sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY December 2015 | Archived Issues

FDA Warns About SGLT2 Inhibitors, Contrast Media

Pharmacy Focus

A review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has resulted in additional warnings on the labels of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors about the risks of too much acid in the blood and of serious urinary tract infections. Also, the FDA is advising that rare cases of underactive thyroid have been reported in infants following the use of contrast media containing iodine for X-rays and other medical imaging procedures. 

» Read more


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

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Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF links below to see the Department of Surgery's education schedule.

Education Schedule - December 2015 (PDF)  


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

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A Skill for the Year Ahead

By Harry Sax, MD, Professor and Executive Vice Chair, Department of Surgery

Columns around the holidays often focus on the accomplishments of the past year and hopes for the next 12 months. We certainly have much of which to be proud, as well as personal goals for next year. At the same time, this year multiple aspects of our world are in disarray. It may seem that we will never again see "the good old days." Yet, mankind has endured multiple challenges over the years and, especially in medicine, there is a quality that guarantees our success.

» Read more

SCORE Marks Three Years of Changing Culture

Events Jan. 13 Include Showcase for Projects, Open House

For three years, teams across Cedars-Sinai have been engaging caregivers around the concept of SCORE, or "Safe Care in the O.R. Everytime." SCORE's unit-based interdisciplinary teams are committed to emphasizing the importance of culture in relation to surgical quality and improvements in the patient safety process. SCORE will celebrate its third anniversary with a pair of events Wednesday, Jan. 13.

» Read more

Two Minutes With …

This question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the physicians in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. This month's installment features Catherine M. Dang, MD, Andrew Eisenthal, MD, and Carol Lin, MD.

» Read more

U.S. News 'Best Hospitals' Physician Survey

From Chris Ng, MD, Chief of Staff

The U.S. News & World Report "Best Hospitals" rankings are based on a variety of quantitative and qualitative factors, one of which is a reputational score assessed by board-certified physicians in each specialty. This year, all U.S. physicians with designated board certifications will be eligible to participate.

» Read more

Antimicrobial Stewardship Alerts in CS-Link

From Chris Ng, MD, Chief of Staff

In an effort to reduce antimicrobial resistance and improve patient safety, Cedars-Sinai is launching best practice alerts in CS-Link™ for patients receiving selected antibiotics for three or more days. Increasing rates of drug-resistant infections and a limited supply of new antibiotics have placed new emphasis on promoting the safe, efficient use of antibiotics at healthcare organizations across the nation.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Increases Presence in China

An initiative to provide world-class medical care to Chinese citizens, both those who travel to the U.S. and those in China, continues to yield excellent results. That was the message delivered to the approximately 50 attendees of a recent luncheon hosted by the Cedars-Sinai Center for International Health.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

COF Logo

The Circle of Friends program honored 201 people in November. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

A Skill for the Year Ahead

By Harry C. Sax, MD
Professor and Executive Vice Chair, Department of Surgery

Columns around the holidays often focus on the accomplishments of the past year and hopes for the next 12 months. We certainly have much of which to be proud, as well as personal goals for next year.

At the same time, this year multiple aspects of our world are in disarray. From the uneasiness of our own security, to a volatile economic environment, to increasing scrutiny of how we care for our patients, it would be easy to become discouraged. It may seem that we will never again see "the good old days." Yet, mankind has endured multiple challenges over the years and, especially in medicine, there is a quality that guarantees our success:

Resilience.

Today we hear of resilience in the streets of Paris and the women's schools in Afghanistan. As healthcare providers, every day we see the inherent resilience of the human body and spirit. We drive blood counts to close to zero to eradicate leukemia, then give a small aliquot of normal cells to engraft and bring a patient back from near death.

Daily, surgeons induce significant trauma on a human and the body heals our interventions, restoring health. We can all recall specific patients who required multiple procedures and therapies and refused to give in to their disease, as well as those who failed after what seemed like a minor intervention. The difference is resilience.

Resilience isn't limited to patients. Providers are exposed to some of the greatest joys and the deepest depths of despair imaginable. We commit to extended periods of training, often in lieu of sleep or other basic needs, in an effort to gain the skills to provide the best possible care to our patients. As we practice, we often have our decisions questioned by those who have never been in our situation. Economic factors are changing rapidly, and what worked before may now not. It would be easy to get discouraged and become passive.

Yet we don't, because a basic tenet of the surgical mindset is to move ahead in the face of adversity. From the first day of internship, we honed our resilience, and these skills will carry us forward. When times become even more challenging, there are additional steps we can take to succeed and focus on a fulfilling career and life. I certainly don't profess to have all the answers, but from both my own experiences and that of experts several facts are clear.

  • Connections are key. Nurture relationships with your colleagues, family and friends outside of medicine. Get involved with a civic or faith-based organization. Be willing to accept help from others.
  • Change is a part of living. We would never have seen the advancements in medicine if it weren't for the willingness to change from pre-existing dogma. We may find that certain goals are no longer attainable, yet new and different opportunities open up. To try to change things over which you have no control is a sure formula for failure and frustration. Wisdom comes from knowing what you can control and change and accepting what you can't.
  • You must take care of yourself. What we do is physically and emotionally taxing. Find a physical activity that you enjoy and commit to it regularly. Take the time for self-reflection. Thinking through situations ahead of time makes them less stressful when you are confronted with them and builds resilience.
  • Try to maintain a hopeful outlook. In a Scandinavian study that Bruce Gewertz, MD, commonly cites, optimistic people lived longer than an age- and health-adjusted cohort of those with a more pessimistic outlook on life. Focus on what you see as your goals rather than the things that you fear. As you solve problems, you will begin to trust your instincts and see the glass as half full.
  • Remember that this too will pass. Often in the midst of a crisis we are subjected to highly stressful events. We may feel that whatever mistakes we made are now insurmountable barriers. Resilience grows with recognizing that there will be a future and circumstances will improve. One of the benefits of age is that you will experience this cycle more than once and a predictable rhythm develops.
  • Don't be afraid to reach out. It is no surprise that the holidays have higher rates of depression, suicide and substance abuse. Often the things we've lost become more real when we aren't with family and loved ones. The inevitable year end self-reflection can spin into dysfunctional thoughts. As healers we often don't allow ourselves to accept help. True strength is knowing when you are vulnerable.

In these challenging times, I am firmly convinced that there will be tremendous opportunity to find greater strength and resilience both within ourselves and as a community.

Every best wish for a healthy, happy, and fulfilling new year.

SCORE Marks Three Years of Changing Culture

SCORE team members discuss a project during rounds with Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and CEO (right). Team members (from left) are Curtis Woodworth, RN, Andrew Kim, RN, and Julian Gold, MD.

For three years, teams across Cedars-Sinai have been engaging caregivers around the concept of SCORE, or "Safe Care in the O.R. Everytime." SCORE's unit-based interdisciplinary teams, led by surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses and technicians in partnership with administrative leadership, are committed to emphasizing the importance of culture in relation to surgical quality and improvements in the patient safety process.

SCORE will celebrate its third anniversary on Wednesday, Jan. 13. The main event will take place from 6:30-7:30 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium, where SCORE teams will showcase their projects. An open house is scheduled for 1-4 p.m. in the North Tower, Fifth Floor, room 5329.

Julian Gold, MD, co-chair of the Department of Anesthesia and a member of the SCORE leadership team, said SCORE is changing more than processes in the operating room.

"The underlying driver for this project is the fact that we want to change the O.R. culture," Gold said. "We really want the culture to be one where people feel comfortable speaking up about things they think are issues and getting constructive feedback from colleagues. Everyone in the O.R. should have a voice if they believe there are things that are not safe and should be done better."

Thomas D. Gordon, executive vice president of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, said he is seeing a change in culture thanks to the SCORE program.

"I actually believe it is starting to become a part of the everyday culture," Gordon said. "I think the program has been so successful — we've gotten to know the staff members, staff members have felt comfortable, docs have felt comfortable and I think that it has brought everyone closer together."

Juan Cobos, RN, 6OR's SCORE team lead, has been with Cedars-Sinai since 2009 and was part of SCORE when it began. The 6OR team has worked to develop more in-depth timeouts and has developed the OR Sweep, which removes all previous patient identifiers from the operating room, helping avoid a mislabeled specimen that could affect a patient's diagnosis.Surgical teams are not allowed to start opening for the next case until it is verified that nothing has been left behind.

In implementing projects like this, Cobos said, teams have to be aware of the barrier of complacency.

"You have to be motivated to try and overcome the attitude of 'This is how we've always done it,'" Cobos said. "That is one of the things that we encountered in the beginning. It's a big barrier, but we have to look at the greater good, and if it costs us a couple seconds to try something new, it's worth it for the patients."

Manisha Ati, RN, of the 8OR SCORE team said that working with the Performance Improvement Department's Lean Six Sigma management tools has helped 8OR succeed with projects such as the noise control effort Help Us Support Healing, and the team's current project, in which it is working to improve the use of intraoperative ultrasound.

"What I think is great about SCORE, especially with the Lean tools, is that it actually gives you a way to solve problems," Ati said. "We get so overwhelmed by this whole system we're caught up in, but it forces you to break it down on a micro level and say OK, we can't control what's above us, but we can control what's in front of us, so let's pinpoint certain issues, figure out how we can tackle it and actually fix it.

"That's what is wonderful about SCORE — it's tangible change, things you can have an impact on. I think that's wonderful, especially in the O.R. Now you have the tools and the means and the ways and the support to actually change something."

In its three years, the program has grown to affect many areas. Gordon, who is involved with the SCORE team in the 310 Building, said there are many benefits to being part of the program.

"Staff members have the chance to meet senior management and develop a relationship with them," Gordon said. "I think senior management benefits by getting to know what the staff's needs and wants are; I think it breaks down all silos. Every one of my colleagues that I speak to is grateful that we get the chance to be involved and help. I look forward to the fact that senior management, staff and physicians get to work more closely together, and I think that is a privilege."

Gold hopes that as this program attracts new members and continues to grow, the idea of collaborative process improvement will become part of the everyday working environment.

"As Mr. Priselac says, 'Healthcare is a team sport,'" Gold said, referring to Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and CEO. "At the end of the day, it really is all about the patient. The patient isn't focused on the quality of the work of a single individual, but it's really about how they feel at the end of it all, which is a reflection of the quality of the work of everybody who touches the patient."

For more information, contact Jay Arcilla, project manager for Perioperative/Procedural Services in Performance Improvement, at jay.arcilla@cshs.org.

Two Minutes With …

Catherine M. Dang, MD, associate director of the Wasserman Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program and surgeon at the Saul and Joyce Brandman Breast Center - A Project of Women's Guild

Where did you grow up?

I was born on a military base in Vietnam and left as a boat person when Saigon fell in 1975. My family moved around a bit while my dad retrained as an anesthesiologist before we settled in Germantown, Tennessee, which is known for its charity horse show and FedEx-St. Jude Children's Hospital golf tournament. I attended college at Harvard and then medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons before moving to L.A. for surgical training at UCLA and finally Cedars-Sinai, where I've been ever since.

Would you share something that many people at the hospital wouldn't know about you?

Most of my family works in healthcare. My father was an anesthesiologist, and my mother is a hospital pharmacist. My two brothers practice urology and medical oncology elsewhere. Even my sisters-in-law are physicians. My husband, Andrew Li, is a gynecologic oncologist here at Cedars-Sinai. We have three young boys, who told us they only want to become doctors if they can't get into engineering or be video game creators. (Smart boys.)

If you had time to develop a new skill, what would it be?

If I had more time and were a lot younger, I would take up a sport like CrossFit because of the emphasis on health, teamwork and pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone. Cedars-Sinai's Employee Wellness Program offers a CrossFit style program called SolFit, which I highly recommend. I think that even though we work in healthcare, we don't always make healthy choices for ourselves. We take the elevators when we can take the stairs; we eat not-so-healthy foods because they are more convenient, etc.

Is there something or someplace you have never seen that you would like to see in the near future?

I would love to visit the Galapagos Islands someday. As a history and science major in college, I really enjoyed learning about scientific pioneers like Sir Charles Darwin. It would be really interesting to get a glimpse into his experience visiting the islands and encountering all kinds of new and unusual animals.

What is the most rewarding aspect about your job?

While the worst part of being a breast surgeon is giving someone a diagnosis of cancer, the best part is seeing them come back year after year for routine visits because there's no sign of cancer recurrence and that they look good and feel good about themselves. I love it even more when they bring their children and grandchildren, because it reminds me of the fact that every patient we care for is someone's mother, grandmother or sister. I am also really fortunate to work with a compassionate, dedicated and talented team of physicians, nurses and staff at the Brandman Breast Center at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars-Sinai.


Andrew Eisenthal, MD, surgical resident

What brought you to Cedars-Sinai?

All the friendly people I met during my interview … and the weather. 

Where did you grow up?

Northern New Jerseey. 

If you were not a physician, what other career would you choose?

Scientist or bread baker.

What did your parents always tell you that you now have to admit was correct?

Scotch is better than beer.

If you could spend the day doing one thing, what would it be?

Play Pebble Beach.


Carol Lin, MD, faculty member

Where did you grow up?

Tustin, California.

What is the most rewarding aspect about your job?

Watching patients get back to their lives after trauma.

What is the funniest thing a patient has ever said to you?

"Doc, do you like photography?"

Um, yes. Why do you ask?

"Well, why don't we turn out the lights and see what develops."

If you had time to develop a new skill, what would it be?

Sailing.

Is there something or someplace you have never seen that you would like to see in the near future?

Iceland.

U.S. News 'Best Hospitals' Physician Survey

From Chris Ng, MD, Chief of Staff

The U.S. News & World Report "Best Hospitals" rankings are based on a variety of quantitative and qualitative factors, one of which is a reputational score assessed by board-certified physicians in each specialty.

This year, all U.S. physicians with designated board certifications will be eligible to participate.

If you are eligible and enrolled in Doximity — a free, online professional network — you will be surveyed separately through an email invitation.

Eligible physicians who are not Doximity users will be surveyed by mail.

While we all know that the U.S. News rankings are neither the most accurate nor relevant metric for the clinical effectiveness and even the reputation of academic medical centers, expanding the number of physicians who can vote will likely improve the accuracy of the survey.

Thank you in advance for your time and consideration.

Antimicrobial Stewardship Alerts in CS-Link

From Chris Ng, MD, Chief of Staff

In an effort to reduce antimicrobial resistance and improve patient safety, Cedars-Sinai is launching best practice alerts in CS-Link™ for patients receiving selected antibiotics for three or more days. Increasing rates of drug-resistant infections and a limited supply of new antibiotics have placed new emphasis on promoting the safe, efficient use of antibiotics at healthcare organizations across the nation. Although antibiotics can save lives, they can also lead to complications including drug reactions and other serious infections such as Clostridium difficile.

This "three-day alert" will be implemented in phases, beginning in four test-of-change units — 4 Northwest, 5 Northeast, 5 Southwest and 8 Southwest — on Nov. 17. It will launch housewide for vancomycin on Dec. 8. The alerts are meant to help clinicians appropriately modify empiric antibiotic regimens after additional clinical information becomes available.

As part of the alerts, clinicians who prescribe antibiotics will be prompted to indicate their plans to discontinue, modify or continue use on the third day of a patient's treatment.

If treatment is continued, clinicians will need to document their reasons for continued therapy. The alert will also include a reference link to the Cedars-Sinai empiric antibiotic treatment guidelines to assist with antibiotic selection. In some cases, clinicians may also be contacted by a pharmacist to discuss antimicrobial therapy.

Should you have any questions or concerns about this project, please contact the antimicrobial stewardship pharmacist at 310-433-8700, ext. 3-5352 or by pager 1462.

We appreciate your continued collaboration in keeping our patients safe by ensuring they receive no more and no less antibiotic treatment than necessary. We will be soliciting your feedback as we move forward with this initiative to help guide future antimicrobial stewardship interventions. We also encourage you to take advantage of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's resources on antimicrobial stewardship as it celebrates Get Smart About Antibiotics Week next week.

Thank you for your support of this critical patient safety initiative.

Cedars-Sinai Increases Presence in China

An initiative to provide world-class medical care to Chinese citizens, both those who travel to the U.S. and those in China, continues to yield excellent results. That was the message delivered to the approximately 50 attendees of a recent luncheon hosted by the Cedars-Sinai Center for International Health.

"We want to establish Cedars-Sinai as a leading healthcare brand in China," said Spencer Koerner, MD, medical director of the international health center. "The goal is to improve China's access to the best medical care."

Cedars-Sinai became a founding partner in a citywide program, Discover LA Medical Care, at its launch in November 2014. Established by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, the initiative seeks to make travel to Los Angeles for medical care convenient and easy.

With an increase in travel by Chinese nationals, made possible by the growth of wealth in the nation as well as the availability of longer visas, Cedars-Sinai is in a strong position to expand its brand internationally, Koerner said.

"The international health program was established to offer specialized services to people from other countries," Koerner said. "We served 70 people in our first year; last year we treated 1,000 patients from 70 countries."

Los Angeles, with its mild climate, excellent amenities and natural beauty, is part of the marketing plan, Koerner said. Publicity tools include the launch of a Cedars-Sinai website in Chinese, the use of Chinese social media and the formation of partnerships with groups and influential individuals within the Chinese community in the San Gabriel Valley.

Attendees at the luncheon — mostly Cedars-Sinai staff members with ties to or an interest in China — discussed issues such as translation services, medical insurance and the exchange of medical knowledge.

In addition to encouraging Chinese patients to travel to Cedars-Sinai for treatment, the medical center is working to establish partnerships within China's medical community. That includes expanding Cedars-Sinai's partnerships with private hospitals within China as well as working with highly ranked public hospitals. Collaborations in research and teaching are also in the works.

"We want to get the word out that Cedars-Sinai is here and that we are eager to collaborate to share our world-class medical care worldwide," Koerner said.

Those attending the luncheon were mostly Cedars-Sinai staff members with ties to or an interest in China.

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 201 people in November.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Evelyn A. Albovias, RN
  • Nabilah A. Ali, PA
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Vincent C. Amos
  • Jennifer T. Anger, MD, MPH
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • David Austin, MD
  • Lilia G. Ayap
  • Tina G. Ban, RN
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Brian M. Benway, MD
  • Kade T. Birkeland, PharmD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Vivien S. Bonert, MD
  • Joyce Brempong, RN
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • William W. Brien, MD
  • Kerri M. Brown, RN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Judeen Camacho, NP
  • Jeffrey F. Caren, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Claudia Castellanos, LVN
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Wen Cheng, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Kathy Cook, RN
  • Maria S. Corral
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Mark M. Davidson, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Lina Y. De Ocampo
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Premal J. Desai, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Karyn Eilber, MD
  • Brandon Esenther, MD
  • Shahrooz Eshaghian, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Christopher R. Fitzgerald, MD
  • Phillip R. Fleshner, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Irvin Raquel Fuentes
  • Steven S. Galen, MD
  • Cyril Gaultier, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Katherine A. Gershik, BSN, RN
  • Sara Ghandehari, MD
  • Vlad Gheorghiu, MSN, RN, NP
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Leo A. Gordon, MD
  • Virginia W. Grant, LVN
  • Jo Ellen Grossman, RN
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Behrooz Hakimian, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Donald R. Henderson, MD, MPH
  • Allen S. Ho, MD
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Angela C. Javier, RN
  • Albert M. Jobelle, RN
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Debra R. Judelson, MD
  • Peter Julien, MD
  • Marshall L. Kadner, MD
  • Kamran Kalpari, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sousan Karimi, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • David M. Keys
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Irene Kim, MD
  • Joan C. Kirschner, MSN, RN, ANP-BC
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Evgeniya Kryuchkova, RN
  • Linda M. Lamendola, BSN, RN, CMSRN
  • Claude Jean Langevin, MD, DMD
  • Linda M. Lemus
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Daniel Lieber, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Yuliya Linhares, MD
  • Cynthia A. Litwer Schwieger, MD
  • Frank S. Liu, MD
  • Howard L. Liu, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Cierra N. Lukers, RN
  • Joanne Lutman, RN, OCN
  • Cheryle C. Maano-Requejo
  • Jennifer A. Mak, PharmD
  • Marc Makhani, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • George Matar
  • Peggy Mays
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Sharron L. Mee, MD
  • Shlomo Melmed, MD
  • Erin Meschter, MD
  • Tamar Meszaros, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Steven A. Miles, MD
  • Sarah Miller, BSN, RN
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Mary C. Nasmyth, MD
  • Yosef Y. Nasseri, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Ricardo Navas, MD
  • Chelsea B. Nelson, RN
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Raena S. Olsen, DO
  • Alfred W. Omansky
  • Yuridia Orellana-Santiago, BSN, RN
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Dorothy J. Park, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Chirag G. Patil, MD
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Alice Peng, MD
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Charles Pollick, MD
  • Maximillian R. Ponce
  • Ravi S. Prasad, MD
  • Angel P. Puquiz, BSN, RN
  • Florian Rader, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Jenna Renella
  • Ali Rezaie, MD
  • Robert M. Rose, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Bruce A. Samuels, MD
  • Robert Sanford, MD
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • C. Andrew Schroeder, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Katharine Slocum, MA, OTR/L
  • Tracey L. Solitare, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Shlee S. Song, MD
  • Igor Spanic
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Colin Stokol, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD
  • Kazu Suzuki, DPM
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • Jasper T. Tadiaman, RN
  • Cheryl A. Taylor
  • Nattapaun Thepyasuwan, DO
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Camille O. Thornton
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Leo Treyzon, MD, MS
  • Jocelyn Z. Uy, BSN, RN-BC
  • Patricia K. VanStrien, RN
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Donald A. Wiss, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Howard Wynne, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • Rachel Zabner, MD
  • Yvonne Zandi
  • Vida Zhang, MD