sutures newsletter

PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY March 2016 | Archived Issues

P & T Approvals; FDA Warns About Zydelig

Pharmacy Focus

See highlights of the February meeting of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting healthcare professionals about reports of an increased rate of adverse events, including deaths, in clinical trials with the cancer medicine Zydelig in combination with other cancer medicines.

» Read more


Mark Your Calendar


Surgery Grand Rounds

Click the "read more" to see information about upcoming Surgery Grand Rounds.

» Read more


Grand Rounds

Click here to view a schedule of all upcoming grand rounds.


Education Schedule

Click the PDF link below to see the Department of Surgery's education schedule.

Education Schedule - March 2016  


Surgery Scheduling

Click the "read more" for hours and contact information for surgery scheduling.

» Read more

Expediting Admission to the SICU

By Eric Ley, MD
Director, Surgical Intensive Care Unit

A surgical safety checklist should be considered a tool to facilitate communication and coordination rather than a decree. Successful human factor interventions, such as a surgical safety checklist, require the system to adapt to the user rather than forcing the user to adapt to the system.

» Read more

Obesity and Prostate Cancer - Bedside to Bench and Back

New faculty recruits have joined the lab of Stephen Freedland, MD. Freedland's group specializes in prostate cancer prevention, management and outcomes. See the details of his team's research.

» Read more

Bhamb Wins Orthopaedic Association Award

The California Orthopaedic Association presented a series of four awards for resident research projects this year, with the Orthopaedic Resident and Education Foundation Resident Research Symposium award going to Neil Bhamb, MD, a PGY-4 Cedars-Sinai resident physician in Orthopaedic Surgery.

» Read more

Two Minutes With …

Two Minutes With

This question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the physicians in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. This month's installment features and Daisy Chou, MD, and Timothy Daskivich, MD, MSHPM.


» Read more

Does Surgery Work? Study Sniffs Out an Answer

Surgeons, of course, hope their handiwork helps patients. But how can they be sure? That question inspired Cedars-Sinai to launch an innovative study to quantify the outcomes of surgery for sinus inflammation. The data was reassuring. "We can now say that if you have endoscopic sinus surgery at Cedars-Sinai, you have an 87 percent chance of feeling better a year later," said Martin Hopp, MD, PhD.

» Read more

Gordon Discusses Cedars-Sinai Mural at Jewish Center

Leo Gordon, MD, medical adviser to the Cedars-Sinai Historical Conservancy, presented From Concept to Canvas — The Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Mural — Jewish Contributions to Medicine to the adult education section of the Merage Jewish Community Center in Irvine on Feb. 21.

» Read more

CS-Link Central Has New Design, Easier Navigation

cs-link logo

Take a few moments to check out the newly designed CS-Link Central — your source for CS-Link information and resources. The website now offers a fresh look and feel, easier-to-use layout and navigation, better search capabilities and mobile-friendly functionality.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Reminder Email

You should check your CS-Link InBasket daily. There may be times when you wish you could get a notification to your regular email that you have a message waiting for you in CS-Link. You can. Just set up an email reminder about InBasket notifications.

» Read more

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Morgenstern

The 13th annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will convene on Friday, June 3. The debate committee is soliciting topics.



» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 197 people in February. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Expediting Admission to the SICU

By Eric Ley, MD
Director, Surgical Intensive Care Unit

Atul Gawande, MD, demonstrated in a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that a surgical safety checklist can reduce mortality. In contrast, David Urbach, MD, also published his team's findings in the New England Journal of Medicine, establishing that implementation of a surgical safety checklist did not reduce mortality.

The consensus between the checklist-loving Gawande and the contrarian Urbach is that healthcare systems are complicated and successful implementation of a surgical safety checklist is not simple. A checklist should be considered a tool to facilitate communication and coordination rather than a decree that is posted on a computer monitor. Successful human factor interventions, such as a surgical safety checklist, require the system to adapt to the user rather than forcing the user to adapt to the system.

At Cedars-Sinai, we conducted a comprehensive human factors study of trauma patient flow from the prehospital setting through the Emergency Department, Radiology, operating room and intensive care unit. Our goal was to improve efficiency, as delays in trauma patient care can be catastrophic. Trained observers followed trauma patients through each phase of care and recorded "flow disruptions" in patient care.

Challenges were largely seen in communication, coordination and handoffs. A number of thoughtful interventions were proposed and tested to help the system adapt to the users in order to reduce flow disruptions. The result of the study was improved efficiency and lower length of stay for our high-level traumas.

One related intervention was the availability of a 24-hour ICU trauma bed, and with its implementation we observed a drop in mean ED length of stay from 4.2 hours to 3.1 hours for trauma patients who required an ICU bed. As noted, systems are complicated and an intervention such as establishing an available ICU bed does not necessarily translate to rapid patient transport to that bed.

During the human factors observation period, three steps that required increased communication and coordination were noted to slow the patient's transfer to the ICU bed:

  1. An admission order needs to be placed for the ICU bed.
  2. The trauma MD needs to phone the ICU MD for a simple handoff of the patient.
  3. The ED RN needs to phone the ICU RN handoff for a transition of care handoff.

Our study indicated that typically, the admission order was delayed until the MD was certain that the ICU bed was required. So we encouraged the order to be placed in the electronic medical record as soon as a patient was identified as potentially critically ill to initiate preparation for patient arrival. Sometimes the order was placed as soon as the patient rolled into the hospital. If necessary, this order could be reversed with no patient harm and little cost.

For step 2, the trauma MD to ICU MD handoff occurred when the diagnoses were available that supported the need for an ICU admission. For example, when a patient was intubated in the ED, significant injuries were noted on CT or a patient had a major operation, the MD-to-MD handoff occurred. And the last the step, ED RN handoff to ICU RN, occurred after the first two were completed. This step required the MD to update the RN that it was time to call for handoff, as frequently the RN was not aware that step 1 and step 2 were completed.

With this better understanding of patient flow to the SICU, mean ED length of stay reduced further, from 3.1 hours down to 2.4 hours. So should we post a checklist that pops up on your nearest CS-Link monitor titled How to Get Your Crashing Patient to the SICU?

Whether you are a Gawande believer or an Urbach supporter, if a patient is crashing in the ED, on the floor or in the operating room, remember to:

  1. Request the SICU bed as soon as possible.
  2. Call the MD in the ICU to hand off the patient.
  3. Encourage the nursing staff to do the same.

And if there is a problem, please drop me an email so we can determine where the flow disruptions were and how the system can better expedite the SICU admission.

Obesity and Prostate Cancer - Bedside to Bench and Back

New faculty recruits have joined the lab of Stephen Freedland, MD. Freedland's group specializes in prostate cancer prevention, management and outcomes. Freedland is a surgeon scientist, with a basic science laboratory funded by the National Institutes of Health, who created a research group that studies prostate cancer from the bedside to the laboratory and back again.

With expertise in epidemiology (Adriana Vidal, PhD), preclinical models (Everardo Macias, PhD) and clinical trials (Freedland), the team works to translate important work to the patients as quickly as possible.

Freedland was recruited to the Division of Urology in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery from Duke University in January 2015. Vidal and Macias joined him at Cedars-Sinai shortly after. His team brings added expertise in prostate cancer — already a great strength at Cedars-Sinai.

In addition, Freedland is the founding director of the Center for Integrated Research on Cancer and Lifestyle (CIRCL). The aim of the CIRCL is to further the understanding of how lifestyle factors (diet, exercise, smoking, drinking) impact cancer risk and progression. Using the same "bedside to bench and back again" philosophy, the CIRCL has already opened its first clinical trial for men with recurrent prostate cancer with a second trial opening soon for men with metastatic disease.

It is anticipated that these will be the first of many investigator-initiated studies using a lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing the morbidity and mortality of people with cancer. An overview of Freedland's team research is detailed below.

Inflammation, Prostate Cancer Have Complex Relationship

By Adriana Vidal, PhD, Everardo Macias, PhD, and Stephen Freedland, MD

We have previously shown in multiple publications that obese men are more likely to have aggressive prostate cancer, including progression after surgery. One of the mechanisms through which obesity may increase prostate cancer risk is inflammation. Indeed, it has been postulated that inflammation promotes prostate cancer development.

We and others found aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., ibuprofen) were linked with lower prostate cancer risk. However, the link between inflammation and prostate cancer is more complex. We previously studied prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in healthy men (a potential sign of prostate cancer), and found that while some inflammatory markers were linked with higher PSA levels, others were linked with lower PSA levels, suggesting certain inflammatory markers may be linked with lower prostate cancer risk.

Consistent with this, we studied men who all had prostate biopsies showing no cancer enrolled in a trial for a drug to prevent prostate cancer. The presence of acute and chronic inflammation in the biopsy slides was linked with a 35-40 percent lower risk of prostate cancer on a study-mandated biopsy two years later. The challenge is that while many studies look at inflammation, few dig deep and study the cell types that make up inflammation and when they do, results are interesting.

For example, macrophages — a type of white blood cell — can be divided into M1 and M2. A study found M1 macrophages were more common in early stage prostate cancer, while M2 was more common in advanced disease, suggesting inflammation may promote or prevent prostate cancer, depending on the cell type analyzed. Thus, we are now performing the first in-depth analysis of tissue inflammatory markers, which will allow us to characterize the specific inflammatory cell types present in the prostates of men with and without prostate cancer.

Particularly, we will investigate whether race modifies the associations between inflammatory markers and prostate cancer risk, given that inflammation varies by race and black men have a 67 percent higher prostate cancer risk than white men and over twice the mortality. Beyond the clinical aspects, identifying racial disparities in these tissue markers and importantly which aspects of race drive these differences (socioeconomics, lifestyle, genetics or other factor of "race") provides key mechanistic insights into prostate cancer racial disparity and identifies targets for future studies to modulate these factors to rebalance the inflammatory response to favor anti-prostate cancer inflammation, thus reducing the excess burden of prostate cancer among black men.

Preclinical animal studies from our group and others consistently show that obesity enhances prostate cancer growth. This creates an opportunity for us to exploit the link between obesity and prostate cancer growth to identify and target drivers of aggressive disease. In contrast, dietary interventions, either global calorie restriction or macronutrient deprivation (i.e., carbohydrate or cholesterol restriction) consistently slows tumor growth in mice. However, calorie restriction and macronutrient deprivation only leads to a modest tumor response.

This suggests that there must be either intrinsic or acquired resistance mechanisms that allow tumor cells to continue to survive or even proliferate. One of our objectives is to identify proteins that can be targeted by small molecule inhibitors to decrease obesity associated prostate cancer risks and others that will enhance the anti-tumoral efficacy of dietary interventions. To this end, we are using a genomic screen in mice to identify molecular targets that:

  • Drive prostate cell growth in obese hosts
  • Are essential for survival of prostate cancer cells under calorie restricted conditions

In preliminary studies, our screening has already identified several proteins known to be involved in obesity driven prostate cancer and those that impart resistance to calorie restriction, including Insulin Receptor, IGF-1R, Akt and mTOR, supporting the idea that our genomic screen works. We are currently investigating the therapeutic potential of other candidates from our genomic screen that have not been widely investigated nor targeted in prostate cancer.

Beyond observational studies and animal work, our group is heavily engaged in clinical trials. As noted, prior work from our group has shown that obesity is correlated with more aggressive prostate cancer and a low-carbohydrate diet in mice slows prostate cancer growth. Whether similar effects occur in humans is unknown.

To prepare to answer this question, we first completed a small study testing whether we could get men to adhere to our diet. We randomized men initiating hormonal therapy for prostate cancer to a six-month low-carbohydrate dietary intervention or no intervention. We found that men who were randomized to the low-carbohydrate diet lost 23 pounds.

Thus, given that men would adhere and stick to the diet, the next question we aim to answer is whether such a degree of weight loss will slow cancer growth. To test this, we are randomizing 60 men with recurrent prostate cancer to a low-carbohydrate diet or no diet control and assessing the rate of rise of serum PSA levels. Slower rates of PSA rise are correlated with slowed prostate cancer growth. Thus, we will for the first time test whether a low-carbohydrate diet can slow prostate cancer growth in humans. It is hoped trials such as this will help identify the optimal lifestyle for our cancer patients.

It is this bedside-to bench and back-again approach that drives our research. Together with old collaborators and new ones here at Cedars-Sinai, we aim to ultimately make a difference in how we manage patients.

Bhamb Wins Orthopaedic Association Award

The California Orthopaedic Association presented a series of four awards for resident research projects this year, with the Orthopaedic Resident and Education Foundation Resident Research Symposium award going to Neil Bhamb, MD, a PGY-4 Cedars-Sinai resident physician in Orthopaedic Surgery.

Bhamb will travel to this year's association meeting to present his research on the "Effect of Modulating Dietary Vitamin D on the General Bone Health of Rats During Posterolateral Spinal Fusion."

Along with his co-authors Melodie Metzger, PhD, and Linda Kanim, MA, Bhamb studied the effect of varying the dietary intake of vitamin D. This project built from research previously published by Metzger et al. The study showed that additional vitamin D in the diet of rats that underwent surgery improved markers of general bone health after surgery. This study helps researchers to better understand the effects of vitamin D separately from that of calcium, which are often administered together in clinical trials.

By studying the femurs of rats after surgery, Bhamb was able to show that their bone was biomechanically stronger and thicker. Given that over 40 million U.S. adults either have or are at risk for osteoporosis, methods that improve general bone health are of critical importance to physicians today.

While animal model research does not definitively answer these questions, it is an important stepping stone towards better understanding the use of vitamin D in humans.

Two Minutes With …

This question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the physicians in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery.

Two Minutes With Chou Daisy 140pxDaisy Chou, MD, Department of Surgery resident

Why did you decide to specialize in surgery?

I loved everything about my third-year surgery rotation: the attendings, the surgery residents, being in the O.R., taking care of surgical patients. When I was on my nonsurgery rotations, I would find myself being envious of my classmates who were on surgery and wishing that I could trade places with them.

What is the most rewarding aspect about your job?

The most rewarding aspect of our job is that we see the results of our efforts, sometimes immediately. For example, a patient in pain in the ER due to appendicitis or cholecystitis can walk out of the hospital the next day feeling 100 percent better after our surgical intervention.

What is the funniest thing a patient has ever said to you?

"You look like a doll."

What did your parent(s) always tell you that you now have to admit was correct?

My parents always told me I should listen to them because I can learn from their life experiences — they were right.


Two Minutes With Daskivich TimothyTimothy Daskivich, MD, MSHPM, staff physician, Urology Academic Practice

Where did you grow up?

I spent my childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. My parents and extended family live there. Although I’ve now been living outside of the Burgh for almost 20 years, I still consider myself a card-carrying Pittsburgher since it ruins my day when the Steelers lose.

Why did you decide to specialize in urology?

It’s a field that has incredible variety in terms of types of patients and operative approaches, and has a great balance of medical and surgical management. It is also very gratifying to take care of patients who have new diagnoses of cancer, since we can offer curative therapies for most of the cancers we deal with.

If you had time to develop a new skill, what would it be?

I would love to be able to write music. I can play the saxophone and was president of the chorus at my college, but I never took any courses in music theory and composition. I’m a huge fan of all kinds of music and listen to everything from Mos Def to Mozart, and I would love to be able to create my own.

How do you unwind at the end of the day?

I play with my 2-year-old and 4-year-old daughters, Genevieve and Coco. Sometimes it is more winding up than winding down, but there’s nothing else I’d rather be doing.

Is there something or someplace you have never seen that you would like to see in the near future?

I have never been to Sequoia National Park. I am currently weighing the pluses and minuses of an eight-hour round trip drive there with my 2- and 4-year old. I suspect it will still be there when they are 10 and 12.

Does Surgery Work? Study Sniffs Out an Answer

Surgeons, of course, hope their handiwork helps patients. But how can they be sure? That question inspired Cedars-Sinai to launch an innovative study that used patient surveys to quantify the outcomes of surgery for sinus inflammation, or rhinosinusitis. The data was reassuring.

"We can now say that if you have endoscopic sinus surgery at Cedars-Sinai, you have an 87 percent chance of feeling better a year later," said Martin Hopp, MD, PhD, director of Otolaryngology and medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Sinus Center.

Rhinosinusitis involves an inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose and nearby sinuses that can become chronic. Symptoms may include headaches, nasal stuffiness, pressure-like pain and fatigue. Physicians at the Sinus Center were among the first to adopt endoscopic techniques, which are less invasive than traditional open surgery, to treat this condition.

The research project involved 18 physicians and the nearly 600 patients they treated at the Sinus Center from 2010 to 2015. In surveys taken before their surgery and at several intervals for a year afterward, patients ranked 22 sino-nasal symptoms by severity, physical problems, functional limitations and emotional consequences. At year's end, 87 percent of patients reported reduced symptoms, with 2 percent about the same and the remainder reporting worsening symptoms.

The Cedars-Sinai Sinus Center of Excellence Quality Assurance and the Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) collaborated on the study, which was accepted for presentation at the prestigious 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development, March 17-19 in San Diego. The congress brings together practitioners and researchers to focus on improving the continuing medical education and professional development of health professionals.

An important goal of Cedars-Sinai's quality-assurance project was to educate the participating physicians about rhinosinusitis and relevant surgical techniques. A total of 40 hours of CME training was offered over five years. The physicians also reviewed the patient survey results at these sessions. The study found that half the physicians attended at least 14 hours of the training.

"The data suggests the value of combining long-term, focused education with an internal quality improvement initiative," the researchers concluded. In future studies, Hopp said the team hopes to learn whether the surgical outcomes will vary from year to year or according to the season of the year in which the operation was performed.

The Cedars-Sinai Sinus Center offers two types of endoscopic nasal surgery. Image-guided surgery involves inserting a magnifying endoscope tube, with a light and camera at the end, into the nose. This instrument guides the surgeon in clearing away polyps or other obstructions or removing small bones to enlarge the opening to the sinus. In balloon sinuplasty, the surgeon inserts a guide-wire catheter equipped with a tiny balloon through the nostril. Once it arrives in the blocked sinus passageway, the balloon is inflated to widen the sinus passageway.

Endoscopic surgery can reduce scarring, recovery time and pain for patients as compared with open surgery.

The IRB number for human subjects in research referenced in this article is 39371.

Gordon Discusses Cedars-Sinai Mural at Jewish Center

Leo Gordon, MD, medical adviser to the Cedars-Sinai Historical Conservancy, presented From Concept to Canvas — The Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Mural — Jewish Contributions to Medicine to the adult education section of the Merage Jewish Community Center in Irvine on Feb. 21.

Leo Gordon

Leo Gordon, MD, outlined the evolution of the Harvey Morse Auditorium mural, Jewish Contributions to Medicine.

The Merage center is the hub of Jewish life in Orange County. This presentation was part of Merage's series Great Jewish Americans.

Gordon outlined the evolution of the Harvey Morse Auditorium mural, Jewish Contributions to Medicine. He reviewed the work of the mural committee, the collaboration with the artist, Terry Schoonhoven, and the contributions of the late Leon Morgenstern, MD.

His remarks focused on Jewish-American contributions to medicine.

Gordon outlined the evolution and contributions of Jewish-Americans who appear on the mural: Abraham Flexner, Jesse Lazear, MD, Rosalyn Yalow, PhD, Jonas Salk, MD, and Albert Sabin, MD. He also reviewed the touching story of Janusz Korczak, MD, the pediatrician of the Warsaw Ghetto.

A reception followed Gordon's presentation at which he regaled an audience of benefactors with humorous anecdotes about Cedars-Sinai history.

CS-Link Central Has New Design, Easier Navigation

Take a few moments to check out the newly designed CS-Link Central — your source for CS-Link information and resources. The website now offers:

  • A fresh look and feel
  • Easier-to-use layout and navigation
  • Better search capabilities
  • Mobile-friendly functionality

Now you can more easily find what you're looking for, whether that's a job aid, training information (e.g., e-learning modules, course catalog) or the latest information about ongoing initiatives and upcoming enhancements.

CS-Link Tip: Reminder Email

 You should check your CS-Link InBasket daily. There may be times when you wish you could get a notification to your regular email that you have a message waiting for you in CS-Link.

You can. Just set up an email reminder about InBasket notifications. These can fire as frequently as daily, or less often, as you desire.

To do this, when you are in CS-Link's InBasket, click on User Settings. The third tab is called Reminder Email. You enter the email address you would like to receive the notification, and the types of messages you want to hear about (results, patient calls, staff messages, etc.). More information and a screen shot are at CS-Link Central.

To learn more about CS-Link and get through your day more efficiently, come to a Physician Efficiency Training session. The sessions last 90 minutes and take place in Cafeteria Conference Room C. The schedule:

  • Wednesday, March 23, noon: Closing Encounters
  • Friday, April 8, 7:30 a.m.: Navigating
  • Wednesday, April 20, 5 p.m.: Navigating
  • Thursday, April 21, noon: Navigating
  • Tuesday, May 10, 7:30 a.m.: Preference Lists
  • Thursday, May 12, noon: Preference Lists
  • Thursday, May 19, 5 p.m.: Preference Lists

As always, if you have questions, reach out to an Enterprise Information Services physician at groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.

Topics Sought for Morgenstern Debate

Morgenstern Leon 140px

Leon Morgenstern, MD, was the founding director of Surgery at Cedars-Sinai. He died in 2012.

The 13th annual Dr. Leon Morgenstern Great Debates in Clinical Medicine Resident Competition will convene on Friday, June 3. The debate committee is soliciting topics.

The chosen topic must cut across all specialties and must be of timely import to the Cedars community.

Please send your suggestions to Leo Gordon, MD, Morgenstern Debate coordinator, at leo.gordon@cshs.org.

Last year's debate is available for viewing. Contact Gordon for access.

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

The Circle of Friends program honored 197 people in February.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Angel S. Amador
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Mahul B. Amin, MD
  • Latika L. Anderson-Gilkey
  • John Ivan M. Ang
  • Rene Arriola
  • Laura G. Audell, MD, MS
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • Yalda Azarmehr, MD
  • David E. Baires
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • David Baker
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Arash Bereliani, MD
  • Jason A. Berkley, DO
  • Paula Bianca C. Bernarte, RN
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD
  • Dana Burlingame, RN
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Simona Campa, RN
  • Robert M. Casson
  • Rhona M. Castillo, RN
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Yzhar Charuzi, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Jeffrey M. Chung, MD
  • Arnold C. Cinman, MD
  • Efigenia Climaco, RN
  • Paul Cohart, MD
  • Amparo Colico
  • Stephen T. Copen, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Kenneth A. Corre, MD
  • Ram C. Dandillaya, MD
  • Payman Danielpour,MD
  • Seper Dezfoli, MD
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • Suhail Dohad, MD
  • Ashkan Ehdaie, MD
  • Yaron Elad, MD
  • Lynne Emma, RN, MPH
  • Fantu Engeda
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Roseller A. Esmundo
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Edward J. Feldman, MD
  • Jennifer C. Fleming, ACNP-BC
  • Phillip R. Fleshner, MD
  • Kristen Franzese, RN
  • Arnold S. Friedman, MD
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Lisa Girard, RN
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Theodore B. Goldstein, MD
  • Crystal F. Gonzalez, RN
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Leland M. Green, MD
  • Sarah C. Greene, MD
  • Robert A. Gross, MD
  • Erroll L. Hackner, MD
  • Antoine Hage, MD
  • Patricia B. Hain, MSN, RN
  • David S. Hallegua, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • John G. Harold, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Jeremy R. Herman, MD
  • Emmanuel E. Hernandez
  • John Carlo Herrera
  • Ryan M. Hodges, RN
  • Martin L. Hopp, MD
  • Hsing-Chun Hsieh, RN
  • Leonel A. Hunt, MD
  • Emelia E. James, RN
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Katherin "Katie" A. Johnson, RN
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Sheila Kahwaty PA-C, MPAS
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH
  • Anna Khamdaranikone
  • Ali Khoynezhad, MD, PhD
  • Eugene Kim, MD
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Asher Kimchi, MD
  • Nuriat Kisitu, RN
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Keith L. Klein, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Peter Koh, OD
  • Ryan H. Kotton, MD
  • Stephanie Koven, MD
  • Marcella D. Kurtzman, RN, OCN
  • Linda H. Lam, RN
  • Christina R. Lester, RN
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Nora B. Levid, BSN, RN
  • Phillip L. Levine, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Jane E. Lipman, PT
  • Karla Lopez, RN
  • Victoria T. Macsbarango
  • David P. Magner, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Michelle F. Marcos, RN
  • Malcolm L. Margolin, MD
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD
  • Michael J. Mazouz, MD
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Dorothy T. Melvin
  • Richard J. Metz, MD
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Pascale R. Middleton, RN
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Zab Mosenifar, MD
  • Hattie M. Munn
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Norman J. Nemoy, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Leslie Nieva
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Dayanara Ortega
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Cecilia Patino, RN
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Jesus E. Perez
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Rouhi Rahban
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Ernesto Raymundo Garcia
  • Jamie M. Rey, BSN, RN, RN-C
  • Dionne Reyes, RN
  • Sepehr Rokhsar, MD
  • Sonja Louisa Rosen, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Soraya A. Ross, MD
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Melissa E. Rue, RN
  • Ruth "Virginia" Russell, MD
  • Amy S. Rutman, MD
  • Wendy L. Sacks, MD
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Shahram Sepehri, MD
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • John L. Sherman, MD
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Steven M. Simons, MD
  • Jonathan K. Slade, RN
  • Robin M. Smith
  • Jason Snibbe, MD
  • Jay J. Stein, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD
  • Martin Stern, PhD, MPH
  • Charles D. Swerdlow, MD
  • Steven Sykes, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Amabelle G. Talavera
  • Victor F. Tapson, MD
  • Daniel Tetrick
  • Hitoshi "Tommy" Tomizawa, MD, MPH
  • Jose E. Torres
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Mark K. Urman, MD
  • Eric Vasiliauskas, MD
  • Katherine M. Veling, MS, PT, OCS
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Roby Roxanne S. Vida, RN
  • Ariel E. Weber, BSN, RN, CCRN
  • Michael H. Weisman, MD
  • Robert N. Wolfe, MD
  • Clement C. Yang, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • Arthur M. Zapata, RN