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PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY January 2017 | Archived Issues

Remembering an Inspiring Friend and Colleague

Bruce Gewertz, MD, remembers an inspiring friend and colleague who refused to be confined by his physical limitations and went on to build a successful career as a consultant to nonprofit hospitals, universities and foundations.

» Read more

Douglas to Lead New Orbital, Thyroid Eye Disease Center

Raymond S. Douglas, MD

Renowned oculoplastic surgeon Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD, has joined Cedars-Sinai to lead its new International Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease Center. In his new role, Douglas will develop a multidisciplinary clinic to provide highly specialized care to patients with thyroid eye disease and other complex orbital diseases such as cancer and trauma.

» Read more

Spotlighting Brain Injuries in Sports and War

Peter Rhee, MD

Peter Rhee, MD, a nationally known trauma surgeon who treated former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, will deliver the keynote speech at the 2017 Regenerative Medicine Institute Symposium in February. He is one of many experts who will address the Feb. 9-10 meeting, "Regeneration and Neurological Trauma: From the Playing Field to the Battle Field."

» Read more

Trauma Registrars Attend Classes at Cedars-Sinai

New and veteran trauma registrars filled two days of ICD-10 courses at Cedars-Sinai this month. Part of Cedars-Sinai’s mission as a Level I trauma hospital is to be a leader in trauma education. The courses featured lectures and case studies for coding ICD-10 injury diagnoses and procedures.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for December

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 265 people in December. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

FDA Issues Warning Against Use of Pioglitazone and General Anesthetic Drugs for Pregnant Women and Children

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning against the use of the Type 2 diabetes medicine pioglitazone, which has been linked to an increased risk of bladder cancer. The FDA is also warning against the repeated or lengthy use of general anesthetic and sedation drugs in young children and pregnant women. Additionally, the agency has determined the risk of stop-smoking medications may not be as serious as once suspected. And the agency is alerting physicians that a commercial facility that tests for Zika virus has reported false positive results.

» Read more

MD/RN Collaborative Survey Shows Positive Impact

Results from the MD/RN Collaborative Satisfaction Survey show that the program is having a positive impact on working relationships between physicians and nurses. More than 400 physicians and 1,400 nurses recently provided feedback on how to enhance collaboration, trust and respect among caregivers.

» Read more

Residents Win Awards From American College of Surgeons

Two surgical residents from Cedars-Sinai were recognized at the recent annual meeting of the Southern California Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. Nic Manguso, MD, and Halley Vora, MD, won awards.

» Read more

Wagner Earns Thanks From Surgery Chair

Bruce Gewertz, MD, chair of the Deparment of Surgery, recently thanked Willis Wagner, MD, for his dedicated and effective service as clinical chief of the department. Wagner continues his leadership in the elected position of clinical chief of Vascular Surgery.

» Read more

Alfred D. Katz, MD: 1925-2016

Alfred D. Katz, MD, who joined the Department of Surgery in 1959 and served with distinction for nearly a half century, passed away on Dec. 30, 2016. He was 91.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Updating Immunization Orders

cs-link logo

Here are some helpful tips to navigate CS-Link™ if you are updating immunizations, writing compounded medications and taking more than one set of vitals.

» Read more

Remembering an Inspiring Friend and Colleague

By Bruce Gewertz, MD
Surgeon-in-Chief, Chair of the Department of Surgery

I lost a longtime friend and colleague last year. Steve was a highly valued and successful consultant to nonprofit hospitals, universities and foundations. He ran his own business out of pocket — to my knowledge he had no office, just a phone and a business card. He was peripatetic, traveling coast to coast whenever needed.

More than anything, he was a consummate connector of people. At his memorial service, a friend said he was the "networker of the century." No one could dispute that. Due to his 50 years of travel coupled with an outgoing personality and inquisitiveness, there was hardly anyone you knew that he didn't!

Steve was distinguished as well by a significant physical feature. For whatever reason (no one that I knew could tell me and I didn't inquire with his family), he had a severe spinal deformity with partial paralysis of the right side of his body. He walked with a pronounced limp and visible tilt.

To my knowledge Steve never tolerated any restrictions due to his physical issues. He traveled the world fearlessly. His favorite image was a picture of him in racing gear, proudly posed by the high-end bicycle he taught himself to ride, for the first time, in his late 50s. I don't think it was an easy task.

On the long trip home from his memorial service, I thought about Steve's unique career as a "creative disrupter." He so often came into difficult situations as an outsider. He consulted as if he had nothing to lose from telling the truth and no apologies for forcing reappraisals of long held beliefs and strategies.

I now understand that the experience Steve gained by succeeding in physical activities in alternative ways informed his unique perspectives and his ability to see things differently. His personal narrative and his complete disregard of any limitations was self-evident and made those of us who interfaced with him hard-pressed to opt out of the courage we needed to forge a new path.

He was resolute and unyielding in living his life so vigorously that it enhanced his credibility. I think this effect was so powerful precisely because he made no mention of any limitation — he just did everything and anything without complaint.

If we are exceptionally lucky, we leave a legacy for our family and friends. In the case of my friend Steve, I hope I can hold on to his courage, resourcefulness and willingness to look at things from a different angle. For awhile at least, I'll try to stop complaining about whatever is ailing me — and realize that one person's disability is another's inspiration.

Douglas to Lead New Orbital, Thyroid Eye Disease Center

Raymond S. Douglas, MD, PhD

Renowned oculoplastic surgeon Raymond S. Douglas MD, PhD, has joined Cedars-Sinai to lead its new International Orbital and Thyroid Eye Disease Center.

Douglas will develop a multidisciplinary clinic to provide highly specialized care to patients with thyroid eye disease (TED or Graves' eye disease) and other complex orbital diseases such as cancer and trauma.

One in 100 people will be affected by TED, an autoimmune condition in which immune cells attack the thyroid gland, which responds by secreting an excess amount of thyroid hormone.

At the clinic, patients will have coordinated care by recognized specialists, including orbital surgeons, strabismus surgeons, orthoptists, neuro-ophthalmologists, dry eye specialists, endocrinologists and rheumatologists.

The program will continue to expand research into the treatments on thyroid-associated orbitopathy. Many of the processes by which TED causes inflammation of tissue surrounding the eye have been unraveled and new treatments are on the horizon.

Patients with this condition may experience severe swelling and bulging eyes, which in advanced cases can lead to loss of vision. The center plans to evaluate several promising therapeutic agents that interrupt the disease process identified through research by Douglas.

Douglas comes to Cedars-Sinai from the University of Michigan Health System, where he served as professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and director of the Thyroid Eye Disease Center.

His new position, he said, will set the course for Cedars-Sinai to become the pre-eminent international center for the treatment of TED and other orbital conditions.

"This multidisciplinary approach will help us deliver even higher-quality care and a more comprehensive treatment plan for our patients," Douglas said. "The physicians at Cedars-Sinai are world leaders and together we will provide concierge cutting edge care to patients in Los Angeles and the world."

Spotlighting Brain Injuries in Sports and War

Peter Rhee, MD

Peter Rhee, MD, a nationally known trauma surgeon who treated former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, will deliver the keynote speech at the 2017 Regenerative Medicine Institute Symposium in February.

Rhee, who cared for Giffords after she was shot in the head during a 2011 assassination attempt, is one of many experts who will address the Feb. 9-10 meeting at Harvey Morse Conference Center. The symposium, "Regeneration and Neurological Trauma: From the Playing Field to the Battle Field," is co-sponsored by the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, the Department of Surgery and the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, a Cedars-Sinai affiliate.

The speakers include:

  • Rhee, senior vice president, chief of Acute Care Surgery and medical director of the Marcus Trauma Center at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. He also is a professor of Surgery at Emory University and Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. A retired U.S. Navy captain with 24 years of active duty, he is a founding member of the military's Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care and serves on the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. He is the author of the book Trauma Red: The Making of a Surgeon in War and in America's Cities.
  • Retired U.S. Army Col. Dallas Hack, MD, former director of the Combat Casualty Care Research Program and former chair of the Joint Program Committee 6 (Combat Casualty Care) of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command at Fort Detrick, Maryland.
  • Ann McKee, MD, professor of Neurology and Pathology at Boston University School of Medicine and director of the Neuropathology Service for the New England Veterans Administration Medical Centers and the Brain Banks for the Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center. She is a pioneer in the study of brain damage caused by repetitive injury in athletes.
  • Donald Ingber, MD, PhD, founding director of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. He also is professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Ingber is a world-renowned expert on translational medicine, tissue engineering and "organ on a chip" technology to advance personalized medicine.

The symposium will feature sessions on spinal cord injury; imaging approaches for traumatic brain injury; central nervous system modeling and clinical evaluation; and therapeutic approaches to central nervous system injury. There also will be poster sessions and a special evening panel on the topic of concussion, with clinicians, investigators and professional athletes.

The general attendance fee is $225; $50 for Cedars-Sinai graduate students, residents and fellows.

For more information or to register, visit the RMI Symposium site. If you have questions, contact Laura DeZell at 310-248-8581 or laura.dezell@cshs.org.

Trauma Registrars Attend Classes at Cedars-Sinai

New and veteran trauma registrars filled two days of ICD-10 courses at Cedars-Sinai this month.

Part of Cedars-Sinai's mission as a Level I trauma hospital is to be a leader in trauma education.

The courses featured lectures and case studies for coding ICD-10 injury diagnoses and procedures. The importance of accurately coding traumatic injuries has far-reaching implications for trauma hospitals and trauma systems. Accurate coding influences research, injury prevention, epidemiology, funding, performance improvement, national benchmarking and legislative initiatives.

The courses are designed to enhance knowledge for coding traumatic injuries and the procedures required for national, state and local agencies. These steps help ensure that the severity of illness, mortality rates and intensity of service are properly captured.

Circle of Friends Honorees for December

The Circle of Friends program honored 265 people in December.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

Click here for more information about the program and for a list of past honorees.

  • Krystianne Nigel Abrenica, RN
  • Kenneth Adashek, MD
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia Davis, MN, RN, AOCN
  • John B. Andrews, MD
  • David Austin, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD
  • Mark Bamberger, MD
  • Lorelei W. Bangate, CHAA
  • Anca Maria Barbu, MD
  • Gladis A. Barravecchio
  • Anat Ben-Shlomo, MD
  • Daniel S. Berman, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • John F. Bray, MD
  • Darina Brezhnev, PharmD
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Barry J. Brock, MD
  • Tara A. Brooke, RN
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Kerri M. Brown, RN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD
  • Blessie M. Bulaon
  • Christiane Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Allison H. Canavan, MD
  • James L. Caplan, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • Bojan Cercek, MD, PhD
  • Michael L. Chaikin, MD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Kirk Y. Chang, MD
  • Timothy Charlton, MD
  • Yzhar Charuzi, MD
  • Morgan Check, NP
  • Connie Chein, MD
  • Ray M. Chu, MD
  • Alice P. Chung, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Stephen R. Corday, MD
  • Xiaojiang Cui, PhD
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD
  • Laura O. Daniels, RN-BC, BSN
  • Exekiel J. David
  • Sara Dayanim, MD
  • Teresa M. Dean, MD
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Anuj B. Desai, MD
  • Premal J. Desai, MD
  • Stephen C. Deutsch, MD
  • Alice R. Dick, MD
  • Suhail Dohad, MD
  • Jean A. Dolaway, PT
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD
  • Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD
  • Martha L. Dzioba
  • Yaron Elad, MD
  • Carmen I. Escobar
  • Richard Essner, MD
  • Amanda T. Ewing, MD
  • Joel D. Feinstein, MD
  • Phillip R. Fleshner, MD
  • Alexander P. Ford, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Joyce N. Fox, MD
  • Stuart Friedman, MD
  • David M. Frisch, MD
  • Larry Froch, MD
  • Gerhard J. Fuchs, MD
  • Amy Marie Gann, RN
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Joel M. Geiderman, MD
  • Leena C. Gibson, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Sherry L. Goldman, RN, NP
  • Theodore B. Goldstein, MD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Violette G. Gray, MD
  • Leland M. Green, MD
  • Olga Grigorian, RN
  • Vesna Grubic RN, MPH
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • Solomon I. Hamburg, MD
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Nebil S. Hassen
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD
  • Timothy D. Henry, MD
  • Emmanuel E. Hernandez
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Jethro L. Hu, MD
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Jacqueline Jones, RN
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Neel R. Joshi, MD
  • Joanna Juntila, RN
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sousan Karimi, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • Scott R. Karlan, MD
  • Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD
  • Harold L. Karpman, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Raj Khandwalla, MD
  • Yasaman Kiarad
  • Howard H. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Sang D. Kim, MD
  • Terrence T. Kim, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Robert Klapper, MD
  • Keith L. Klein, MD
  • Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD
  • Spencer K. Koerner, MD
  • Thomas J. Kremen, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Anna Belle R. Labrador, RN
  • Magda Leavitt, MSN, RN
  • Ricardo Ledesma
  • Paul C. Lee, MD
  • Ella Louise Leggett
  • Madeline S. Lerman, BSN, RN
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael S. Levine, MD
  • Andrew J. Li, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD
  • Howard L. Liu, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD
  • Joseph Loewy, MD
  • Jacqueline Longino
  • Karla Lopez, RN
  • Peter G. Lopez
  • Aubrina C. Lyons
  • Cheryle C. Maano-Requejo
  • Jonathan I. Macy, MD
  • Laila C. Madi, RN
  • Hooman Madyoon, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Adam N. Mamelak, MD
  • Cindy Margolis, RN
  • Kalinda S. Marshall
  • David N. Matsumura, MD
  • Peggy Mays
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Bridget D. McLoughlin, MSN, RN-BC, CCTC
  • Mercedes Mendez
  • Erin Meschter, MD
  • Raquel V. Michel
  • Stewart Middler, MD, PhD
  • Vladana Milisavljevic, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Nancy Moldawer
  • Avinash Mondkar, MD
  • Charles N. Moon, MD
  • Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD
  • Hattie M. Munn
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Mary C. Nasmyth, MD
  • Annie Neal, NCT
  • Norman J. Nemoy, MD
  • Alan C. Newman, DDS
  • Anita N. Newman, MD
  • Christopher S. Ng, MD
  • Roy D. Nini, MD
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Raena S. Olsen, DO
  • Dapheny Opoku Alexander
  • Guy D. Paiement, MD
  • Ronald L. Paquette, MD
  • Dorothy J. Park, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Raquel E. Pena
  • Rema D. Pendon, RN
  • Alice Peng, MD
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD
  • Mark Pimentel, MD
  • Howard E. Pitchon, MD
  • Robert B. Pompa, MD
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Debra L. Potyk, RN
  • Barry D. Pressman, MD
  • Dechu P. Puliyanda, MD
  • Soroush A. Ramin, MD
  • Jeffrey Rapp, MD
  • Jon Rasak, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Victor C. Reyes
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Eva Rozycki, BSN, RN
  • Paula Rubin, BS
  • Jeremy D. Rudnick, MD
  • Stephen A. Sacks, MD
  • Wendy L. Sacks, MD
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Enrique Sanchez
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Maria C. Sarmiento, RN
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD
  • Kevin Scher, MD
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Jessica L. Schneider, MD
  • Stephen E. Schwartz, DPM
  • Amar J. Shah, MD
  • Omid A. Shaye, MD
  • Michael M. Shehata, MD
  • Nancy L. Sicotte, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD
  • Americo Simonini, MD
  • Enrique Slodownik, MD
  • Tracey L. Solitare, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Monica Sondhi, MD
  • Andrew Ira Spitzer, MD
  • Andrea L. Stailey, NP
  • Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN
  • Jay J. Stein, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Colin Stokol, MD
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD
  • Leslie Stricke, MD
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Charles D. Swerdlow, MD
  • Steven Sykes, MD
  • Nicholas R. Szumski, MD
  • Lillian Szydlo, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Siamak Tabib, MD
  • Michele Tagliati, MD
  • Mark Tajon
  • David B. Thordarson, MD
  • Sam S. Torbati, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD
  • Diane M. Tryciecky, RN
  • Gregory Tsushima, MD
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Taz E. Varkey, MD
  • Marina Vaysburd, MD
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD
  • Robert A. Vescio, MD
  • Carl Violano, MD
  • Olga Voroshilovsky, MD
  • Andrew S. Wachtel, MD
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • Cristi R. Ware
  • Jason L. Weiner, Rabbi
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • America White, RN
  • Philip A. Yalowitz, MD
  • Michael C. Yang, MD
  • Payam R. Yashar, MD
  • Amara Yob, BSN, RN, OCN
  • Arthur M. Zapata, RN
  • Nancy A. Zimmerman

FDA Issues Warning Against Use of Pioglitazone and General Anesthetic Drugs for Pregnant Women and Children

Pharmacy Focus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has concluded that use of the Type 2 diabetes medicine
pioglitazone may be linked to in an increased risk of bladder cancer. The FDA is warning healthcare professionals against using pioglitazone in patients with active bladder cancer, and should carefully consider the benefits and risks before using it with patients who have a history of bladder cancer.

The FDA website has more information.

FDA: General Anesthetic and Sedation Drugs May Affect Child Development

The FDA is warning that repeated or lengthy use of general anesthetic and sedation drugs during surgeries or procedures in children under 3 years old or in pregnant women during their third trimester may affect the development of children’s brains. FDA will continue to monitor the use of the drugs and will update the public if additional information becomes available.

The FDA website has more information.

FDA: Risks of Stop-Smoking Drugs Lower Than Previously Suspected

The FDA has determined the risk of serious side effects on mood, behavior or thinking with the stop-smoking medicines Chantix and Zyban is lower than previously suspected. The risk of these mental health side effects is still present for those being treated for mental illness or those with a history of mental illness. However, most people did not exhibit side effects, and a recent trial confirms that the benefits of stopping smoking outweigh the risks of these medicines.

The FDA has more information.

FDA: False Positives Reported With Zika Virus Test

The FDA is alerting physicians who care for pregnant women that the commercial testing facility Laboratory Corporation of America has reported false positive results from its ZIKV Detect test, which detects Zika virus. Because confirmation tests may take a week to a month to complete, the FDA is issuing this alert so that healthcare providers and patients are aware of a higher likelihood of false positive results.

The FDA has more information.

MD/RN Collaborative Survey Shows Positive Impact

Results from the MD/RN Collaborative Satisfaction Survey show that the program is having a positive impact on working relationships between physicians and nurses. More than 400 physicians and 1,400 nurses recently provided feedback on how to enhance collaboration, trust and respect among caregivers.

"The good news is that we have continued to improve overall compared to previous years," said Chris Ng, MD, co-chair of the MD/RN Collaborative and director of Laparoscopic Urologic Oncology and Robotic Urologic Surgery at the Cedars-Sinai Minimally Invasive Urology Institute.

The overall effectiveness of the MD/RN Collaborative received a 4.45 out of 5 rating, with physicians and nurses responding that they felt like a part of a team that strives for excellence. Scores showed the initiative is providing a useful forum to address patient safety issues and other concerns.

Nurses showed statistically significant improvement in responses regarding how physicians treat staff members, explain orders, return phone calls, communicate openly, and include nurses on patient rounds and care coordination. Overall positive feedback from nurses rose from a score of 3.75 out of 5 in 2014 to 3.9 in 2016.

Physicians commended nursing staff on their expertise and their quality care. Physicians remained largely consistent between 2014 and 2016 with an overall MD/RN Collaborative score of 4.5.

"We would really like to thank our doctors because this means that they have made every effort to collaborate with nurses and that is much appreciated by all of nursing," said Peachy Hain, MSN, RN, co-chair of the MD/RN Collaborative and director of Medical, Surgical and Rehabilitation Nursing Services. "The evidence is in the scores."

For more information, visit the MD/RN Collaborative website or email peachy.hain@cshs.org.

Residents Win Awards From American College of Surgeons

Halley Vora, MD

Nic Manguso, MD

Two surgical residents from Cedars-Sinai were recognized at the recent annual meeting of the Southern California Chapter of the American College of Surgeons.

Halley Vora, MD, won the Best Resident Research Award for her paper "Lobular Carcinoma In Situ: A 15 Year Single Institution Review." Nic Manguso, MD, was honored with the Physician-in-Training Cancer Research Award for his paper "Prognostic Factors Associated with Outcomes in Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumors."

Wagner Earns Thanks From Surgery Chair

Bruce Gewertz, MD, chair of the Deparment of Surgery, (left) recently thanked Willis Wagner, MD, for his dedicated and effective service as clinical chief of the department. Wagner continues his leadership in the elected position of clinical chief of Vascular Surgery.

Alfred D. Katz, MD: 1925-2016

Alfred D. Katz, MD, who joined the Department of Surgery in 1959 and served with distinction for nearly a half century, passed away on Dec. 30, 2016. He was 91.

The surgeon who specialized in head and neck surgery was born on Nov. 22, 1925, in Long Branch, New Jersey. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin after serving in the U.S. Army in Europe during World War II, and later attended Yale Medical School.

He chaired and held leadership positions at the Jewish Federation Council, Anti­-Defamation League and Temple Emanuel, and was a founding member of the Skirball Cultural Center.

He is survived by his wife, Cecelia, four children, 10 grandchildren and one great­-grandchild.

CS-Link Tip: Updating Immunization Orders

Here are a few tips for navigating CS-Link™ in the new year:

  • When it comes to updating immunizations that are ordered and not given, the option to defer immunization orders will no longer be available. Please use the "delete" option and reorder the vaccination as needed at a future date.
  • When writing compounded medications, remember they cannot be e-prescribed. For nonscheduled compounded medications ordered as an outpatient prescription, the order class will now be defaulted to "normal," which will automatically e-fax the medications to the pharmacy. For scheduled medications, the default will be "no print," and will require a written prescription. (Compounded medications are not eligible for EPCS and controlled substances cannot be e-faxed).
  • When taking more than one set of vitals, use the link: vitalsmultiple. This link will display the comments and is useful for orthostatic vitals.

If you have questions, email groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.