sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY December 2016 | Archived Issues

Human Rights Activist to Speak at King Day Celebration

MLK Day Celebration

Human rights activist Nontombi Naomi Tutu will be the keynote speaker at the 15th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration on Monday, Jan. 16. All employees, physicians, visitors and patients are welcome to attend the event, which runs from noon to 1 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

» Read more

Key Changes Coming to Medicare Payment Model

As part of a federal effort to streamline regulations and improve healthcare value and quality, the Medicare payment model will undergo significant change beginning Jan. 1. Under the new rules, eligible clinicians must participate in one of two payment tracks. More than 85 percent of physicians will work with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System, while the remainder will use the Advanced Alternative Payment Model.

» Read more

Priselac Speaks About Healthcare Change to Civic Group

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, visited a major Los Angeles civic organization recently and offered a glimpse of how he sees the healthcare industry evolving. Priselac spoke about rapidly advancing medical care driven by research discoveries and digital innovations, many of which already are reshaping patient care and the healthcare landscape.

» Read more

New Scientists and Clinicians Join Cancer Institute

The Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute is bolstering its formidable roster of physicians and researchers with the addition of four highly regarded doctors who will expand clinical and investigational options for breast cancer and prostate cancer patients.

» Read more

Trauma Program Holds Advanced Courses

As a level 1 trauma hospital, the Department of Surgery's Trauma Program regularly holds courses in Advanced Trauma Life Support and Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses.

» Read more

Researchers Win Grant to Expand Cardiac Cell Study

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension. This work will be supported by a recently awarded $7.3 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

» Read more

Scientist Gives on Giving Tuesday in Honor of Mother's Care

Giving Tuesday Lluz callout

More than 1,300 employees gave back to Cedars-Sinai last month by sharing their stories of gratitude during the third annual Giving Tuesday experience. The stories provided hope to those facing health challenges, and inspired others to support Cedars-Sinai with meaningful gifts that fund research and lifesaving treatments.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 242 people in November. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Accessing the National Record Locator Services

cs-link logo

CS-Link™ allows access to Surescripts' National Record Locator Services, which provides a list of healthcare facilities a patient has been seen through Care Everywhere.

» Read more

Human Rights Activist to Speak at King Day Celebration

MLK Tutu Naomi

Nontombi Naomi Tutu

Human rights activist Nontombi Naomi Tutu will be the keynote speaker at the 15th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration on Monday, Jan. 16.

All employees, physicians, visitors and patients are welcome to attend the event, which runs from noon to 1 p.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium. A limited number of free boxed lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

A special musical performance by Chuck Wansley After Hours will conclude the program.

The third child of Archbishop Desmond and Nomalizo Tutu, Nontombi Naomi Tutu is a development consultant in West Africa and a coordinator for programs on race, gender and gender-based violence in education at the African Gender Institute at the University of Cape Town. The challenges of growing up black and female in apartheid South Africa helped shape Tutu’s life as an activist and as a champion of human dignity.

Tutu has also taught at the University of Hartford, University of Connecticut and Brevard College in North Carolina. The founder of Nozizwe Consulting, she brings different groups together to learn from each other and celebrate their shared humanity.

Chuck Wansley is a world-class singer, bandleader and musician. He blends elements of blues and soul music into his jazz repertoire that honors American jazz greats including Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Nat King Cole and Joe Williams.

Wansley attended the Berklee School of Music in Boston. He has worked with legendary artists including David Foster, Poncho Sanchez, Mary Wells, Richard Marx, Frankie Beverly & Maze and Phyllis Hyman. Chuck also teaches jazz vocals and stage performance at the Mezinarodni Conservatory in Prague, and conducts frequent jazz workshops and clinics in the United States, Japan and Europe.

Key Changes Coming to Medicare Payment Model

As part of a federal effort to streamline regulations and improve healthcare value and quality, the Medicare payment model will undergo significant change beginning Jan. 1.

Under the new rules, eligible clinicians must participate in one of two payment tracks. More than 85 percent of physicians will work with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), while the remainder will use the Advanced Alternative Payment Model.

Under MIPS, physicians will still be required to comply with many of the provisions of Meaningful Use, a 5-year-old federal program designed to enhance health outcomes and to encourage the adoption of electronic health records. The federal program's next phase is known as Advancing Care Information, which will score physicians on a revamped set of measures. Physicians who do not participate could face penalties.

For more information, see the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services website.

Priselac Speaks About Healthcare Change to Civic Group

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO

Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO, visited a major Los Angeles civic organization recently and offered a glimpse of how he sees the healthcare industry evolving. Priselac spoke about rapidly advancing medical care driven by research discoveries and digital innovations, many of which already are reshaping patient care and the healthcare landscape.

Reflecting on work going on at Cedars-Sinai, Priselac told the luncheon sponsored by Town Hall of Los Angeles that breakthroughs within nanotechnology, precision medicine and regenerative medicine offer unprecedented hope for improving standards of medical care and enhancing quality of life in the coming years.

"A real challenge for those leading and working in healthcare is prioritizing and managing the volume of change that is currently going on," Priselac said during his hourlong presentation on Nov. 29. "But there is no doubt it will make American healthcare more efficient and of a higher quality."

Priselac said that progress has been fueled by the rapid development in understanding the human genome. Significant advancements are leading to new treatments that can harvest stem cells to regrow damaged tissue in multiple organs, identify blood protein markers to flag potential medical problems, and develop tools to boost the body's immune system against cancer, he said.

These research developments coincide with the rise of digital and mobile technologies that already have produced the electronic medical record and patient-friendly mobile applications like CS-Link™. The collection, storage and relatively easy retrieval of medical data has been transformative for physicians and especially for patients.

"Patients can now use this information in a way that is meaningful to them," Priselac said. "We are moving to a more customer-centered care model. It's here today and it's here to stay."

Within the next several years, digital technologies will help dramatically improve the management of chronic diseases, which are becoming increasingly common, Priselac said. Remote monitoring will aid in better tracking of patients and even help to ensure that they take their medications. The data will lead to earlier interventions if problems are detected, averting unnecessary hospitalizations.

During a question-and-answer session, Priselac was asked about rising healthcare costs in the U.S. and how they compare to the situation in leading European countries. Each national system properly reflects its own culture and economy, said Priselac, who has closely studied healthcare policy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

Priselac noted one key difference: American expectations for healthcare.

"In places like Germany, broadly speaking, people don't expect to get a titanium hip so they can keep playing tennis when they are 95," Priselac said.

When asked about the recent national election and its impact on healthcare, Priselac acknowledged change is ahead, but perhaps not as dramatic as some speculate.

"What won't change is the need to make healthcare more uniformly high quality and to make it as affordable as it can possibly be," he said. "So how one administration may go about that may differ, but the goals will be the same."

New Scientists and Clinicians Join Cancer Institute

The Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute is bolstering its formidable roster of physicians and researchers with the addition of four highly regarded doctors who will expand clinical and investigational options for breast cancer and prostate cancer patients.

The doctors are trailblazers in their fields, focusing on first-of-its-kind immunotherapy for breast cancer; innovations in breast-cancer radiation; genomic sequencing for personalized cancer treatment; and cancer prevention, treatment and survival, particularly among minority populations.

The newcomers also provide additional options for patients who feel more comfortable being treated by women physicians. Three of them assumed their posts in November; the fourth begins in early January.

"We're delighted to welcome these talented scientists and superb clinicians, who will have a positive impact on our patients and on the scholarly culture of the cancer institute," said Steven Piantadosi, MD, PhD, director of the institute.

The doctors are:

Heather McArthur, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Breast Oncology
Staff Physician in the Division of Hematology Oncology and the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Acting Associate Professor of Medicine

McArthur, who joins Cedars-Sinai from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, is a medical oncologist with a clinical breast cancer practice. Her research focuses on innovations in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, with a special interest in novel immune therapy strategies.

She's working on a treatment that combines cryoablation — freezing of a tumor — with immune therapy drugs that are effective in treating advanced melanoma, an aggressive skin cancer. She has been a reviewer for numerous clinical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer. She has written more than 65 articles, invited commentaries and book chapters on breast cancer.

"Breast cancer patients, who feel so vulnerable, need a special relationship with their oncologist," McArthur said. "My relationships with patients are very deep and very special. I treat them like family members."

McArthur said that she and frequent collaborator Alice Y. Ho, MD, MBA, also from Memorial Sloan Kettering, are committed to furthering the research goals in breast cancer at Cedars-Sinai.

"We are excited to build a multidisciplinary breast cancer program that's clinically oriented and connects to unique clinical trials," McArthur said.


Alice Y. Ho, MD, MBA
Staff Physician
Director of Breast Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology and Division of Hematology Oncology and the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Acting Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Medicine

Ho is a radiation oncologist with a clinical practice dedicated solely to the care of breast cancer patients. Her research is focused on radiation techniques that minimize adverse side effects from radiation and improve the quality of life in breast cancer patients who undergo reconstructive surgery. She also is developing novel radiation-and-drug treatments for women with triple-negative breast cancer and clinical trials for women with positive lymph nodes who undergo mastectomy. She has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles, reviews, commentaries, book chapters and books on breast cancer.

"We're pioneering studies in breast cancer at Cedars-Sinai. We want to use combinations of cryoablation, chemotherapy, immune therapy and radiation to see if the results are better than using any single agent alone," Ho said. "Women will be able to take advantage of helpful programs, depending on their type of breast cancer."


Reva Basho, MD
Staff Physician, Division of Hematology Oncology

Basho's interests include the development of new therapies for high-risk breast cancer that is resistant to standard therapy, particularly triple-negative breast cancer. In recent years, significant progress has been made to subdivide breast cancer into groups that may respond to certain classes of drugs. Basho, a clinical researcher who comes from the University of Texas MD Anderson Center, says she hopes to employ this knowledge to design clinical trials that test novel targeted therapies in various types of patients. She has served as first author on studies in top journals and received a 2016 Young Investigator Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

"As I continue to develop my career as a breast cancer researcher at Cedars-Sinai, I hope to bring relevant and high-impact clinical trials to patients," Basho said. "Together, we can continue to overcome the obstacles that we face in fighting breast cancer today and in the future."


Jane Figueiredo, PhD
Director, Community and Population Health Research, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Research Scientist, Division of Hematology Oncology
Acting Associate Professor of Medicine

Figueiredo's research seeks to understand how environmental and genetic factors affect the development, treatment and prevention of disease, especially among minority populations. Her studies examine risk factors and long-term outcomes for colorectal, prostate and breast cancer patients. Figueiredo, who comes from the Keck School of Medicine of USC, is looking for new biomarkers from blood, urine and stool samples to predict treatment response and likely outcomes. She also is looking at how patients' health practices influence the effectiveness and safety of treatments.

"My goal at Cedars-Sinai is to advance interdisciplinary cancer research using approaches based on samples from appropriate populations, and develop a comprehensive research program in colorectal cancer," Figueiredo said.

Trauma Program Holds Advanced Courses

As a level 1 trauma hospital, the Department of Surgery's Trauma Program regularly holds courses in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) and Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses (ATCN).

These successful courses, which were most recently conducted in mid-November, provide professional education and outreach. They are held concurrently to help teach coordinated trauma care to the multidisciplinary team of clinicians.

In addition to Cedars-Sinai and surrounding parts of Los Angeles County, students came from Hawaii, Korea and Australia. The multidisciplinary course helps support Cedars-Sinai's Magnet designation by demonstrating a commitment to nursing education and professional development, and by fostering collaborative working relationships with other disciplines.

The program is scheduled to host its next series of ATLS/ATCN courses in July 2017.

For additional information, please contact Heidi Hotz at heidi.hotz@cshs.org or Brett Dodd at brett.dodd@cshs.org.

Researchers Win Grant to Expand Cardiac Cell Study

Researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the Department of Medicine are expanding their ongoing evaluation of a novel cell-based therapeutic candidate into the area of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This work will be supported by a recently awarded $7.3 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a chronic disease that is very different from, and much more dangerous than, regular hypertension. Caused by high blood pressure in the large arteries leading from the heart to the lungs, the condition affects 200,000 patients in the U.S. every year and can lead to heart failure and premature death. Symptoms include shortness of breath, dizziness and chest pain.

The new clinical study will test the safety and effectiveness of treating PAH with cells known as cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). CDCs consist of a single type of cardiac progenitor cell, and they are being studied in clinical trials at Cedars-Sinai for other types of heart disease and for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The CDCs to be used in the upcoming study are manufactured by Capricor Therapeutics Inc., which is developing this technology as its therapeutic product candidate CAP-1002.

"We have an exciting opportunity to try something new in these patients who currently have limited treatment options," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and the researcher who invented and developed the CDC technology. "Our theory is that introducing these cells into the arteries leading to the lungs will reduce inflammation and, as a result, prevent permanent damage to the heart by decreasing pulmonary blood pressure."

The clinical study in PAH will be led by Michael I. Lewis, MD, director of Respiratory Therapy, and could begin enrolling patients as early as mid-2017.

In 2009, a team led by Marbán completed the world's first clinical trial of CDCs. The results, which were published in The Lancet in 2012, showed a medical first: evidence that healthy heart muscle could be therapeutically regenerated in a heart damaged by a heart attack. Since then, Marbán's research has led to several clinical trials in which heart disease patients undergo a catheter-based procedure during which they receive an infusion of millions of CDCs.

"The primary goal of our study in pulmonary arterial hypertension is to verify safety," Lewis said. "However, we did see significant improvement in laboratory animal tests that we hope will lead us to innovative and effective treatments for a group of patients who currently face an uphill battle."

"This award is a reflection of the continued excellence of our heart institute in leading the field and maintaining Cedars-Sinai as a pioneer in successfully and safely bringing cellular therapies to treat our patients with serious cardiovascular disorders," said Shlomo Melmed, MD, Cedars-Sinai executive vice president for Academic Affairs, dean of the medical faculty and the Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Distinguished Chair in Investigative Medicine.

It is the second time in 2016 that Marbán's research resulted in a major grant to fund a clinical trial for patients with an incurable condition. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense awarded Cedars-Sinai a $10 million grant to fund a cell therapy trial for patients diagnosed with a common but difficult-to-treat form of heart failure called heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

Marbán developed the process to grow CDCs when he was on the faculty of Johns Hopkins University; the process was further developed at Cedars-Sinai. Capricor has licensed the process from Johns Hopkins and from Cedars-Sinai for clinical and commercial development. Capricor has licensed additional intellectual property from Cedars-Sinai and the University of Rome. Cedars-Sinai and Marbán have financial interests in Capricor.

Scientist Gives on Giving Tuesday in Honor of Mother's Care

Jerome Lluz, a clinical laboratory scientist III, frequently donates plasma and platelets as a way to honor his mother and to help others.

Gwendolyn Weissberg, an administrative services associate, (left) and Stephanie Urias, a clinical care associate, show what they are grateful for at the third annual Giving Tuesday experience.

More than 1,300 employees gave back to Cedars-Sinai last month by sharing their stories of gratitude during the third annual Giving Tuesday experience.

The stories provided hope to those facing health challenges, and inspired others to support Cedars-Sinai with meaningful gifts that fund research and lifesaving treatments.

One of the stories came from Jerome Godfrey Lluz. After his mother lost her battle with cancer five years ago, Jerome started donating plasma and platelets. He last donated in mid-November, his 34th donation.

"This is my way of giving back and helping other patients, especially ICU patients, just like my mom when she needed help from strangers," said Lluz, a clinical laboratory scientist III in the Transplant Immunology Laboratory.

Giving Tuesday is part of an effort to bring awareness to employees about the Campaign for Cedars-Sinai, a $600 million fundraising effort made possible by the generosity of grateful patient donors, employees and others.

Employees can continue to join the Giving Tuesday conversation online throughout the year on Twitter and Instagram at the hashtag #CedarsGratitude. Additional information also can be obtained by emailing giving@cshs.org or calling 323-866-7785.

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 242 people in November.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Rachel Abuav, MD
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel A. Anand, MD
  • John B. Andrews, MD
  • Jennifer T. Anger, MD, MPH
  • Alagappan Annamalai, MD
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • David Austin, MD
  • Irina Avidon, PharmD
  • Hyun W. Bae, MD
  • Mamadu Juma Bah
  • Benjamin Basseri, MD
  • Brian M. Benway, MD
  • George Berci, MD
  • Page A. Bertolotti, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Anton J. Bilchik, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Wendy Briggs
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Michelle K. Chang, PA
  • Piyaporn Chantravat, RN
  • Timothy Charlton, MD
  • George Chaux, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Sumeet S. Chugh, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • Donald S. Cohen, MD
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Martin Cooper, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Lawrence S. Czer, MD
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Robert M. Davidson, MD
  • Teresa M. Dean, MD
  • Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD
  • Ann S. Demaio, NNP
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Josefina B. Dy
  • Jonathan C. Ellis, MD
  • Alan Engelberg, MD
  • Anasheh Enjily
  • Shervin Eshaghian, MD
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Joel D. Feinstein, MD
  • Joy S. Feld, MD
  • Edward J. Feldman, MD
  • Stuart G. Finder, PhD
  • Dorothy Forneris, RN
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Joyce N. Fox, MD
  • Andrew L. Freedman, MD
  • Philip K. Frykman, MD, PhD
  • Clark B. Fuller, MD
  • Srinivas Gaddam, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Irene Luna Garcia
  • Dael Geft, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Sara Ghandehari, MD
  • Ann P. Gilligan, RN
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Jamie L. Golden, RN
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Lloyd B. Greig, MD
  • Marshall L. Grode, MD
  • Kapil Gupta, MD
  • Kathryn A. Gurvitz, MHA
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • David S. Hallegua, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Donald R. Henderson, MD, MPH
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Corina Hernandez, NP
  • Allen S. Ho, MD
  • Ivan Ho, MD
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Lalima A. Hoq, MD, MPH
  • Anabel M. Hugh, MD
  • Gabriel E. Hunt Jr., MD
  • Andrew F. Ippoliti, MD
  • Marney Jakubowicz, LVN
  • Laith H. Jamil, MD
  • Bronwen M. Jones
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Leah N. Justus, RN
  • Sheila Kahwaty PA-C, MPAS
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Adam D. Karns, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Elizabeth M. Kim, MD
  • Howard H. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Miyun Kim, RN
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Charles F. Kivowitz, MD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Keith L. Klein, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Ryan H. Kotton, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Stuart H. Kuschner, MD
  • Barbara R. Leanse, BSW
  • Paul C. Lee, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael S. Levine, MD
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Yuliya Linhares, MD
  • Milton Little, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Mark Logan, RN
  • Victoria C. Lopez, RN
  • Jonathan I. Macy, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Eve Louise Makoff, MD
  • Harumi O. Mankarios, RN, OCN
  • Malcolm L. Margolin, MD
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • David N. Matsumura, MD
  • Julia McCaffrey
  • Alain Mita, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Liana Moskal, RN
  • Zuri Murrell, MD
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Shawn S. Nasseri, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Arthur J. Ochoa, JD
  • Alexandra O'Connor
  • Katayoun Omrani, DDS
  • Dayanara Ortega
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Michelle Otani, RN
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Pamela J. Phillips, MD
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD
  • Jon Rasak, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Ali Rezaie, MD
  • Gary Reznik, MD
  • Bobbie J. Rimel, MD
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Stacey P. Rosenbaum, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Howard L. Rosner, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Ruth "Virginia" Russell, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Rola Saouaf, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Aamir S. Shah, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Randolph Sherman, MD
  • Nancy L. Sicotte, MD
  • Khawar M. Siddique, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Americo Simonini, MD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • R. Kendrick "Ken" Slate, MD
  • Sharon Sloan
  • Kenneth O. Sparks, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Gayane Stepanyan, RN
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Mabel A. Stringfellow
  • Carey B. Strom, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD
  • Christina M. Sutay, RN
  • Steven Sykes, MD
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Gershom Tam, RN
  • Victor F. Tapson, MD
  • Sandra E. Thomasian, MD
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Hitoshi "Tommy" Tomizawa, MD, MPH
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Suketu B. Vaishnav, MD
  • Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Angela Velleca, BSN, RN, CCTC
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Ronald G. Victor, MD
  • Carl Violano, MD
  • Olga Voroshilovsky, MD
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD
  • Willis Wagner, MD
  • Alan Waxman, MD
  • Alan Weinberger, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Michael H. Weisman, MD
  • Janet Y. White, MD
  • Donald A. Wiss, MD
  • Robert N. Wolfe, MD
  • Edward M. Wolin, MD
  • Veronica T. Wootton
  • Arthur Wu, MD
  • Philip A. Yalowitz, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • John S. Yu, MD
  • Zachary Zumsteg, MD

CS-Link Tip: Accessing the National Record Locator Services

CS-Link™ allows access to Surescripts' National Record Locator Services (NRLS), which provides a list of healthcare facilities a patient has been seen through the Care Everywhere framework.

The NRLS is automatically contacted when the patient has an upcoming appointment, comes through the Emergency Department, or when admitted. You can view a location summary through the documents tab.

Also, Care Everywhere automatically asks for records from organizations within 50 miles of the patient's home and work ZIP code. In addition, records from Veterans Affairs hospitals can also be reached through Care Everywhere.