six years ago, I received the startling news that I had breast cancer. The diagnosis arrived shortly after I went to work at Cedars-Sinai as chief of Surgery. Happiness, of course, was fleeting during those months as I underwent my own surgery, chemotherapy and radiation.

I happened to be writing a speech at the time for fellow surgeons, ironically titled "Finding Happiness in Life and Work." As I wrote, I found myself thinking about that great American philosopher, Woody Allen. "Life," he said, "is full of misery, loneliness and suffering, and it's all over much too soon." But I also found myself contemplating two questions that apply to anyone who yearns for the elusive feeling of joy: What produces a happy life? And perhaps even more important: Can we meaningfully influence our happiness by our attitudes and behavior?

I discovered answers in hard science — specifically, the field of "happiness research," which has blossomed over the past decade as it merged with psychology, neuroscience and economics. Much of this scholarship has focused on the relationship between money and fulfillment. And it has produced a complex picture.

Personal happiness does seem to increase as family incomes rise, a phenomenon apparent in both the U.S. and Great Britain. But once we reach a modest level of income, more money doesn't bring greater satisfaction. On the national level, the percentage of U.S. residents describing themselves as "very happy" has remained constant at about 30 percent from 1945 to 2000 despite a threefold increase in per-capita income, according to one authoritative study.

Social scientists explain this happiness plateau through the "aspiration adjustment hypothesis." As soon as we acquire a moderate amount of wealth, our expectations rise for a higher quality of life. When we don't reach these new levels, our spirits flag, leaving us disillusioned. Doctors, lawyers, teachers, accountants — they all find themselves on what experts call the "hedonic treadmill," working harder and making more money but still feeling blue.

A second explanation comes from the idea of "relative position": We compare our wealth and place in the social hierarchy to those of the people around us. No matter how high we climb, we almost always encounter someone who is richer or who has more things.

The hectic pace of our lives takes its own toll. According to a recent Pew survey, 27 percent of people who are rushed in their daily lives describe themselves as "very happy," but 42 percent who are never rushed are very happy. Whether we are frantically thumbing our smartphones or staring at a television in an airport terminal, too often we spend our time focused on matters that lack any intrinsic meaning. I call this "urgency without importance," and it's a defining characteristic of our time that will not make us happy over the long haul.

Thankfully, there is a solution. It lies in the concept of "flow" — when we completely immerse ourselves in an activity inspired by our own talents and interests. The initial observations of this phenomenon were made among surgeons, athletes and musicians who trained for years to develop skills to perform at the highest levels. In detailed interviews, individuals described a sense of clarity, serenity and even ecstasy when they engaged in activities that paired their innate abilities with meaning and purpose. A University of Chicago psychologist who coined the term explains that true happiness is found among those who maximize the time they spend in flow in their personal and professional lives.

Experts point to other important factors for creating a joy-filled life, including satisfying personal relationships at home, spirituality or religious observance, and strong doses of optimism. After 40 years in the doctor business, I know that all of these are important. I spend my days in the hospital, talking with all kinds of doctors. Despite their comfortable incomes and positions of authority, many bemoan the pressure they experience along with sleep deprivation and a lack of time to enjoy their lives outside the operating room. Many seem downright unhappy. I also spend my days listening to patients who feel robbed of any hope, the way I felt when I had cancer.

As I listen to all of these people, I can't help but think of Woody Allen. For all his wit and wisdom, he had it wrong. Life can have moments of misery, loneliness and suffering, but there's plenty of joy if we know how to find it.

Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
H and S Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery
Chair, Department of Surgery
Vice President, Interventional Services
Vice Dean, Academic Affairs

New Award Named for Adashek

Kenneth Adashek, MD

A cash award of $25,000 in honor of Kenneth Adashek, MD, will be given annually to a surgeon on the staff of Cedars-Sinai.

The Dr. Kenneth Adashek Surgical Excellence Award is made possible by the generosity of Toni and Emmet Stephenson. It is intended to provide vital resources to surgeons, within 10 years of fellowship completion, who exemplify and promulgate the outstanding personal and professional qualities of Adashek, including surgical excellence, dedication to the field of surgery, exceptional interpersonal skills and complete integrity. The award will provide recognition of Adashek's significant accomplishments, while highlighting Cedars-Sinai's emphasis on compassionate care for each patient.

A committee of three, co-chaired by Bruce Gewertz, MD, surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery, and Adashek, will select a finalist from a group of nominees. Adashek and Gewertz will name a third committee member to help select a finalist.

Nominees for this award will be selected from those excellent surgeons who best exhibit professionalism and compassionate, patient-centered care. The prize funds may be applied to educational or academic activity.

Nominations may be sent to johnny.thomas@cshs.org.

The recipient of the first Adashek award will be announced Dec. 1 and presented at the annual departmental holiday party.

Department of Surgery in the News

Members of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery recently made news in a number of fields. Here is a roundup of media coverage.

On the Cutting Edge | Latino Leaders (July 11)

This national publication profiles Miguel Burch, MD, focusing on his achievements and exceptional medical career, his boyhood journey from Bolivia to the United States, and the influence of his tight-knit extended family as he works to help the medically underserved.

Los Angeles Fire Department Gets New Helmets for Fighting Brush Fires | KCAL Los Angeles (July 31)

Daniel Margulies, MD, helped represent Cedars-Sinai at a news conference announcing that the medical center had contributed $50,000 to the Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation to buy 3,200 new wildfire-specific helmets for city firefighters as the height of the fire season approaches. The donation represents the bulk of the $80,000 cost of the helmets. KNBC also picked up the story.

Dangerstoppers: Watch Your Walk | Beverly Hills Television (August)

Daniel Margulies, MD, appears in a city of Beverly Hills television segment drawing attention to auto accidents involving pedestrians. Margulies explains that such incidents represent one of the top three causes of injuries among the trauma patient population.

Simulating Surgery to Save Lives | KNBC Los Angeles (Sept. 15)

A KNBC-TV story highlights Cedars-Sinai's Women's Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills, where surgical teams practice on lifelike mannequins to prepare for real surgical situations. The story, which also aired on other NBC affiliates around the country, captures Alistair Phillips, MD, and his medical team performing congenital heart surgery on a tiny mannequin with a heart the size of a walnut. "This is going to change medicine," Phillips says of the simulations. "This is going to become the standard of training for physicians and teams."

New Flu Policy Goes Into Effect Nov. 1

To help protect the health and safety of patients, visitors and staff members, Cedars-Sinai is implementing a new flu vaccination policy that will be in effect for the duration of the flu season, from Nov. 1 through March 31, 2015. The new policy applies across the health system and is the same for everyone, including medical staff.

Per the new policy, all medical staff and allied health professionals must be vaccinated by Nov. 1. Physicians who are vaccinated will be issued green badge buddies upon either receiving the flu shot at Cedars-Sinai or by submitting an online attestation of vaccination. Those who decline will be issued orange badge buddies. Badge buddies must be worn visibly at all times beginning Nov. 1.

Physicians who decline the vaccine without an approved medical exemption will not be able to work in high-risk patient-care areas and will have to wear an isolation mask in patient-care areas that are not considered high risk. The only exceptions are the Davis Research Building and the research floors of the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, as well as general public areas such as lobbies, entrances, eating areas such as the cafeteria, and pedestrian walkways.

For those requesting medical exemptions, the request process is the same as last year. Medical exemption request forms are available from Employee Health Services in the Steven Spielberg Building.

Free flu vaccinations are available onsite to all medical staff members for their convenience at Employee Health Services. Cedars-Sinai also is scheduling flu shot clinics; a schedule will be announced shortly.

For more information about the new flu policy, please contact the medical staff office at 310-423-5154 or Hospital Epidemiology at 310-423-5574.

25 Years, 1,000 Heart Transplants

By Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
Surgical Director, Lung Transplant Program
Director, Extracorporeal Life Support Program

This month, Cedars-Sinai passed a milestone achieved by very few heart centers: We have performed more than 1,000 adult heart transplants since the inception of our program.

In 2013, the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute set a record for U.S. heart transplantation by completing 119 adult heart transplants. The previous mark, set in 2005, was 98 adult heart transplants performed in a single year. The previous record for annual heart transplants (adult and pediatric combined) performed by a single center in one year was 118.

These accomplishments underscore the work of the past four years, when the Heart Institute and the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center performed more adult heart transplants than any other U.S. medical center, according to statistics compiled by the United Network for Organ Sharing, the nonprofit organization that manages the nation's transplant system and collects data on every transplant performed in the U.S.

One must recall the past to understand where we are now. The first heart transplant at Cedars-Sinai was performed in December 1988. The patient was in her 60s, which at the time was considered rather old for a heart transplant.

When she asked how long she would live after her transplant, she was told that the goal was for her to live at least five more years. However, she had a very full life, living more than 20 years with her transplanted heart. Her family had many more years with her than expected.

We now have two patients who are alive 24 years after heart transplantation.

In the 1990s, approximately 30 transplants per year were performed at Cedars-Sinai, while in the first decade of the 2000s, there were as many as 47 per year. This put Cedars-Sinai in the top 5 percent of programs in the U.S. With the addition of Jon Kobashigawa, MD, and his colleagues, and subsequent recruits on both the surgical and medical sides, the combined team of physicians and surgeons has achieved yearly heart transplant volumes of 75, 87, 95 and 119 in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.

That makes our heart transplant program the largest not only in the U.S. but in the world for the past four years. And we are well on our way to another outstanding year, with 75 heart transplants to date in 2014.

The Cedars-Sinai Heart Transplant Program has a number of firsts. We were the first U.S. program to adopt the bicaval technique for heart implantation. We were the first in the nation to perform the total orthotopic heart transplant technique, with a bicaval and pulmonary venous anastomoses versus the previous standard of biatrial anastomoses. Superior vena cava anastomotic stenosis is a complication that was eliminated by a modification of the standard technique that was developed here at Cedars-Sinai.

It is important to know that our achievement of record volumes and scientific firsts did not come at the expense of quality. We described 100 consecutive patients who underwent heart transplantation without a single early mortality within the first 30 days post-transplant. This record extended to more than 125 consecutive patients without mortality, a feat achieved by no other program in the world.

When examining our results for the 832 patients who received a heart transplant through December 2012, our survival rate of 96 percent at 30 days, 92 percent at one year and nearly 80 percent at five years exceed expected survival rates when compared to averages from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

The Cedars-Sinai Heart Transplant Program also has performed several dual organ transplants. We reported the largest experience with combined heart-kidney transplantation in peer-reviewed medical journals, with survival rates similar to heart transplantation alone. Our first heart-kidney recipient remains alive more than 22 years after transplantation.

In 1998, we also performed the first heart-liver transplant in the western U.S. This patient also has remained alive more than 16 years following transplantation. The Cedars-Sinai Heart Transplant team has a close relationship with the Lung Transplant Program, allowing us to perform two heart-lung transplants last year and five total over the last four years.

We also have performed a triple organ transplant. The patient, who received a heart-lung-kidney transplant, remains alive and has undergone a successful redo lung transplantation.

Cedars-Sinai's leadership in heart transplantation extends to a mechanical pumping device called the SynCardia Total Artificial Heart. Total Artificial Hearts are implanted in heart failure patients who otherwise might not live long enough to receive a heart transplant. In 2013, Cedars-Sinai surgeons implanted 23 Total Artificial Hearts, according to SynCardia, the company that invented and manufactures the device.

The manufacturer said Cedars-Sinai set a yearly record for the number of Total Artificial Heart devices implanted by a single medical center. This year, we have completed 21 Total Artificial Heart implantations, and are poised to possibly set a record.

Another aspect of our program is its academic strength. Our program frequently has one of the highest numbers of abstracts accepted at international meetings, and several of our faculty members are invited speakers. We are participating in 12 clinical trials.

Throughout its 25-year history, the Cedars-Sinai Heart Transplant Program has strived to improve the quality of life for its patients, whether with a heart transplant or a mechanical assist device. We are continuing to strive to improve the outcomes of our patients, and to lead the development of our field for the next 25 years.

UNOS Chief Executive Tours New Transplant Facility

Brian M. Shepard, CEO of the United Network for Organ Sharing, (front row, third from left) with staff members of the Comprehensive Transplant Center's new outpatient facility

Brian M. Shepard, CEO of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), paid a visit on Sept. 18 to the new outpatient facility of the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center. Shepard toured the facility for liver, kidney, lung and pancreas transplant patients.

UNOS is the nonprofit organization that oversees the nation's transplant system.

Previously in Sutures:

New Outpatient Transplant Center to Open Soon (August 2014)

Medicare Advantage Contracts With Cedars-Sinai

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

We're pleased to announce that Cedars-Sinai will be participating in two Medicare Advantage HMO plans. This is the first time in 15 years that Cedars-Sinai has had a Medicare Advantage option for our patients. The agreements are with the UnitedHealthcare Medicare Advantage HMO and Blue Shield 65 Plus plans. Patients in these plans can choose a primary care doctor in either the Cedars-Sinai Medical Group or Cedars-Sinai Health Associates.

These new agreements are part of our efforts to provide the community with a variety of ways to get coverage at Cedars-Sinai.

In a related development, effective Nov. 1, 2014, nearly 2,000 members of the UnitedHealthcare Medicare Advantage HMO plan who previously were assigned to Cedars-Sinai Medical Group and Olympia Medical Center are being transitioned by UnitedHealthcare to have Cedars-Sinai Medical Center as their primary hospital.

The timing of these agreements is meaningful, as Medicare's open enrollment period runs Oct. 15-Dec. 7. Coverage takes effect Jan. 1, 2015. During open enrollment, Medicare beneficiaries can change their plan coverage, including entering into a Medicare Advantage plan, for the following year.

If you have any questions, please contact Cynthia Litt Deculus at cynthia.deculus@cshs.org.

Cedars-Sinai and Other Major Providers Collaborating With Anthem Blue Cross on Innovative Health Partnership

From Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

As part of our ongoing efforts to develop new and innovative partnerships that expand access to Cedars-Sinai for people throughout the region, we are joining with six other major local health systems to participate in a first-in-the-nation insurance product from Anthem Blue Cross that integrates the seven health systems and shares financial risk and gain between the health systems and Anthem.

The insurance product, which Anthem is calling Vivity and which was announced Wednesday, Sept. 17, includes the hospitals and affiliated medical groups of Cedars-Sinai, Good Samaritan Hospital, Huntington Memorial Hospital, MemorialCare Health System, PIH Health, Torrance Memorial Medical Center and UCLA Health. It is initially being offered to employers with more than 50 employees.

In keeping with our strategic goal to develop new relationships in a changing healthcare environment, Vivity is one example of how we can create opportunities for Cedars-Sinai to collaborate productively with other area providers. In addition, Vivity provides an innovative insurance option for employers, and will enable more people to come here who might otherwise not be able to access care at Cedars-Sinai through their insurance.

It is also significant that CalPERS, which has not had an HMO option that included Cedars-Sinai for many years, has already agreed to use Vivity doctors and hospitals within their Select HMO network in Los Angeles and Orange counties. Other large employers can start requesting proposals on Oct. 1, with coverage starting on Jan. 1, 2015.

Below, for your information, is the news release issued by Anthem Blue Cross.

Vivity News Release (PDF)

Surgeon Uses Cadaver Meniscus to Rebuild Finger Joints

Artist Joost van Oss was chopping wood a few years ago when he injured the middle knuckle on his right hand. The intense pain and swelling that followed forced him to give up his love of cooking and sailing, and nearly ended his career as a painter and sculptor.

Then van Oss, 58, turned to Cedars-Sinai plastic surgeon David A. Kulber, MD, and underwent a novel surgery. Kulber (pictured at right) used knee meniscus from a cadaver to reconstruct van Oss' finger joint, departing from the customary technique of inserting a hard silicone implant.

The meniscus — a resilient, spongy cushion that prevents joints from rubbing against one another — blended into van Oss' finger. The result was life-changing: Nine months after surgery, he is cooking, sailing, painting and sculpting again, all without pain.

"It's given me a new lease on life," van Oss said. "I have a hard time remembering what it used to be like."

Kulber, director of the Cedars-Sinai Center for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, pioneered joint reconstruction with cadaver meniscus in the hope of achieving better outcomes for patients like van Oss who suffer from damaged finger joints or arthritis, the most common cause of disability among U.S. adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Silicone implants, Kulber said, are imperfect because they can become infected or break over time, leaving patients with lasting pain or in need of follow-up surgeries. Because the meniscus is malleable, it fits neatly into the joint, merging into the finger as new blood flows through it.

"This is a very exciting approach to a problem that has defied reliable solutions," said Kulber, who also serves as director of the Plastic Surgery Center of Cedars-Sinai Medical Group. "It's a promising option because the meniscus becomes part of the finger."

Kulber's approach has won praise from other leaders in the field of orthopedic surgery.

"Dr. Kulber's technique utilizing cadaver knee meniscus to repair arthritis finger joints has great potential to avoid problems associated with prosthetic reconstructions that limit motion, loosen or break," said Michael Hausman, MD, chief of Hand and Elbow Surgery at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and a member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. "Early results look extremely promising."

Van Oss is pleased that he has regained mobility in his finger. Before surgery, severe pain had prevented him from even picking up a pen or reading a newspaper. Now, he's thinking again about one of his grandest dreams — sailing around the world.

"You don't realize what you're missing when you have pain," he said. "Once it's gone, all of the possibilities that were once there show up again."

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 117 people in August.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Carey Ann Aprahamian, RN
  • Pedrina Arguera
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • Kade T. Birkeland, PharmD
  • Weave Bishop, RN
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Mary Grace Brandon, RN, ACNP-BC
  • Andrew M. Braun, RN
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Jonalyn B. Casiano, RN
  • Patrice Ceballos
  • Michelle Chang, RN
  • Susan J. Chapdelaine, MSN, RN, CNL, PHN, CN
  • Zenith Chua, RN
  • Akesha Cooper
  • Rey M. Cuenca
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Lloyd W. Davis Jr.
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • Christine Ellis
  • Randy Feldman, MD
  • Kimberly Fong, RN
  • Laurence J. Friedman, MD
  • Dionne M. Fuentes, RN
  • Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
  • Leena C. Gibson, MD
  • Nelson P. Gines
  • Eli Ginsburg, MD
  • Laura S. Glen, RN
  • Jay Goldberg, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Helfenstein, MD
  • Lucia Hernandez
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Emily J. Holt, RN
  • Rachelle Hufanda, RN
  • Bjorn C. Inductivo, RN
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Elaine S. Kamil, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Angela Khurdajian
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Charles F. Kivowitz, MD
  • Mitchell S. Komaiko, MD
  • David A. Kulber, MD
  • Claude Jean Langevin, MD, DMD
  • Sung Yun Lee, RN
  • Dora Lendvai, RN
  • Richard A. Lewis, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Cynthia A. Litwer Schwieger, MD
  • David Logan
  • Moody M. Makar, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Dwight L. Makoff, MD
  • Cynda S. Makowka, RN
  • Rhea Marie L. Maningo
  • Ana S. Martinez
  • Melissa A. Mcclain, RN
  • Chandrakala Medrano, RN
  • Edgar Mendoza
  • Kathrin S. Michelsen, PhD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Miriam Mishayev, RN
  • Esther Morrison, RN
  • Liana Moskal, RN
  • Lori Ann Mountain, RN
  • Debraj Mukherjee, MD
  • Annie Neal, NCT
  • Alan C. Newman, DDS
  • Philip K. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Kenith K. Paresa, MD
  • Joanna M. Pasion, RN
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Barbara Plowden
  • Irving Posalski, MD
  • Dechu P. Puliyanda, MD
  • R.L. Patrick Rhoten, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Tanya M. Sanders, BSN, RN
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Heidi Sarkozy, PA-C
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Lorraine M. Sdrales, MD
  • Oswaldo M. Serpas
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Diana L. Taylor, RN
  • Paul A. Tournay, RN
  • Shirin Towfigh, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Timothy Tsui, MD
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Karen Z. Vaccaro, RN
  • Raquel G. Vivanco, RN
  • Peter S. Waldstein, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Jeffrey C. Wertheimer, PhD
  • Agazi Woldai, RN
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Amara Yob, BSN, RN, OCN
  • John S. Yu, MD

Keeping Work-Related Email in Its Place

Americans spend a lot of time on work-related email, and not just at the office — according to this article in the New York Times, many check it before they get out of bed in the morning, at dinner and well into the evening. Limiting workplace email seems radical, but as the article points out, it's a trend in Germany, and some U.S. companies have followed suit. The sky hasn't fallen. In fact, the change turns out to be surprisingly manageable.

End the Tyranny of 24/7 Email (New York Times, Aug. 28)