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PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY October 2015 | Archived Issues

FDA Requires Drug Interaction Studies for Kayexalate

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requiring the manufacturer of the hyperkalemia drug Kayexalate to conduct studies to investigate Kayexalate's potential to bind to other medications administered by mouth — drug interactions that could affect how well the other medications work.


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF links below to see the Department of Surgery's education schedule.

Education Schedule - October 2015 (PDF)

Education Schedule - November 2015 (PDF)  


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

Share Your News

Know an interesting colleague we should profile? A story we should tell? Submit your ideas, meetings and events for consideration.

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Clinical Trial Aims to Help Children With Incontinence

The majority of children with neurologic abnormalities of their spinal cord, such as spina bifida with myelomeningocele or traumatic spinal cord injuries, will face lifelong challenges with their bladder function. Treatment often entails intermittent self-catheterization and medications.

Despite this, many children will still suffer from chronic incontinence and require major bladder reconstructive surgeries. While successful, these surgeries are associated with significant long-term risks and complications.

Researchers have been looking for ways to better manage these children's bladders without the need for major reconstruction. One innovative approach for patients with an overactive neurogenic bladder is injections with Botox. This approach has been under investigation for many years and is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in adults. Its use in children remains investigational.

In order to study the safety, efficacy and dose response of Botox in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity, Allergan — the maker of Botox — has launched a large multinational, multicenter clinical trial. The Cedars-Sinai Division of Urology recently was approved as a study site for this project and has begun to enroll patients.

The study is being conducted by Andrew L. Freedman, MD, director of Pediatric Urology, and Jennifer T. Anger, MD, associate director of Urologic Research, both of whom are members of the Urology Residency faculty. This collaborative research is one of several projects bringing together adult and pediatric surgical specialists to provide innovative and leading-edge care to Cedars-Sinai's pediatric and adolescent patients with congenital disease.

By working together, we are building the infrastructure and medical teams that are prepared help patients with congenital surgical conditions navigate the difficult transition from pediatric to adult care.