sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY March 2015 | Archived Issues

P & T Approvals, FDA Warnings About Testosterone Products, Treanda, Chantix

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the February meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued warnings about prescription testosterone products, Treanda and Chantix.

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Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

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Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

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Buss Donation Endows Surgical Oncology Fellowship

Jeanie Buss, president and governor of the Los Angeles Lakers, has donated $1.5 million to establish an endowed fellowship, the Dr. Jerry H. Buss Surgical Oncology Fellow, in honor of her late father and in appreciation of the work of Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Improves Professorial Structure

The Cedars-Sinai professorial structure has been enhanced. These changes will better recognize individuals who make sustained and significant contributions to clinical scholarship and important contributions to collaborative research projects.

» Read more

Lin to Present Orthopedic Research at National Meeting

Carol A. Lin, MD, a faculty physician with the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center, will present her research on acetabular fractures March 25 at the national meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in Las Vegas. See a summary of her findings.

» Read more

SICU Can Be Right Choice for Critically Ill Patients

By Eric Ley, MD, Director, Surgical Intensive Care Unit

If you have a critically ill surgical patient who requires a higher level of care, consider the Cedars-Sinai Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). The unit provides state-of-the-art treatment to more than 1,800 patients each year. To discuss a patient, you can phone a surgical critical care fellow anytime at 310-423-7430.

» Read more

Recognition for Arena, Charlton

Physician News

Elizabeth A. Arena, MD, has been awarded board certification in complex general surgical oncology, and Timothy P. Charlton, MD, represented the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons this month in Washington.

» Read more

Trauma Conference for Nurses Filled to Capacity

The Cedars-Sinai Trauma Program met one of its longtime goals in January by hosting a trauma conference for Cedars-Sinai nurses. The Jan. 20 conference provided actionable and thought-provoking information to help nurses exemplify best practices at this Level I trauma hospital. A capacity audience of 70 nurses attended the conference.

» Read more

Impact of Weight-Loss Surgery May Depend on Bacteria

Some patients do not experience the optimal weight loss from bariatric surgery, and the cause may be a specific methane-producing organism in the gastrointestinal tract, according to new research by Ruchi Mathur, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Anna and Max Webb and Family Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center.
 

» Read more

Surgery in Simulation Center Has Real Effect on Teamwork

For the team working on the surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect in the Cedars-Sinai Women's Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills, the focus was on the infant "patient" — a life-size, computer-controlled mannequin. But no matter how technically dazzling the mannequin was, the surgical team approached it simply as a tool for reaching a crucial goal: to improve patient safety by working as a seamless unit.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

The Circle of Friends program honored 145 people in February. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Buss Donation Endows Surgical Oncology Fellowship

Jeanie Buss, president and governor of the Los Angeles Lakers, has donated $1.5 million to establish an endowed fellowship, the Dr. Jerry H. Buss Surgical Oncology Fellow, in honor of her late father and in appreciation of the work of Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD.

Silberman is the Robert J. and Suzanne Gottlieb Endowed Chair in Surgical Oncology and co-director of the Cedars-Sinai Surgical Oncology Fellowship program.

Cedars-Sinai is one of only 19 programs in the country with a fellowship program in complex surgical oncology that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The fellowship is a two-year program that will be supported in perpetuity by the Buss endowment.

Jerry H. Buss, PhD, is best known for his ownership of the Los Angeles Lakers, who won 10 NBA championships during his tenure. He was enshrined into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

He received a bachelor of science in 2½ years from the University of Wyoming. By age 24, Buss had earned a master's and doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Southern California. In 2008, Buss endowed two chairs in the Department of Chemistry at USC and endowed a scholarship fund for chemistry graduate students.

Buss became interested in Silberman's study of patients with multiple primary cancers. While in residence, fellows will perform research into multiple malignancy as well as other research projects.

Cedars-Sinai Improves Professorial Structure

The Cedars-Sinai professorial structure has been enhanced. These changes will better recognize individuals who make sustained and significant contributions to clinical scholarship and important contributions to collaborative research projects.

The research-based Professorial Series and the clinical-educator-based Clinical Professorial Series have been restructured into three tracks:

  • Physician/PhD investigator: requiring high-quality basic or translational research, and extramural, peer-reviewed federal or national funding
  • Clinical scholar: requiring significant clinical scholarship exemplified by impactful publications, innovative clinical trials programs, educational outcomes research or creation of innovative biotechnologies
  • Clinical educator: requiring documentation of high-quality clinical service and exemplary teaching and educational leadership

Academic Human Resources is offering workshops to provide administrators and faculty with the opportunity to learn more about these enhancements. Workshops are scheduled for:

  • Monday, March 30, noon-1 p.m., Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, PEC 8
  • Tuesday, March 31, noon-1 p.m., Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, PEC 1

For additional information, please see the Academic Human Resources site on the Intranet.

To read the full memo about this change from Shlomo Melmed, MD, senior vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the medical faculty, and Bruce Gewertz, MD, surgeon-in-chief, chair of the Department of Surgery, vice president for Interventional Services and vice dean of Academic Affairs, please click the PDF link below.

Cedars-Sinai Professorial Structure Enhancements (PDF)

Lin to Present Orthopedic Research at National Meeting

Carol A. Lin, MD

Carol A. Lin, MD, a faculty physician with the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center, will present her research on acetabular fractures March 25 at the national meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in Las Vegas. Her findings are summarized below.

Acetabular fractures are complex injuries, and treatments have evolved considerably over the past century. Prior to the development of modern implants for fracture fixation, these injuries were treated with bed rest and traction, often leading to debilitating hip arthritis. In recent decades, advances in implant technology and understanding of functional anatomy have allowed us to achieve good to excellent functional outcome in up to 80 percent of patients at 20 years with open reduction internal fixation.

However, many patients suffer early failures requiring a hip replacement within two years of the injury. Current research is focused on identifying which patients are at risk for early failure and how to prevent the need for additional surgeries. In these situations, it may be best to replace the joint immediately, rather than try to fix it. (Figure 1 below) Until now, the discussion has focused primarily on geriatric patients who are unlikely to wear out the artificial joint.

But what about the nongeriatric patient with a high-risk fracture pattern? As total-hip technology continues to improve, total-hip arthroplasty in primary osteoarthritis is being performed more frequently in patients in their 50s with excellent longevity and a low complication rate, and as such, its use in acetabular fractures may provide a benefit to these younger patients.

To investigate this question, we reviewed the charts of 16 patients under 65 years old who underwent total-hip arthroplasty for acetabular fractures and compared them to 32 patients of similar age and fracture pattern. We analyzed length of stay, complication rate, functional outcome and reoperation rates. Patients who underwent immediate hip arthroplasty had lower rates of reoperation than those who underwent traditional internal fixation. (Figure 2 below) This finding was statistically significant.

Ultimately, our study shows that, with appropriate patient selection, immediate total hip arthroplasty can provide good functional outcomes with complication rates similar to traditional internal fixation. Arthroplasty in high-risk fracture patterns also may reduce the likelihood of needing a second surgery in certain patients. While our sample size was small, it is the first to provide a direct comparison between the two treatment methods and lays the groundwork for future prospective investigations. With this information, we hope to continue to improve the outcomes of patients with these challenging injuries.

Figure 1: Example of an associated anterior column and posterior hemitransverse fracture with displacement of the anterior column and dome impaction and medial displacement of the femoral head. Part A — anteroposterior and Judet views of the injury. Note the displacement of the anterior column with a large step-off at the pelvic brim (arrows) on the obturator oblique projection (lower left). There is moderate displacement of the posterior column on the iliac oblique projection (lower right). Part B — after OFIR with a plate placed through the lateral window of the ilioinguinal approach used to reduce and buttress the anterior column.

Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier survival curve of the index surgery comparing acute or immediate total-hip arthroplasty (THA) versus traditional open reduction internal fixation (ORIF)

SICU Can Be Right Choice for Critically Ill Patients

By Eric Ley, MD
Director, Surgical Intensive Care Unit

If you have a critically ill surgical patient who requires a higher level of care, consider the Cedars-Sinai Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). The unit provides state-of-the-art treatment to more than 1,800 patients each year.

To discuss a patient, you can phone a surgical critical care fellow anytime at 310-423-7430. SICU fellows complete a one-year surgical critical care program approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

We train leaders in academic surgical critical care through an intensive clinical and educational experience. Two surgical fellows are accepted annually, and we have a 100 percent pass rate for board certification dating back to 2008. Our fellows this year are David Hoang, GL4, and Jason Murry, GL6.

The SICU is managed 24 hours a day by in-house faculty from the Acute Care Surgery Service. All of our attendings are boarded in Surgery and Surgical Critical Care. Morning rounds begin at 8 a.m., afternoon rounds are at 3 p.m., and evening rounds occur after 6 p.m. The SICU attending decides if the admission or stay is appropriate.

Prior to patient admission, the primary team must discuss a plan of care with the SICU team; this is especially important for patients admitted from the operating room due to rapid changes that occur during the immediate post-operative period. The SICU team is not an admitting service, so the H/P and admission orders are generated by the primary team. After patient admission, all orders are signed off by the SICU team, so to avoid delays, it is important to communicate your plan with the team.

If a patient deteriorates and emergent care is immediately required, the SICU team is a terrific resource. We can guide critical care prior to SICU admission and, as each attending is surgically trained, can assist in the O.R. The immediate availability of a surgical intensivist 24 hours a day can be especially helpful for after-hours assistance.

Recognition for Arena, Charlton

Physician News

Arena Earns Certification in Complex General Surgical Oncology

Elizabeth A. Arena, MD, has been awarded board certification in complex general surgical oncology from the American Board of Surgery (ABS).

Arena is the first surgeon at Cedars-Sinai to achieve board certification in the increasingly complex field of surgical oncology. She is an attending-level surgeon in the Department of Surgery.

ABS established the specialty board to develop surgeons with specific knowledge of the diagnosis, multidisciplinary treatment and rehabilitation of patients with unusual or complex cancers.

The certification process in complex general surgical oncology measures the surgeon's judgment, clinical reasoning skills and problem-solving ability. The oral certifying examination assesses the technical details of oncologic operations as well as issues related to the surgeon's ethical behavior and humanistic qualities.

Arena, a graduate of Dartmouth College and the New York University School of Medicine, completed her surgical residency at the Yale-New Haven Hospital.

Timothy P. Charlton, MD, and patient advocate Peg Cagle in front of the Capitol

Charlton Represents AAOS in Advocacy Trip to Capitol

Timothy P. Charlton, MD, represented the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) this month in Washington. He was among dozens of physicians, researchers and patient advocates who visited Senate and House offices to petition for increased funding for research by the National Institutes of Health.

The goal of AAOS Research Capitol Hill Day was to increase research funding to $32 billion for fiscal year 2016, Charlton said.

Charlton is a foot and ankle surgeon with the Cedars-Sinai Orthopaedic Center.

Trauma Conference for Nurses Filled to Capacity

The Cedars-Sinai Trauma Program met one of its longtime goals in January by hosting a trauma conference for Cedars-Sinai nurses. The Jan. 20 conference provided actionable and thought-provoking information to help nurses exemplify best practices at this Level I trauma hospital.

A capacity audience of 70 nurses attended the conference.

Presentations addressed issues surrounding trauma resuscitation. Speakers discussed pre-hospital care, management of massive hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, blast wounds, special populations and the significance of disaster drills.

Among the participants in the conference were Cedars-Sinai trauma surgeons Nicolas Melo, MD, Rex Chung, MD, and Rodrigo Alban, MD, along with Daniel Margulies, MD, section chief of Trauma and Acute Care Services.

The international speaker was Kathleen Martin, MSN, RN, who was trauma nurse director at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany during much of the Iraq War. Landstuhl is the closest receiving trauma hospital for injured U.S. troops as they are transported from the field in Iraq.

A second conference with greater capacity is expected to take place next year.

Impact of Weight-Loss Surgery May Depend on Bacteria

The benefits of weight-loss surgery, along with a treatment plan that includes exercise and dietary changes, are well documented. In addition to a significant decrease in body mass, many patients find their risk factors for heart disease are drastically lowered and blood sugar regulation is improved for those with Type 2 diabetes.

Some patients, however, do not experience the optimal weight loss from bariatric surgery. The presence of a specific methane gas-producing organism in the gastrointestinal tract may account for a decrease in optimal weight loss, according to new research by Ruchi Mathur, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Anna and Max Webb and Family Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center.

"We looked at 156 obese adults who either had Roux-en-Y bypass surgery or received a gastric sleeve. Four months after surgery, we gave them a breath test, which provides a way of measuring gases produced by microbes in the gut," Mathur said. "We found that those whose breath test revealed higher concentrations of both methane and hydrogen were the ones who had the lowest percentage of weight loss and lowest reduction in BMI (body mass index) when compared to others in the study."

The methane-producing microorganism methanobrevibacter smithii is the biggest maker of methane in the gut, Mathur said, and it may be the culprit thwarting significant weight loss in bariatric patients. Mathur and her colleagues are conducting further studies to explore the role this organism plays in human metabolism.

While that research continues, bariatric patients may still have options to improve weight loss after surgery.

"Identifying individuals with this pattern of intestinal gas production may allow for interventions through diet. In the future, there may be therapeutic drugs that can improve a patient's post-surgical course and help them achieve optimal weight loss," Mathur said.

The study, "Intestinal Methane Production is Associated with Decreased Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery," was done in collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. Mathur presented the paper this month at the 97th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego.

Surgery in Simulation Center Has Real Effect on Teamwork

The "patient" in the simulation was a life-size, computer-controlled mannequin.

For the team working on the surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect in the Cedars-Sinai Women's Guild Simulation Center for Advanced Clinical Skills, the focus was on the tiny "patient."

The infant was a life-size, computer-controlled mannequin, anatomically correct from its synthetic skin (complete with fat and fascia planes) to its articulated joints, sculpted bones, and pliable muscles and tendons; and from its respiratory system that "breathed" to its circulatory system that maintained blood pressure and pumped ersatz blood. The mannequin's heart had holes between its upper chambers, and another between its lower chambers (atrial and ventricular septal defects).

But no matter how technically dazzling the mannequin was, the surgical team approached it simply as a tool for reaching a crucial goal: to improve patient safety in the complex and fast-paced environment of cardiac surgery by working as a seamless unit.

"The challenge is that we are all exceptionally well-trained as individual practitioners, but too often the integration of the individual into team delivery of healthcare is poorly done," said Alistair Phillips, MD, co-director of the Guerin Family Congenital Heart Program and chief of the division of Congenital Heart Surgery at Cedars-Sinai.

"The beauty of the sim center is that it has real, live information that is communicated to us exactly as we would see it in the O.R.," said Alistair Phillips, MD (left).

"We all agree that the No. 1 focus is a healthy child at the end of surgery," Phillips said. "Along the road to getting there, though, we each have different goals that we personally think are the most important."

According to a report by the American Heart Association published in August 2013, most preventable surgical errors in cardiac operating rooms arose not from failures in technical skills but from breakdowns in teamwork and communication.

To address these potential communication failures, and to give the Congenital Heart Program's surgical team a real-time, high-stakes arena in which to practice, Phillips turned to the Women's Guild Simulation Center, commonly referred to as the sim center.

The sim center includes two operating rooms, an intensive care unit, an Ob-Gyn room, a trauma bay and a neonatal intensive care unit. All are fully functioning and, when needed, can be pressed into immediate service. Each environment is connected to one of two control rooms, where technicians use computers to create and control an infinite range of medical scenarios for teaching or practice purposes.

Phillips designed a simulation in which an infant exhibiting symptoms of failure to thrive undergoes surgery for repair of a large ventricular septal defect. Working with Russell Metcalfe Smith, the sim center's manager, Phillips crafted a meticulous scenario for the surgery and a subsequent scenario for the Congenital Cardiac Intensive Care Unit.

"We had a prototype congenital heart baby designed specifically for the scenario, which makes it that much more immersive for the people in the O.R.," Metcalfe Smith said. "It takes a significant amount of time for a team to learn to function together, which is why simulations like this need to take place on a regular basis."

Phillips' approach to honing the congenital cardiac team's interpersonal skills starts with erasing traditional hierarchical markers. To his team he is "Alistair," not "Dr. Phillips," a distinction he believes makes it easier for team members to participate fully in discussions and critiques.

Each simulation begins with a "pre-brief," a document that lays out each participant's goals for the surgery, the order in which the surgery will proceed, and the after-care duties of nursing staff.

"We start with a team huddle" in which the team members state the goal and the procedures by which the goal will be met, Phillips said.

In the simulation with the infant mannequin, the goal was the closure of the septal defect with a Gore-Tex patch, the surgical procedure was a sternotomy, and the main concern was ensuring that all holes (known medically as shunts) were closed to control postoperative bleeding and improve heart function. After the anesthesiologist, perfusionist, O.R. nursing team and ICU teams stated their goals and procedures, the team was ready to begin.

Each environment in the sim center is connected to a control room, where technicians use computers to create and control an infinite range of medical scenarios for teaching or practice purposes.

In the sim center's operating room, with team members scrubbed in and gowned, the surgery proceeded in real time. As the mannequin's heart was stopped and circulatory function moved to bypass, the perfusionist quietly answered queries about heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the operating room's large window, Metcalfe Smith and his team huddled over a bank of keyboards, monitors and readouts.

Planning for this simulation took a few weeks. Setting up the operating room, which included programming the scenario, took 72 hours. As the operation proceeded, the sim center team made sure that each step of the surgery, including prearranged complications for the O.R. team to react to, was executed as planned.

"What makes this special is the collection of professionals running through the sequence, training together to perfect the surgical experience," Metcalfe Smith said. "When you're all training together, when you're continually working toward a common goal, then you can improve communication, which has a significant impact on safety and outcomes."

After surgery, the patient was prepared for transport and then transferred to the ICU, where the team handoff is conducted. The handoff is a crucial part of the medical care transition — the operating room team has to efficiently and accurately communicate what is going on with the patient. Cedars-Sinai has found that an enhanced handoff can dramatically reduce medical care issue during the first 24 hours after surgery, improving patient safety.

In the ICU, the team was tested with changing clinical scenarios that allow for very unusual but potentially very harmful clinical events.

After the procedure, Phillips and the O.R. and ICU teams met in a conference room for a step he considers as important as the surgery itself — the debriefing. Seated in a circle, team members asked and answered questions and raised issues they encountered during the simulation.

The general consensus from the surgical team: The simulation went well.

Discussion included technical glitches for the sim center team to deal with before the next simulation, and ways the surgical team could improve. From seemingly small changes, such as moving a medical device a few inches, to refining the information to offer when asked a direct question, the Congenital Heart Program's surgical team honed its approach.

In congenital heart surgery, where at any one time 10 people may be taking care of a patient, the team trumps the individual, Phillips said.

"After the scenario, you can adjust where people stand, change the position of the bypass machine, adjust where the scrub nurse stands in relation to the surgeon, and you get to see how each change affects communication," Phillips said. "The beauty of the sim center is that it has real, live information that is communicated to us exactly as we would see it in the O.R., and we can, in the safest way, review how it affects the patient."

The goal of the simulation was to improve patient safety through better teamwork.

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

The Circle of Friends program honored 145 people in February.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Krystianne Nigel Abrenica, RN
  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Melinda A. Adams, BSN, RN, RN-C
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Maryam Ahmadian, MSN, RN, NP
  • Shahzad Ahmed, MD
  • Howard N. Allen, MD
  • Erica A. Alvarado, BSN, RN
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • Alagappan Annamalai, MD
  • Gary R. Appel, RN, PCCN
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Maria Belinda Brant, BSN, RN-BC, CCTC
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD
  • James L. Caplan, MD
  • Jeffrey F. Caren, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Sumeet S. Chugh, MD
  • Arnold C. Cinman, MD
  • Lina Cohen
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Itai Danovitch, MD
  • Mark M. Davidson, MD
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Bernadett Dela Cruz, RN
  • Ma. Charisma Joy Dondonay
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Karyn Eilber, MD
  • Michelle C. Eliazo
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Olivia Estudillo, RN BSN CPAN
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Eugene L. Fishman, MD
  • Arnold S. Friedman, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Avrom Gart, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Eli Ginsburg, MD
  • Theodore B. Goldstein, MD
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Stacey L. Handy, BSN, RN
  • Julius P. Har
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Jeremy R. Herman, MD
  • Martin L. Hopp, MD
  • Leonel A. Hunt, MD
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Joanna Juntila, RN
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD
  • Rosa B. Kassaseya
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Raj Khandwalla, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Greta Kiley, RN
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • David A. Kulber, MD
  • Carrie Langhans, RN
  • Monica S.Y. Lee, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Jamie Libo, RN
  • Charlene T. Lichtash, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Joanne Lutman, RN
  • Cheryle C. Maano-Requejo
  • James F. MacDonald, BSN, RN, MPH
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Kamran Matin, MD
  • Michael Casey McGuire
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Puja K. Mehta, MD
  • Dorothy T. Melvin
  • Leslie Memsic, MD
  • Hannah R. Meyer, RN
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Joel D. Mittleman, MD
  • Lastenia Carmen D. Moreno Esquer
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Carmelita S. Napiere
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Edward Kazuhisa Nomoto, MD
  • Sara Oliva, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Chirag G. Patil, MD
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Surasak Phuphanich, MD
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • R. L. Patrick Rhoten, MD
  • Digna E. Romero
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Farzin Samadi, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Avery I. Schwartz, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • John L. Sherman, MD
  • Chrisandra L. Shufelt, MD, MS
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • David S. Silver, MD
  • Amanuel Sima, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD
  • Kazu Suzuki, DPM
  • Bernadette Tingzon, BSN, RN, CPAN
  • Stephen P. Townsend, BSN, RN
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Stefan A. Unterhalter, MD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Kenyetta Wilson
  • Lauren M. Wilstein, RN
  • Jillian O. Wingate, BSN, RN
  • Elaine Winters
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • Payam R. Yashar, MD