sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY November 2015 | Archived Issues

P & T Approvals, FDA Warning About Hepatitis Drugs, Statement About Plavix

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the October meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released a warning regarding the risk of serious liver injury with use of hepatitis treatments Viekira Pak and Technivie, and the agency says long-term use of Plavix does not change the risk of death for patients with heart disease.

» Read more


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

» Read more


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF links below to see the Department of Surgery's education schedule.

Education Schedule - December 2015 (PDF)  


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

» Read more

Building New Solutions to Improve Patients' Lives

gewertz

Startup Competition is Part of Cedars-Sinai Initiative to Accelerate Innovation

It was a weekend of hard work and sleepless nights that began with about 35 entrepreneurs and startup enthusiasts — most of whom had just met — brainstorming about ways to improve healthcare. It ended with applause and high fives as seven teams pitched new business models they had designed during an intense 54 hours, with the goal of making life better for patients around the world.

» Read more

Cardiac Monitoring Policy Is Updated

In order to make beds with cardiac monitors available to more patients, Cedars-Sinai has adapted the 2004 American Heart Association cardiac monitoring guidelines for use as its policy concerning the utilization of cardiac monitoring of general medical-surgical adult inpatients.

» Read more

Two Minutes With …

This new question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the physicians in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. The first installment features Daniel Shouhed, MD, Ryan G. Spurrier, MD, and Marissa Srour, MD.

» Read more

Surgeon Scorecard: How Patients Choose a Physician

By Timothy J. Daskivich, MD, MSHPM
Director, Health Services Research, Department of Surgery

The wide variation in the quality of healthcare provided by physicians in the United States has prompted a call for more transparent reporting of individual physician performance to help consumers identify high quality providers. The medical community at large has been slow to respond, ostensibly due to concerns about accuracy and fairness of comparisons but also due to uncertainty about impact on the profession.

» Read more

Research to Improve Outcomes After Colorectal Surgery

By Karen Zaghiyan, MD, and Phillip Fleshner, MD
Division of Colorectal Surgery

Striving to improve the care we provide our patients, the Cedars-Sinai Division of Colorectal Surgery continues to focus on research investigating clinical outcomes after major colorectal surgery.

» Read more

OR 360 Wins Award from West Hollywood Chamber

Cedars-Sinai's OR 360 has won a Creative City Award from the West Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. The project won the chamber's Creative Concept Award, given to an operation that is "an innovator of a cool new concept, product or service."

» Read more

Innovation Challenge Selects 10 Semifinalists

innovation

As a part of the first MD/RN Patient Experience Innovation Challenge, more than 250 nurses and physicians came together last week to pitch collaborative solutions to improve the patient experience at Cedars-Sinai. After listening to an array of innovative ideas, the panel of six judges selected 10 semifinalist teams.

» Read about the semifinalists' solutions

Circle of Friends Honorees for October

COF Logo

The Circle of Friends program honored 193 people in October. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Building New Solutions to Improve Patients' Lives

Bruce L. Gewertz, MD, Cedars-Sinai surgeon-in-chief and chair of the Department of Surgery, (right) conferred with his fellow judges during Startup Weekend LA, Healthcare.

Startup Competition is Part of Cedars-Sinai Initiative to Accelerate Innovation

It was a weekend of hard work and sleepless nights that began with about 35 entrepreneurs and startup enthusiasts — most of whom had just met — brainstorming about ways to improve healthcare. It ended with applause and high fives as seven teams pitched new business models they had designed during an intense 54 hours, with the goal of making life better for patients around the world.

Between the beginning of the "Startup Weekend LA, Healthcare" event on Nov. 13 at a Cedars-Sinai facility and the final presentations on Nov. 15, individuals with very different skills and levels of experience took a deep dive into an intense, fast-paced process of transforming ideas into patient-centered healthcare solutions.

Omkar Kulkarni, MPH, Healthcare Innovation Accelerator director at Cedars-Sinai, helped organize the "idea competition" in collaboration with Techstars, a company that helps entrepreneurs around the world build successful businesses by providing support to accelerate the pace of innovation.

Among the participants were two Cedars-Sinai employees as well as a number of seasoned entrepreneurs and budding innovators. To enhance the educational value of the event, Kulkarni invited seven middle school students from the Incubator School in West Los Angeles, which provides early exposure to the experience of creating entrepreneurial ventures.

The students worked closely with the adults throughout the weekend. In fact, two 12-year-olds — along with Christina Yip, a data analyst in Cedars-Sinai Nursing Research and Development — were on the team that took first place.

The winning business models included a personalized patient education technology platform that earned the top prize — a chance to enter a video competition called the Global Startup Battle — as well as an online program to match licensed clinicians with healthcare facilities facing staff shortages and a one-stop online site that coordinates nonclinical services to help the elderly safely "age in place."

Bruce L. Gewertz, MD — surgeon-in-chief, chair of the Department of Surgery and the Harriet and Steven Nichols Distinguished Chair in Surgery — served on the judging panel along with Mandy Salzman, director at Techstars for Disney Accelerator, and Ash Kumra, Trade Kraft co-founder and CEO and a best-selling author. Gewertz is also vice president of Interventional Services and vice dean of Academic Affairs.

Throughout the weekend of brainstorming and business planning, mentors from Cedars-Sinai stopped by to share their healthcare expertise and offer business design guidance to the teams. Joseph Castongia, manager of Care Innovation and Design, said he was there to do for the startup teams what he does for Cedars-Sinai — help them "reimagine the way healthcare is delivered."

Castongia talked with the teams about the importance of understanding patients' emotions, attitudes and behaviors in order to come up with "human-centered" business models and solutions that will lead to a better healthcare experience as well as better health.

"It was interesting to see different types of people from the community come together to explore the possibilities of what the future of healthcare could look like — and to do so in a rapid-fire way that was really impressive," Castongia said. "The teams did an immense amount of work and came up with solid foundations for innovative products, services and solutions in just three days."

The weekend's activities are part of a broader Cedars-Sinai initiative to mentor entrepreneurial minds to drive breakthroughs in healthcare innovation. Cedars-Sinai recently announced a five-year partnership with Techstars to establish the Techstars Healthcare Accelerator in Partnership with Cedars-Sinai.

The three-month program, to be conducted annually, enables top healthcare technology entrepreneurs to grow their businesses with the help of funding and guidance provided by Cedars-Sinai leadership, clinicians and thought leaders, and by the Techstars network of more than 7,000 startup founders, mentors, investors and corporate partners. The accelerator program will accept 10-12 startup companies per class with pioneering ideas to improve the quality, safety and efficiency of health and healthcare delivery.

Gewertz, one of a number of Cedars-Sinai leaders who serve on the advisory board of the Techstars Healthcare Accelerator partnership, noted that Cedars-Sinai's commitment to mentoring creative minds — within the medical center and in the community — is vital to staying ahead of the curve. "Being generous with our expertise and nurturing talented entrepreneurs helps keep Cedars-Sinai at the cutting edge of innovation in healthcare," he said.


Christina Yip, a Cedars-Sinai data analyst, spoke for her team, which took first place in the competition.

Two Cedars-Sinai Employees Explore Startup World

Christina Yip, a data analyst in Nursing Research and Development, had to push herself to step up to the podium and talk about a healthcare business model she helped create during the three-day "Startup Weekend LA, Healthcare" event at Cedars-Sinai's Center for Clinical Innovation.

"I was nervous, but I thought this would be a really great opportunity to work on my public speaking skills," she said. "I'm really glad I spoke up."

"She did great," said Russ Dollinger, a Northridge entrepreneur who took an idea to the event that Yip and two other team members — Jordon Raeford and Emma Hanna, 12-year-olds from the Incubator School in West Los Angeles — helped develop during the three-day competition.

Michael Tran, a Performance Improvement facilitator at Cedars-Sinai, said the event motivated him to work on a business model for his idea.

Their concept for a business called MyNextGen Health won first place in the competition among seven teams. MyNextGen Health is a personalized patient education technology platform designed to overcome barriers to understanding pre- and post-operative instructions. Yip and her teammates will now have an opportunity to take their idea to the next level through a global video competition.

"I had the initial germ of the idea, but everyone contributed," Dollinger said. "The kids did some amazing things, including an online survey and the graphs for our presentation. And Christina was a very important part of the team. She worked hard on the nitty-gritty details. She was very focused."

Yip said this was her first startup experience. "I'm very interested in healthcare technology, and I wanted to understand the startup process from beginning to end," she said. "It was a great learning experience — and a lot of work. I definitely did not get my usual eight hours of sleep."

Michael Tran, a Performance Improvement facilitator at Cedars-Sinai, also played an important role as a team member in the competition.

Tran's team created a software platform called Reflect that empowers the elderly to live safely at home by making it possible for loved ones to track their daily activities from a distance. Tran said he contributed fall-detection advice to the platform that was inspired by concern for his own parents.

"I've always had ideas like this, but I'd talk myself out of pursuing them because I didn't have the technological know-how," he said. "This event put me in touch with people with different skill sets and motivated me to vet my idea and work on a business model. I learned a lot."

Cardiac Monitoring Policy Is Updated

In order to make beds with cardiac monitors available to more patients, Cedars-Sinai has adapted the 2004 American Heart Association cardiac monitoring guidelines for use as its policy concerning the utilization of cardiac monitoring of general medical-surgical adult inpatients.

Starting Nov. 7, when ordering cardiac monitoring for a patient, providers will select a diagnostic indication for cardiac monitoring. Based on this indication, cardiac monitoring will have an associated time limit, either 24 or 48 hours, or until the order is discontinued. Four hours prior to order expiration, physicians and bedside nurses will receive best practice alerts (BPAs) to evaluate the order for renewal.

Details about the change:

  • Providers will order cardiac monitoring by selecting the appropriate diagnostic indication for monitoring based on a table of indications.
  • Providers and nurses will receive a BPA four hours before the cardiac monitoring order expires.
  • Nurses can renew the cardiac monitoring order if the patient is clinically unstable or has a new or worsening arrhythmia. In addition, nurses will allow the cardiac monitoring orders to expire if the patient is clinically stable and free of any arrhythmias as per policy.
  • If a patient has discharge orders, or if a provider decides to let the cardiac monitoring order expire, neither providers nor nurses will continue to see the expiring order BPA.
  • Nurses will see a separate BPA if documentation shows that the patient is on cardiac monitoring without an active order. They will be prompted to contact a provider to obtain a cardiac monitoring order.

The cardiac monitoring change is one of several CS-Link™ updates that took effect Nov. 7. For more information and illustrations, see this document in CS-Link Central.

Two Minutes With …

This new question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the physicians in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery.

Daniel Shouhed, MD, faculty member

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in the "mean streets" of Beverly Hills, as Dr. Gewertz once stated. In fact, I was born at Cedars-Sinai in 1981. I attended Beverly Hills High School and after graduating in 1999, I attended UCLA, where I received a BS in physiology. Aside from spending six months in Spain and two months in Paris during college, I spent the rest of my life in Los Angeles up until the age of 22.

Would you share something that many people at the hospital wouldn't know about you?

I was a volunteer at Cedars-Sinai many years ago. I started in high school and continued into college. I remember spending at least one of those years volunteering on 8 South, where I now send most of my patients. I did not think that 20 years later I would be one of those physicians I used to shadow and look up to. The care the nurses and physicians delivered was so impressive; so much that it actually played a big role in my desire to pursue medicine and ultimately surgery. I've always felt a sense of community at Cedars-Sinai, and I have continued to experience it as a resident surgeon and faculty attending.

Is there something or someplace you have never seen that you would like to see in the near future?

There are many places I hope to visit in the near future. One of my passions in life is to travel and experience different cultures. Each country I have visited has offered something unique and special, whether it be one of the world's wonders, an authentic type of cuisine or a different perspective on life by a local citizen. I was lucky enough to spend the last year in New York City completing my fellowship training in metabolic, endocrine and minimally invasive surgery, and each time I would get on the subway, I would be surrounded by at least 10 people representing different countries and cultures. It really was an amazing experience. I am eager to visit Southeast Asia the next time I have an extended period of time off.

Outside the operating room, where do you find inspiration?

Outside of the O.R., I find inspiration in playing classical music. Playing the piano was a big part of my life growing up. It has been hard to find as much time to pursue this since graduating high school and leaving my parent's house, where there was a piano just sitting in the living room. I look forward to having a piano in my own living room one day and creating more time to once again purse one of my most inspiring passions.


Ryan G. Spurrier, MD, surgical resident

Why did you decide to specialize in surgery?

A summer job during college working as an emergency room technician redirected my studies from biomedical engineering to medicine. Once in medical school, the only specialty that sated my desire to do, build, fix and heal was surgery.

What is the most rewarding aspect about your job?

Identifying a problem and being able to fix it.

What is the funniest thing a patient has ever said to you?

That she would make an excellent mother-in-law.


Marissa Srour, MD, surgical resident

What brought you to Cedars-Sinai?

The strong academic, research, and surgical field brought me to Cedars-Sinai.

Where did you grow up?

I was born and raised in Los Angeles.

If you were not a physician, what other career would you choose?

I love to bake desserts, and I would open a bakery.

What did your parents always tell you that you now have to admit was correct?

Always bring a sweater when you go out.

If you could spend the day doing one thing, what would it be?

Spending time with my family and friends — the venue doesn't matter.

Surgeon Scorecard: How Patients Choose a Physician

By Timothy J. Daskivich, MD, MSHPM
Staff Physician, Urology Academic Practice
Urologic Oncologist, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Director, Health Services Research, Department of Surgery

The wide variation in the quality of healthcare provided by physicians in the United States has prompted a call for more transparent reporting of individual physician performance to help consumers identify high quality providers. The medical community at large has been slow to respond, ostensibly due to concerns about accuracy and fairness of comparisons but also due to uncertainty about impact on the profession.

As a result of this delay, consumer groups have developed online tools to satisfy the public's need for more information, and these tools are being used. In September 2012, a survey of 2,137 U.S. adults found that 65 percent were aware of physician ratings websites and that 59 percent reported these sites to be "somewhat important" or "very important" in choosing a physician.

ProPublica, a nonprofit corporation that calls itself a "newsroom that produces investigative journalism in the public interest," recently launched a provocative project to compare quality of individual surgeons using Medicare claims data called the Surgeon Scorecard. This tool provides a user-friendly interface to compare individual surgeons (and institutions) by surgical volume and complication rates — a composite measure of surgery-specific complications, 30-day readmissions and in-hospital mortality — across eight of the most common surgical procedures performed in the U.S.

In addition, it shows how individual surgeons compare to others locally and nationally, plotting them across a spectrum of low, medium and high rates of complications, which are risk-adjusted for age, sex, health status and condition-specific variables. To the healthcare consumer seeking a high-quality surgeon, this tool is a huge step forward, providing objective comparisons of performance where there was previously a vacuum of information.

Despite its merits, there are still many flaws in the Surgeon Scorecard: the difficulties of making robust comparisons of surgeons based on rare events, the questionable validity of using Medicare claims to identify these events, the inability to completely adjust for case mix. These are important concerns that need to be addressed, especially since unsuspecting consumers will assume that comparisons are fair and unbiased.

But aside from these details, there are even bigger questions: How do we prevent surgeons from "cherry-picking" easier cases to optimize outcomes? How do we prevent those who care for the sickest patients from being unduly penalized? How do young surgeons without a track record develop in this environment? If market forces concentrate care in the hands of a few highly skilled providers, will this ultimately result in reduced access to care?

However, for all of these growing pains, it would be a mistake for the surgical community to react defensively to the concept of transparency, since this is undoubtedly the future of how patients will select a surgeon in the era of big data. Instead, we need to fully embrace transparency and accountability, and we should focus on ways to improve our quality of care to prepare for this eventuality.

One way is to use Crimson data to understand your own strengths and weaknesses in terms of key quality outcomes. This powerful resource available to all surgeons at Cedars-Sinai summarizes your individual performance on numerous quality indicators and shows how you compare to your peers nationally and locally.

Another way to understand and improve the quality of care that you provide is to participate in a quality collaborative; these collaboratives collect data and provide feedback to their members about performance in areas of quality, cost and efficiency of care, and they work together to address areas of deficiency. As the director of Health Services Research for the Department of Surgery, I hope to form such a quality collaborative across the surgical subspecialties at Cedars-Sinai over the coming months. By working together on continual self-assessment and meaningful quality improvement, we can ready ourselves for the time, in the not-too-distant future, when all data is public.

Timothy J. Daskivich, MD, MSHPM, is a urologic oncologist in the Academic Urology Program and the director of Health Services Research for the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. His clinical practice includes surgical treatment of cancers of the prostate, kidney, bladder and testis, with a focus on prostate cancer. He balances his clinical practice with a passion for health services research, a topic that addresses cost, quality and efficiency of healthcare. His main research focus is on life expectancy and its role in treatment decision-making for men with early-stage prostate cancer. His work promotes a more personalized approach to care to reduce unnecessary overtreatment, while targeting treatment to those who need it. He has published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Cancer, Archives of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Urology. His nationally recognized work has received funding from the American Cancer Society and the American Urological Association.

Research to Improve Outcomes After Colorectal Surgery

By Karen Zaghiyan, MD, and Phillip Fleshner, MD
Division of Colorectal Surgery

Striving to improve the care we provide our patients, the Cedars-Sinai Division of Colorectal Surgery continues to focus on research investigating clinical outcomes after major colorectal surgery.

We recently completed a large prospective randomized trial evaluating the efficacy of preoperative vs. postoperative subcutaneous heparin for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in over 400 patients undergoing major colorectal surgery. The results of this study are being considered for presentation at the American Surgical Association annual meeting in 2016.

Our focus has now shifted to another randomized prospective study evaluating transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block after colorectal surgery. With multimodal enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathways becoming increasingly important in the care of our colorectal surgery patients, this study was designed to evaluate a key component of our ERAS pathway here at Cedars-Sinai: the TAP block.

While traditionally performed by our colleagues in the Department of Anesthesia using ultrasound guidance at the conclusion of the operation, laparoscopic-guided TAP block has been performed elsewhere with good results. As it is unclear which technique is superior, we embarked on this study with our Anesthesia colleagues to evaluate narcotic utilization and overall recovery in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided vs. laparoscopic-guided TAP block after major colorectal surgery. Recruitment is ongoing with a plan to enroll 250 patients.

Another important question in the field of colorectal surgery is timing of urinary catheter removal after pelvic surgery, i.e., low anterior resection, abdominoperineal resection and ileal pouch anal anastomosis. Traditional teaching is to delay removal of the urinary catheter for several days after pelvic dissection. The rationale for this practice is to prevent urinary retention related to bladder manipulation and trauma to the pelvic sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers during pelvic dissection.

However, prolonged urinary catheterization predisposes to urinary tract infections and may interfere with early ambulation, leading to DVT and longer hospital stay. In addition, driven in part by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reimbursement schema now penalizing hospitals for catheter-associated urinary tract infections and Surgical Care Improvement Project measures requiring removal of the urinary catheter on or before postoperative day 2 unless medically indicated, the standard practice of prolonged urinary catheterization is being challenged.

While alpha-1-adrenergic stimulation may play a role in early postoperative urinary retention, the utility of alpha-1-adrenergic blockade in preventing postoperative urinary retention is unclear. In an ongoing, noninferiority, randomized prospective study, we are evaluating the incidence of urinary retention with an alpha-1-adrenergic antagonist given six hours before urinary catheter removal on postoperative day one vs. urinary catheter removal on postoperative day three.

Quality surgical care is not only dependent on precise surgical technique, but also relies heavily on the perioperative care we provide. Through these studies, we challenge ourselves to a higher bar with respect to the day-to-day perioperative care of our patients.

OR 360 Wins Award from West Hollywood Chamber

Cedars-Sinai's OR 360 has won a Creative City Award from the West Hollywood Chamber of Commerce.

The project won the chamber's Creative Concept Award, given to an operation that is "an innovator of a cool new concept, product or service." The six Creative City Awards were presented on Nov. 4.

Cedars-Sinai partnered with the U.S. military to design OR 360, the "operating room of the future" that will enable emergency medical teams to respond more quickly and effectively to patients with life-threatening injuries.

Under the project, research teams reconfigured the operating room with movable walls and equipment for more flexible use, identified ways to eliminate disruptions during surgery, and developed a smartphone app that provides diagnostic information about blood pressure and other vital signs before patients arrive in the emergency room.

The chamber chose the award winners for their innovation in their approach to business or their creative merits in product and service.

Innovation Challenge Selects 10 Semifinalists

Twenty teams pitched their ideas to improve the patient experience at the Nov. 10 event.

As a part of the first MD/RN Patient Experience Innovation Challenge, more than 250 nurses and physicians came together last week to pitch collaborative solutions to improve the patient experience at Cedars-Sinai.

The challenge emerged from the MD/RN Collaborative, which brings together members of the clinical care team to enhance clinical quality, safety and experience. Through the challenge, teams from the MD/RN Collaborative were tasked with identifying solutions in technology, design, devices and process.

In the challenge's first event — inspired by the popular ABC television show Shark Tank — 20 teams were selected to pitch their ideas to a panel of six judges on Nov. 10.

After listening to an array of innovative ideas, the judges selected 10 semifinalist teams:

Among the physicians and nurses presenting solutions were Axel Rosengart, MD, PhD, (left) and Azure Chabot, BSN, RN.
  • Team REM Pros seeks to provide personalized patient care by encouraging patients to make three wishes on an electronic wrist "Wishband." By making these wishes, patients are encouraged to participate in their own care and to learn more about perioperative processes, treatment options and medications.
  • Team Moments of Genius created an incentive program that provides motivation, inspiration and confidence during the discharge process. Items given to patients throughout the process encourage engagement before being discharged.
  • Team Heart Throbs designed a one-touch communications-based app that allows patients to communicate with staff and family members through the touch of an iPad. The app is available in multiple languages, helping to resolve language barriers.
  • Team Uber-ful Care pitched a patient-centered mobile triage kiosk to help reduce wait times and direct patients to appropriate areas of care within 30 minutes. An additional concierge care application would provide car service options to patients. The innovation aims to improve experience, quality, value and efficiency.
  • Team CS Assist created a solution using a touch-enabled kiosk that helps families locate patients, as well as areas of interest on campus. An additional app allows patients to gain a sense of control and autonomy while in the hospital.
  • Team Interactive Book uses drawings and language to help communicate topics relevant to all aspects of patient care. The book is an instant resource for questions throughout the care process.
  • Team Ohm Patrol created the Tree of Life, an enhanced IV pole designed to personalize patient care by infusing medicine with imagination. This redesigned pole, in the shape of a tree, would provide additional patient education resources and would incorporate New Age technology with holistic care to create the "Art of Healing."
  • Team Heart Menders is a patient-friendly tablet application that assists patients with selecting meals based on dietary needs and cultural preferences. It is designed to enhance communication between the interdisciplinary team and patients.
  • Team Cedars Engage is an app to help streamline workflows while empowering patients and families to partner with their care team. This mobile-based platform aims to improve communication between patients, families and providers.
  • Team Body Shop supports quarterly "tune-ups" performed by the interdisciplinary team on inpatients in effort to decrease readmissions and medication-related adverse events.

The semifinalists will develop their prototypes for mock implementation during a pilot phase over the next several months. A challenge winner will be selected in June.

A panel of Cedars-Sinai executive judges considered the teams' solutions and picked 10 semifinalist teams.

Audience member Naomi Tashman, RN, took a cellphone photo of the action.

A large, enthusiastic audience watched the proceedings.

Circle of Friends Honorees for October

The Circle of Friends program honored 193 people in October.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Krystianne Nigel Abrenica, RN
  • Monique R. Acosta, RN
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Edward Aguilar
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, MN, RN, AOCN
  • Ellen Anifantis, LCSW
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • Lilia G. Ayap
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • Michel Babajanian, MD
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Babak R. Bamshad, MD
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • William W. Brien, MD
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Alexis Bronder, RN
  • Eileen G. Brown, OCN, RN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Allison H. Canavan, MD
  • Jeffrey F. Caren, MD
  • Brendan J. Carroll, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Rhona M. Castillo, RN
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • Martin Cooper, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Xiaojiang Cui, PhD
  • Joy Curry
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Shaun S. Daneshrad, MD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Tiffany Daun, BSN, RN
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Maria Wilma D. Davis
  • Alfredo De Los Santos, RN
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Michael T. Duffy, MD
  • Venus V. Escarza
  • Shervin Eshaghian, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • David E. Fermelia, MD
  • Morton H. Field, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Roslyn Fox
  • Kathleen M. Freund, RN
  • David M. Frisch, MD
  • Ramin Gabbai, MD
  • Dael Geft, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Alexander Gershman, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • David B. Golden, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Theodore B. Goldstein, MD
  • Mark O. Goodarzi, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Steven B. Graff-Radford, DDS
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Melinda A. Hakim, MD
  • Omid Hamid, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Timothy D. Henry, MD
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD
  • Jethro L. Hu, MD
  • Robin R. Hudson, RN, CPAN
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • Jessica Jung, RN
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD
  • Brenda L. Kearney, RN
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Dennis H. Kim, MD
  • Howard H. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Lucy Kim, LCSW, ACM
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Nidia L. Lanuza
  • Zsofia Laszlo, NP
  • Elda Lazaro, MSW, MPH, LCSW
  • Gary E. Leach, MD
  • Iskra I. Ledic, RN
  • Madeline S. Lerman, BSN, RN
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Meldon C. Levy, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Monica Lundry, RN
  • James F. MacDonald, BSN, RN, MPH
  • Hooman Madyoon, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Lorraine Malina
  • Irene R. Marker, MSN, RN, ACNP-BC
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Shahab Mehdizadeh, MD, MA
  • Puja K. Mehta, MD
  • Farhad Melamed, MD
  • Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS
  • Erin Meschter, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Margo Minissian, MSN, RN, NP, ACNP-BC, CLS-BC, CNS
  • Owel R. Miranda, RN
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Ashkan L. Naraghi, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Arshia M. Noori, MD
  • Kristine Norland, RN
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Shi-Hui Pan, PharmD
  • Alice Peng, MD
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Howard E. Pitchon, MD
  • Robert B. Pompa, MD
  • Shervin Rabizadeh, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • John F. Reinisch, MD
  • Gary Reznik, MD
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Carmelita Runyan, RN
  • Amy S. Rutman, MD
  • Deborah Saks-Morgan, RN
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Benjamin S. Santos, MD
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • David W. Scott, PhD
  • Payam Shadi, MD
  • Aamir S. Shah, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Dale S. Sherman, PhD
  • Jeffrey H. Sherman, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Amanuel Sima, MD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • R. Kendrick "Ken" Slate, MD
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Kenneth O. Sparks, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Conrad J. Tseng, MD
  • Gregory Tsushima, MD
  • Paidamwoyo S. Tswakanyi, RN
  • Francis Tucker, RN
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Lynette Ursini, RN
  • Lacey Valenza, RN
  • Noel G. Valmores, MSN, RN, CMSRN
  • Marina Vaysburd, MD
  • Angela Velleca, BSN, RN, CCTC
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Ronald G. Victor, MD
  • Willis Wagner, MD
  • Christine S. Walsh, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Marleen J. Williams, RN
  • Sophia D. Woods
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • John S. Yu, MD
  • Evan M. Zahn, MD
  • Phillip C. Zakowski, MD
  • Hong Zhou, NP