sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY January 2015 | Archived Issues

Our Extraordinary Residents Reflect Their Environment

Message From the Chair

The late fall and early winter are the time for resident recruitment efforts. This year was yet another opportunity to consider the remarkable maturation of the Cedars-Sinai surgical residency programs.

» Read more

To See Ourselves as Others See Us

By Harry C. Sax, MD

Each of us has risen to our present positions because, over the years, we have excelled at standardized tests, passed various certification exams, hit our productivity targets for the quarter and received accolades for how good we are. But are we really as good as we think? And are we measuring "the right stuff"?

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Retains Surgical Jeopardy Title

Cedars-Sinai has won its fourth straight Surgical Jeopardy title at the annual meeting of the Southern California Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. General surgery residents Jeff Johnson, MD, and Scott Short, MD, earned the trophy, known as the Dowden Cup.
 

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Surgery Team Wins ACS Debate Competition

The Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery's team defeated Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in a debate at the American College of Surgeons chapter meeting this month in Santa Barbara.


 

» Read more

Gewertz's New Book for Physicians Discusses Leadership

A new book by Bruce Gewertz, MD, is designed to help physicians improve their leadership skills. Gewertz wrote The Best Medicine: A Physician's Guide to Effective Leadership with a business professor at the University of Southern California.


 

» Read more

A Very Successful Joint Commission Survey

From Mark R. Gavens, Chief Operating Officer; 
Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Chief Nursing Officer

Once again, you have demonstrated your passion, teamwork and commitment to our patients and community during last month's successful Joint Commission survey.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Web Activities

On the top tool bar of CS-Link™ you will find Web Activities. In case you haven't clicked it recently, it is worth a look.

» Read more

Open House Jan. 29 Celebrates Transplant Center

All employees, volunteers and medical staff members are invited to a celebration of the new Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center on Thursday, Jan. 29, from 7-10 a.m. The open house will include a breakfast, remarks, tours and gift giveaway.

» Read more

Conference on Sinus, Eustachian Tube Surgery Is March 28

A conference on sinus and eustachian tube surgery will take place Saturday, March 28, from 7:15 a.m.-5 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium. The conference will provide participants with the latest information on technological advances and innovative approaches to sinus surgery and other rapidly changing aspects of otolaryngological care.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Doctors Help Chinese Surgeons Go Solo

On their first medical mission to central China in 2011 to help orphans with anorectal malformations, Cedars-Sinai physicians and nurses performed life-saving surgeries that local doctors had never seen before. Last fall, thanks to a series of innovations the team has implemented since then, Chinese surgeons and nurses were handling similar cases on their own.

» Read more

P & T Approvals, FDA Warning About Ziprasidone

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the Dec. 2 meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned that the antipsychotic drug ziprasidone is associated with a rare but serious skin reaction.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for December

The Circle of Friends program honored 316 people in December. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Our Extraordinary Residents Reflect Their Environment

Message From the Chair

The late fall and early winter are the time for resident recruitment efforts. This past year was yet another opportunity to consider the remarkable maturation of the Cedars-Sinai surgical residency programs.

We now have a broad complement of nationally ranked "primary certificate" residencies in general surgery, orthopedics, podiatry and urology to go along with our residency in cardiothoracic surgery and numerous specialty fellowships. The number of outstanding applicants in each program has increased to the point that as many as 50 percent of all U.S. medical graduates interested in a given field include Cedars-Sinai in their application list.

Predictably, the quality of residents that we have matched reflects this great applicant pool. Our residents are excelling in their clinical rotations; it is an unusual week when I don't receive a letter from a patient's family complimenting our residents' maturity and caring attitude or a spontaneous expression from an attending about how terrific it is to work with such positive and motivated young people.

Our trainees also have achieved in basic and clinical research with important and prize-winning research publications in every discipline. The excellence of our trainees is demonstrated most clearly in their first jobs after training. For example, in general surgery this past year, all five chief residents received highly prized fellowships in some of the most competitive programs in the country in plastic surgery, colorectal, trauma, surgical oncology and pediatric surgery.

These kinds of results are a reflection of the extraordinary environment here, which blends community and academic practice in a way that few if any other places have ever matched. It also reflects the unwavering commitment of our diverse surgical staff to these educational efforts. Like so many other worthwhile pursuits, it builds upon itself and makes each day we practice here a bit more enjoyable.

We all understand that we have some challenges to maintain our edge in this area. We will need to develop facilities to maximize the efficiency of teaching. A good example is the Women's Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills, which has dramatically changed our capabilities. Still more resident space and support will be needed. As well, along with the rest of the world, we will need to figure out a way to cope with even more rigorous work-hour restrictions.

All that said, the remarkable solidarity of our surgeons in supporting and nurturing the training programs is the very best indicator that we will figure it out and continue to enjoy the special environment we have created.

Bruce L. Gewertz, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief
H and S Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery
Chair, Department of Surgery
Vice President, Interventional Services
Vice Dean, Academic Affairs

To See Ourselves as Others See Us

By Harry C. Sax, MD
Professor and Executive Vice Chair, Department of Surgery

"That's the news from Lake Wobegon, where all the women are strong, all the men are good looking, and all the children are above average." — "A Prairie Home Companion"

Each of us has risen to our present positions because, over the years, we have excelled at standardized tests, passed various certification exams, hit our productivity targets for the quarter and received accolades for how good we are. To get on the medical staff at Cedars-Sinai, all the evaluations must be above average, or additional follow-up and adjudication is required. As we do performance reviews for those we supervise, the vast majority of boxes checked are "exceeds expectations."

But are we really as good as we think? And are we measuring "the right stuff"?

From the outside, Cedars-Sinai has a reputation for excellent care, but at high cost. This has led to the exclusion of the institution, and many medical staff members, from participation in new contracts and patient groups. Even for simple procedures such as appendectomy or cholecystectomy, the range in costs of the equipment chosen varies by thousands of dollars, depending on the physician.

As leaders, we have received results from anonymous employee engagement surveys that we are not providing enough support, guidance and feedback to those we supervise. And our own evaluations tend to come from those above us, rather than those we mentor and for whom we are responsible.

Cedars-Sinai is addressing these challenges in several ways. One is active feedback to the medical staff on performance measures that are being examined by outside agencies and are used in deciding whether you can participate in various products.

The first will be length of stay index (LOSI). This is the ratio of how long your inpatients stay in the hospital versus how long they would be expected to stay based on co-morbidities and the severity of the index illness. Multiple factors can affect this, including variability in coordination of care, excessive consultant use and inadequate documentation of how ill our patients really are.

We've made great progress on LOSI with the Physician Advocate Program, and we want you to see your own results over time. In addition, we are providing access to the Crimson physician performance profile for you to review your own data in greater depth 24/7. This will soon include actual cost data, as opposed to charges, so you can examine and optimize your own practice.

On a broader scale, as an institution, we are increasing the use of the 360 evaluation. As implied by its title, this tool seeks feedback from colleagues, supervisors and direct reports. It provides a more realistic view of your performance in multiple dimensions. It can be quite eye opening and sometimes disconcerting. We are all colored in our own perceptions of our abilities; it is vital that we see how we are truly perceived. As a department, we are examining how this tool can help us each identify opportunities for self-improvement.

Being measured by others is always a bit uncomfortable, is open to subjectivity and can be seen as unfair. Yet as Socrates said, "The unexamined life is not worth living, and the unlived life is not worth examining." If Socrates was your supervisor today, he likely would be offering you these tools.

Cedars-Sinai Retains Surgical Jeopardy Title

Scott Short, MD, (left) and Jeff Johnson, MD, with the Dowden Cup

Cedars-Sinai has won its fourth straight Surgical Jeopardy title at the annual meeting of the Southern California Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. General surgery residents Jeff Johnson, MD, and Scott Short, MD, earned the trophy, known as the Dowden Cup.

This year's contest among Southern California residency programs was the seventh annual competition based on the TV game show "Jeopardy!"

The meeting took place Jan. 16-18 in Santa Barbara.

Related story:

Cedars-Sinai Surgery Team Wins ACS Debate Competition

Cedars-Sinai Surgery Team Wins ACS Debate Competition

Gordon and Singer - ACS Debate 480px

Leo Gordon, MD, faculty coach, (left) and chief surgical resident Matthew Singer, MD, represented Cedars-Sinai at the Battle of the Blades.

Had it been a prize fight, the referee would have stopped it in the first round. The Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery's debate team defeated Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in a debate at the American College of Surgeons chapter meeting this month in Santa Barbara.

Cedars-Sinai also won the Tanzini trophy as the best of the eight teams in the chapter meeting's Battle of the Blades debate series.

The issue that pitted Cedars-Sinai against Kaiser Permanente's Fontana facility was the timing of surgery in a patient with a small-bowel obstruction. It was a battle between outmoded surgical concepts and the synthesis of currently available laboratory and imaging testing.

Led by chief surgical resident Matthew Singer, MD, the Cedars-Sinai team argued that current modalities allow the surgeon to make a more informed and medically accurate decision for surgery. Singer wove an eloquent argument for discarding rigid surgical orthodoxy applicable in 1915 but not 2015. His themes were an aging population with associated morbidities, the risk of enterotomies and the overall risks of emergent surgery.

The meeting took place Jan. 16-18.

Related story:

Cedars-Sinai Retains Surgical Jeopardy Title

Gewertz's New Book for Physicians Discusses Leadership

A new book by Bruce Gewertz, MD, is designed to help physicians improve their leadership skills.

Gewertz, Cedars-Sinai surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery, wrote The Best Medicine: A Physician's Guide to Effective Leadership with Dave C. Logan, PhD, co-founder and president of the management consulting firm CultureSync, a faculty member at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business and a New York Times best-selling author.

The book provides a theoretical framework for visionary leadership as well as management techniques to achieve success. The authors focus on maintaining a consistent set of behavioral characteristics for the leader and the organization.

The text uses the authors' personal experiences along with case studies to illustrate the principles and practices of successful leaders.

For more information about the book, visit its website.

A Very Successful Joint Commission Survey

From Mark R. Gavens, Senior Vice President, Clinical Care Services, and Chief Operating Officer
Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, Vice President, Nursing, and Chief Nursing Officer

Once again, you have demonstrated your passion, teamwork and commitment to our patients and community during last month's successful Joint Commission (TJC) survey.

Six surveyors from TJC spent five full days conducting a comprehensive review of the delivery of patient care and related critical services within the medical center. The survey team was composed of two physicians, two nurses, a life safety engineer and an ambulatory care specialist. They audited our compliance with the several thousand TJC standards, conducted 30 patient "tracers" and 70 medical record reviews, visited more than 75 operating areas and held discussions with hundreds of our staff and patients.

While we will not receive a final accreditation decision for several months, based on comments by the surveyors at the closing conference as well as the preliminary written report, we can share that it was a very successful survey. The surveyors consistently remarked on the exemplary performance of the organization, the exceptional programs in place to care for complex patients and, most importantly, the high level of engagement and pride demonstrated by the staff.

We will be reviewing recommendations made by TJC and the surveyors in the weeks ahead. Some may require further discussions with TJC before a final report is issued, while others will likely require our submitting additional information. A complete summary of the final findings will be provided at your upcoming staff meetings.

Accreditation is but one of the many processes we have in place at Cedars-Sinai that provide insight into our daily operations and systems, and help validate our continuous improvement efforts. Thank you for your efforts that every day deliver outstanding care to our patients and communities.

CS-Link Tip: Web Activities

On the top tool bar of CS-Link™, you will find Web Activities. In case you haven't clicked it recently, it is worth a look.

Have you ever needed to print a form such as Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment or the Department of Motor Vehicles application for a disabled permit? Have you ever questioned what a resulting lab has in a specific panel? The links to this information are under Web Activities.

These often-needed resources are at your fingertips. Using Web Activities is quicker and easier than leaving CS-Link to search the internet, and this tool keeps getting better.

You can learn more by visiting CS-Link Central or by scheduling a training session with Lisa Masson, MD, (lisa.masson@cshs.org) Shaun Miller, MD, (shaun.miller@cshs.org) or Alex Bram (alex.bram@cshs.org).

Click here for more CS-Link training updates for physicians.

Open House Jan. 29 Celebrates Transplant Center

The Comprehensive Transplant Center houses administrative and clinical services for liver, kidney, pancreas and lung transplant patients.

All employees, volunteers and medical staff members are invited to a celebration of the new Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center on Thursday, Jan. 29, from 7-10 a.m.

The open house will include a breakfast, remarks, tours and gift giveaway.

Shuttle service to and from the Comprehensive Transplant Center, 8900 Beverly Blvd., will be provided in front of the North Tower from 6:45-10:30 a.m.

The Comprehensive Transplant Center houses administrative and clinical services for liver, kidney, pancreas and lung transplant patients. The new center includes 12,000 square feet of clinic space, 22 exam rooms, a three-bay phlebotomy room and infusion therapy services.

For more information, contact Fayne Pitts-Willliams at williamsfx@cshs.org or 323-866-8139.

Previously in Sutures:

New Outpatient Transplant Center to Open Soon (August 2014)

Conference on Sinus, Eustachian Tube Surgery Is March 28

A conference on sinus and eustachian tube surgery will take place Saturday, March 28, from 7:15 a.m.-5 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

The conference will provide participants with the latest information on technological advances and innovative approaches to sinus surgery and other rapidly changing aspects of otolaryngological care.

Objectives of the conference:

  • Evaluate effective treatments and diagnostic modalities that can be used for patients suffering with sinusitis and other nasal diseases and disorders to improve their quality of life
  • Identify patients who are appropriate candidates for advanced sinus surgery techniques
  • Discuss new technology and instruments to improve treatment of sinus disease
  • Discuss the latest management strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic otitis media, including balloon catheter dilation of the nasopharyngeal orifice of the eustachian tube

The course director is Martin L. Hopp, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Sinus Center. Sinus Center otolaryngologists on the planning committee are:

  • Matthew L. Finerman, MD
  • Garrett D. Herzon, MD
  • Daryoush D. Saadat, MD
  • Arthur Wu, MD

Click here for more information or to register.

Cedars-Sinai Doctors Help Chinese Surgeons Go Solo

After learning from the Cedars-Sinai team led by Philip Frykman, MD, (in yellow cap) Chinese surgeons are now performing anorectal surgeries on their own.

On their first medical mission to central China in 2011 to help orphans with anorectal malformations, Cedars-Sinai physicians and nurses performed life-saving surgeries that local doctors had never seen before. Last fall, thanks to a series of innovations the team has implemented since then, Chinese surgeons and nurses were handling similar cases on their own.

"It was a huge learning curve," said Philip Frykman, MD, associate director of Pediatric Surgery at Cedars-Sinai and the leader of the China mission team. "We're now very close to reaching the goal of sustainable missions, which means that the Chinese doctors and nurses will be able to work alone and teach these procedures to others."

Although the surgery they perform, known as PSARP (posterior sagittal anorectoplasty), is considered routine throughout the U.S., it is rarely performed in China. As a result, children who lack a functional rectum or anus at birth routinely die of complications such as sepsis or malnutrition.

Frykman and some of his colleagues during a recent mission to China. From left are volunteer Mickie Wang, Shiwei Zhai, MD, of the New Hope Foundation, Claire Esguerra, LVN, of Cedars-Sinai, Frykman and Drs. Yang and Liu, pediatric surgeons from the Luoyang Children's Hospital.

From the start, Frykman and his colleagues — including pediatric anesthesiologist Keith Kimble, MD, and Janet Kimble, RN, CPN — knew the most effective way to help the orphans was to teach the necessary techniques and procedures to the local doctors and nurses. Frykman and Shiwei Zhai, MD, quickly developed a strong working relationship, which allowed the American surgeon to teach and guide his Chinese colleague. Janet Kimble forged bonds with nursing leaders from Chinese hospitals where the Cedars-Sinai team worked over the years.

In the second year of the missions, as the Cedars-Sinai team began holding seminars, word quickly spread. Chinese doctors, nurses and medical personnel from throughout the region filled the lecture halls and operating rooms. Soon, knowledge of the techniques for dealing with anorectal malformations began to be shared widely.

Then, with an ingenious invention, Frykman and Keith Kimble supplied the final piece of the puzzle. They created and manufactured a low-cost version of the Peña muscle stimulator, a costly medical device crucial to performing anorectal surgeries that is beyond the budgets of hospitals in developing nations. Chinese surgical teams finally had both the knowledge and the tools to work on their own.

During the 2013 mission, two Chinese surgeons successfully performed the PSARP with Cedars-Sinai physicians in the operating room. That prepared the local doctors and nurses to perform the procedure on their own, which they did during the Americans' 2014 visit.

Because of the high number of cases and because the team had only four days to operate, Frykman said, "we decided to run two operating rooms."

Cedars-Sinai team members staffed one O.R. in which they tackled more advanced cases. The Chinese doctors and nurses worked in a neighboring O.R., doing PSARP procedures.

"When we first showed them the surgeries we wanted them to do, there was hesitation," Frykman said. "I would get them started and would be there to help if they needed it, but after a few cases, it was clear that wasn't necessary."

Working solo with Frykman close by gave the Chinese surgeons confidence. By the end of the four days, the local medical teams were handling the PSARP procedures by themselves.

As a result, the Cedars-Sinai team was now free to work on more complex cases, such as children with Hirschsprung's disease, a disorder in which nerve cells are missing from part or all of an infant's colon. To pinpoint the portion of the colon to be removed, a biopsy must be performed during the operation.

In the U.S., this would be a simple matter of sending a tissue sample to the hospital's own lab, Frykman said. But because the Chinese hospital didn't offer that service, the tissue sample had to be rushed through the city of 6.5 million people to a hospital across town, all while the patient remained under anesthesia.

"While this type of attention to detail and effort to be precise is virtually unheard of in the Chinese medical system, it did provide an example to our Chinese colleagues of how much better Hirschsprung surgery could be performed for patients if pathology is obtained during surgery, as is routinely performed in the U.S. and Europe," Frykman said.

Another boost to the teaching component of the mission came thanks to the loan of laparoscopic and exoscopic equipment by a local company. As a result, the surgeries were displayed on high-definition monitors for real-time teaching, and they were recorded for training videos.

"Over the past four years, the focus has definitely changed with a greater emphasis on consulting and teaching," Janet Kimble said. "We started out physically doing all of the care for the children, and now we've been one of the first groups to create sustainable care."

In addition to Frykman, Keith Kimble and Janet Kimble, members of the 2014 Cedars-Sinai team were:

  • Pediatric Intensive Care Unit nurses Jennifer Ross, RN, CN III, Mona Abney, RN, CN III, and Rebecca Ehling, RN
  • The operating room team of Claire Esguerra, LVN, surgical tech III, and Naty Portugal, RN, CN IV
  • Surgical resident Doug Liou, MD

Pediatric anesthesiologist Keith Kimble, MD, (right) has been a member of the Cedars-Sinai team since the first mission to Luoyang, China, in 2011.

Previously in Sutures:

Cedars-Sinai Innovation Helps Patients in China (February 2014)

Cedars-Sinai Surgical Team Expands Mission in China (January 2013)

P & T Approvals, FDA Warning About Ziprasidone

Pharmacy Focus

Highlights of the Dec. 2 meeting of the Cedars-Sinai Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee are summarized in the PDF link below. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned that the antipsychotic drug ziprasidone is associated with a rare but serious skin reaction.

P & T Approvals - December 2014 (PDF)

FDA: Ziprasidone Associated With Rare, Potentially Fatal Skin Reaction

The antipsychotic drug ziprasidone (marketed under the brand name Geodon and its generics) is associated with a rare but serious skin reaction that can progress to affect other parts of the body, according to the FDA. The condition known as Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) can lead to death, according to the agency.

For more information, click here.

Circle of Friends Honorees for December

The Circle of Friends program honored 316 people in December.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Nara Abouchian, LVN
  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Felicitas M. Acosta
  • Caleb Adams
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Ria Aldanese, RN
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, RN, MN, AOCN
  • John P. Andreas
  • John B. Andrews, MD
  • Mane Arabyan
  • Pedrina Arguera
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • M. William Audeh, MD
  • Laura G. Audell, MD, MS
  • Mark J. Ault, MD
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • Yalda Azarmehr, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Shrinath Barathan, MD
  • Eli Baron, MD
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Daniel S. Berman, MD
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Donna M. Bias, BSN, RN
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Mary Grace Brandon, RN, ACNP-BC
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Eileen G. Brown, OCN, RN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Priscilla Campbell, RN
  • Lori Canaday, RN
  • David S. Cannom, MD
  • Neyra Cannon, CNA
  • Jeffrey F. Caren, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Rhona M. Castillo, RN
  • Bojan Cercek, MD, PhD
  • Michael L. Chaikin, MD
  • Christopher Chang, MD, PhD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Cheryl G. Charles, MD
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Connie Chein, MD
  • Irene E. Chen, MD
  • Wen Cheng, MD
  • Tony B. Chiang, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Lily Y. Chun, RN
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Janet M. Clarke-Platt, RN
  • J. Louis Cohen, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Robert T. Coles, MD
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Antonio Hernandez Conte, MD
  • Terence T. Cook Jr.
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Smada U. Couch
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Mark M. Davidson, MD
  • Ryan Michael S. De La Merced, BSN, RN
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Jeannie M. Decuir
  • Maria L. Delioukina, MD
  • Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD
  • Ma Charisma Joy Dondonay
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Ricardo Duarte
  • Brian Dubow, MD
  • Sadokat D. Dusbekova, RN
  • Alan Engelberg, MD
  • Sari Eshman
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • David Esquith, LCSW, MPA, ACM
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Jeannifer W. Estrada, RN
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Leon G. Fine, MD
  • Christopher R. Fitzgerald, MD
  • Katherine J. Fogg
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Steven S. Galen, MD
  • Marielle H. Garalza, RN
  • Elayne K. Garber, MD
  • Avrom Gart, MD
  • Cyril Gaultier, MD
  • Dael Geft, MD
  • Alexander Gershman, MD
  • Mitch Gheorghiu, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Eskedar F. Gobeze, RN, BSN
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • David B. Golden, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Mark O. Goodarzi, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Robert A. Gross, MD
  • Behrooz Hakimian, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Jaryd James Hochberger
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Martin L. Hopp, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Leonel A. Hunt, MD
  • Carole H. Hurvitz, MD
  • Asma Hussaini, MS, PA-C
  • May Isbell, OD
  • Steven J. Jacobs, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Colleen C. Juban, RN
  • Peter Julien, MD
  • Steven Kamara, MD
  • David J. Kanani, MD
  • Ashley Kaplan, RN
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Dan Katz, MD
  • Sanjay Kaul, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Walter F. Kerwin, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Elizabeth M. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Patricia Emmett Kittell
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Ellen B. Klapper, MD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Keith L. Klein, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Robert Koblin, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Brenda E. Laabs, RN
  • Babak Larian, MD
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Barbara R. Leanse, BSW
  • Caroline Lee, MD
  • Fredene L. Legayada, RN
  • Madeline S. Lerman, BSN, RN
  • Keren Lerner, MD
  • Roger L. Lerner, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael M. Levine, MD
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Meldon C. Levy, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Aliza A. Lifshitz, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Joseph Loewy, MD
  • Patrick D. Lyden, MD
  • James F. MacDonald, BSN, RN, MPH
  • Fataneh Majlessipour, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Neel K. Mann, MD
  • Malcolm L. Margolin, MD
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • David N. Matsumura, MD
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Dermot McGovern, MD, PhD
  • Kathleen McKenna
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Shlomo Melmed, MD
  • Richard J. Metz, MD
  • Kiarash Michel, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Alain Mita, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Nancy Moldawer
  • Rocio Molina
  • Avinash Mondkar, MD
  • Melvin T. Monsher, MD
  • Charles N. Moon, MD
  • Marichele Ivy Morales, RN
  • Amelia F. Morallos
  • Guinevere D. Moran, BSN, RN-C
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Zuri Murrell, MD
  • Arby Nahapetian, MD, MPH
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Paul W. Noble, MD
  • Edward Kazuhisa Nomoto, MD
  • Sara Oliva, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Katayoun Omrani, DDS
  • Amy Oppenheim
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Shi-Hui Pan, PharmD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Barry J. Pearlman, MD
  • Jacob B. Pelta, MD
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Howard E. Pitchon, MD
  • Maria C. Ponferrada-Encarnado, RN
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Dechu P. Puliyanda, MD
  • Graciela Y. Quan
  • Stephen C. Rabin, MD
  • Shervin Rabizadeh, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Jessica Redin, NP
  • Richard M. Ress, MD
  • R. L. Patrick Rhoten, MD
  • Jennifer Lynn Roquet, RN
  • Robert M. Rose, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Karen A. Ross, RN
  • Jay S. Rudin, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Ruth "Virginia" Russell, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Wendy L. Sacks, MD
  • Justin D. Saliman, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Margaret C. Sanford, MD
  • Aaron M. Savar, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Jessica L. Schneider, MD
  • Irwin Segal
  • Scott Serden, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Omid A. Shaye, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Stuart L. Silverman, MD
  • Amanuel Sima, MD
  • Charles F. Simmons, MD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Liliana Sloninsky, MD
  • Aretha P. Smith
  • Christine C. Snell, BS
  • Thomas P. Sokol, MD
  • Richard Sokolov, MD
  • Karyn Morse Solky, MD
  • Shlee S. Song, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Jay J. Stein, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Carey B. Strom, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Ping "Alison" S. Tan, RN
  • Stephan R. Targan, MD
  • Desiree F. Thomas, RN
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Shirin Towfigh, MD
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Diane M. Tryciecky, RN
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Brian Tyler, LVN
  • Dimitrios Tzachanis, MD, PhD
  • Stefan A. Unterhalter, MD, MB
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Suketu B. Vaishnav, MD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Angela Velleca, BSN, RN, CCTC
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Anna Volkov, RN
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • George Watts, MS, CCP
  • Alan Weinberger, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Vidaflor A. Westlake
  • Kenyetta Wilson
  • Robert N. Wolfe, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Philip A. Yalowitz, MD
  • Evan M. Zahn, MD
  • Christopher Zarembinski, MD
  • Millard H. Zisser, MD