Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

President's Perspective: Mission And Values

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

She was driving southbound on Vermont Avenue, having just gotten off work to pick up her son from after-school care. In a split second, a speeding northbound driver veered sharply into her lane, causing a head-on collision. Los Angeles Fire Department trucks were on the scene in minutes and quickly determined that her injuries were severe: traumatic brain injury, serious internal bleeding, multiple skull and spinal fractures, and a crushed left leg. While the above is a hypothetical example, on a daily basis in Los Angeles every one of us potentially is just a few seconds away from a traumatic injury.

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Influenza Activity

By Clement C. Yang, MD, Chief of Staff

Influenza activity at Cedars-Sinai is increasing, and activity in California is considered widespread by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

» Read more

Gift to Create Kao Autoimmunity Institute

Cedars-Sinai today announced a $20 million gift from Dr. and Mrs. Min H. Kao and the Kao Family Foundation to create the Kao Autoimmunity Institute to advance research and treatment of rheumatologic diseases. The gift also will establish the Scleroderma Program within the institute to provide interdisciplinary and integrated care for scleroderma patients and to support research, outreach, training and education to help those with the disease.

» Read more

Hanukkah Candlelighting Ceremony Set for Dec. 23

Cedars-Sinai will host its annual public Hanukkah candlelighting ceremony on Monday, Dec. 23, at 5 p.m. in the Plaza Lobby. Staff and family members are invited to the ceremony, led by Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department. 

» Read more

Training for Incident Reporting System to Begin

Cedars-Sinai will roll out a new incident reporting system, CS-Safe, on Tuesday, Jan. 21. The new system is designed to more effectively document near misses, good catches and safety events that affect patients, staff and visitors. All staff at the medical center and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, both clinical and nonclinical, are encouraged to use the CS-Safe platform.

» Read more

Recognition for High Rate of Flu Vaccinations

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health recognized Cedars-Sinai and two of its affiliated hospitals for vaccinating 90% or more of its employees during the 2018-19 influenza season.

» Read more

Ray Charles Foundation Establishes Scholarship

The Ray Charles Foundation has made an investment in the future, donating $1 million to fund a new neurosurgery scholarship program at Cedars-Sinai. Under the direction of Keith L. Black, MD, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, scholarship recipients will receive personalized, mentored research training from Cedars-Sinai's neurosciences faculty while conducting their own research projects.

» Read more

Stem Cells Don't Take a Day Off During the Holidays

While most of us were stuffing ourselves with turkey and pumpkin pie at home on Thanksgiving Day, the staff members at one Cedars-Sinai laboratory were on the job, feeding stem cells. "Stem cells do not observe national holidays," says Loren Ornelas-Menendez, the manager of a lab that converts samples of adult skin and blood cells into stem cells—the amazing "factories" our bodies use to make our cells. These special cells help medical scientists learn how diseases develop and how they might be cured.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 195 people in November. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Patient Reminder Lists

You may have wanted to follow up on certain tasks with patients at some point. Patient Reminder Lists in CS-Link™ is one way to keep track of patient-related tasks, even if they may not be related to a specific visit or admission. A Patient Reminder List can hold a list of patients that you may want to keep track of for research or educational purposes. 

» Read more

President's Perspective: Mission And Values

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

She was driving southbound on Vermont Avenue, having just gotten off work to pick up her son from after-school care. In a split second, a speeding northbound driver veered sharply into her lane, causing a head-on collision. Los Angeles Fire Department trucks were on the scene in minutes and quickly determined that her injuries were severe: traumatic brain injury, serious internal bleeding, multiple skull and spinal fractures, and a crushed left leg. 

While the above is a hypothetical example, on a daily basis in Los Angeles every one of us potentially is just a few seconds away from a traumatic injury. Whether it's a head-on car collision, a serious power-tool accident, a train crash or a gun shooting, traumatic injuries usually happen without warning, and lives are changed in an instant.  

As one of just four Level I adult trauma centers in Los Angeles County, Cedars-Sinai receives the most severely injured trauma patients from throughout the county.

For this and many other reasons, our trauma center serves as a great example of Cedars-Sinai's role in strengthening the health of the community and as a reflection of our values throughout the institution.

Equity of Care

Every patient receives the same high-quality care from our expert team, regardless of their background, income, insurance status or any other factor.

Regional Resource

As a Level I trauma center, we provide the most advanced clinical and technical expertise for trauma care 24/7. For example, Level I trauma centers always have a trauma surgeon available in-house, as well as a neurosurgeon, orthopaedic surgeon and other specialists readily available around-the-clock. Because there are only four Level I adult trauma centers in the entire county, we receive and treat patients from across the region. Although it is costly to maintain a Level I trauma center, it is an important part of our commitment to the community.

Supporting the Uninsured

For those trauma center patients who are uninsured or underinsured, Cedars-Sinai bears the cost of the unreimbursed portion of their care. Due to the severity of trauma injuries and the length of hospitalization required, Cedars-Sinai's financial contribution can be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars for an individual patient. Because Cedars-Sinai bears the cost of keeping our trauma center open, we enable other hospitals without Level I trauma centers to keep their costs down, which is a reason they can offer lower prices.

Teamwork

I've often said that healthcare is a team sport, and our trauma center is an excellent example. Working under very urgent timeframes, every member of the trauma team understands their role and the roles of their colleagues. As a result, they work together seamlessly. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, surgical techs, imaging specialists, pharmacists, social workers and many others all play crucial roles in caring for our trauma patients during their stays at Cedars-Sinai.

Research and Education

As an academic medical center, research and education are key to our mission. Although the immediate focus in our trauma center is always on patient care, the team also conducts important research on patient outcomes after severe injuries and the basic science involved in trauma care. For example, one of their recent translational research projects—showing improved survival rates by using beta-blocker medication immediately after traumatic brain injury—has changed trauma procedures nationwide. Equally important, the trauma center conducts numerous community education programs on topics such as injury prevention and teen driving. Our large clinical volume and academic focus have greatly expanded the opportunities for postgraduate education with highly prized fellowships in orthopaedic trauma and in surgical critical care and trauma.

Our trauma center provides a great example of the institutional values and community commitment that are demonstrated every day throughout Cedars-Sinai. When combined with the expertise and compassion of each of our staff and volunteers, you begin to get a sense of the important role Cedars-Sinai serves in caring for and strengthening the many communities of Los Angeles.

 

Letter From Chief of Staff: Influenza Activity

By Clement C. Yang, MD, Chief of Staff

Colleagues,

Influenza activity at Cedars-Sinai is increasing, and activity in California is considered widespread by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Please keep in mind the following during this year’s flu season:

  • Use droplet precautions for all patients with suspected or confirmed influenza, even pending test results. When outside their room, patients should wear a mask.
  • The Primary Seasonal Influenza Panel (FLRFLX) is the preferred diagnostic test; it tests for Influenza (A and B), RSV and rhinovirus. Sensitivity is high when performed on a nasopharyngeal (high nasal) swab. Improper swab technique (such as a lower nasal swab) may lead to false-negative results.
  • The rapid influenza EIA test performed in the ED has poor sensitivity and cannot rule out infection. Beginning today, the Microbiology lab will begin automatically performing PCR for inpatients with a negative rapid EIA test collected in the ED. This is done using the swab collected in the ED, avoiding the need to repeat a nasopharyngeal swab.
  • Treat all hospitalized or other high-risk patients promptly with antivirals (typically oseltamivir) when influenza is suspected or confirmed.
  • Avoid working while ill. Even with mild symptoms, healthcare workers can spread influenza to patients. Wearing a mask is not a substitute for staying home while ill.

The 2019 Influenza Guidance document (below) provides additional information on testing, treatment and infection-prevention measures.

2019 Influenza Guidance Sheet (PDF)   

As a reminder, all employees and medical staff must get their annual flu vaccination and wear a green "badge buddy" during flu season (Nov. 1—April 30). Medical staff can attest their vaccination status through CS-Link™ (an Inbox message was sent to all providers in October). Exceptions are only granted for those with a valid exemption granted through Employee Health Services.

Additional information can be found here:

Hospital Epidemiology Influenza Website

Los Angeles County Health Department

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Thank you all for your efforts in protecting our patients and staff during this flu season.

 

Gift to Create Kao Autoimmunity Institute

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A transformative gift from Dr. and Mrs. Min H. Kao and the Kao Family Foundation will establish the Kao Autoimmunity Institute at Cedars-Sinai. Photo by Cedars-Sinai.

Cedars-Sinai today announced a $20 million gift from Dr. and Mrs. Min H. Kao and the Kao Family Foundation to create the Kao Autoimmunity Institute to advance research and treatment of rheumatologic diseases.

The gift also will establish the Scleroderma Program within the institute to provide interdisciplinary and integrated care for scleroderma patients and to support research, outreach, training and education to help those with the disease.

"Our family is fortunate to be in a position to partner with an academic medical center that places a premium on patient care and game-changing medical research," said Dr. Min H. Kao. "We truly hope this gift will enable Cedars-Sinai to develop a nationally recognized institute that brings lifesaving treatments to those who experience debilitating diseases."

More than 80 autoimmune diseases affect an estimated 24 million people in the U.S., according to the National Institutes of Health. Patients suffer from a broad spectrum of disorders, including scleroderma, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis, multiple sclerosis, Grave's disease, inflammatory bowel disease and Type 1 diabetes. These diseases are thought to be caused when the immune system—meant to defend against illness—begins attacking the body's own organs, tissues and cells.

Clinical leaders and research scientists at Cedars-Sinai say the Kao gift will lay the groundwork for important medical advances in understanding autoimmune diseases and provide for the creation of a Scleroderma center of excellence.

The new Kao Autoimmunity Institute and Scleroderma Program will be part of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine. They will bring together clinicians, investigators and allied health professionals from a variety of disciplines across Cedars-Sinai and its affiliated hospitals and care sites. The institute and program will be led by new directors, along with a new director of the Division of Rheumatology.

"The Kao family gift creates a unique opportunity to assemble the best researchers and clinicians together to better understand autoimmune diseases and to develop more effective treatments for our patients," said Paul W. Noble, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine and director of the Women's Guild Lung Institute.

"Our investigators will have the opportunity to improve patient care and outcomes by studying disease onset and progression, as well as the key roles the microbiome, endocrine system, genetics and gender may play in autoimmune diseases that disproportionately affect younger people and women," Noble added.

Cedars-Sinai and the Kao family share a common goal of identifying personalized treatments for patients with autoimmune diseases, moving beyond a one-size-fits-all treatment approach.

"We are committed to scholarly discovery of how best to distinguish autoimmune disease subtypes and to use personalized genetic and clinical information to develop safe, targeted therapies for individual patients that lead to improved health outcomes," said Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the Medical Faculty at Cedars-Sinai.

"This important gift by the Kao family recognizes the work of our talented investigators and medical staff and their dedication to tackling the most challenging diseases," Melmed added. "We have a great deal of work ahead of us. The Kao family's support and partnership are invaluable in that quest."

 

Hanukkah Candlelighting Ceremony Set for Dec. 23

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Cedars-Sinai will host its annual public Hanukkah candlelighting ceremony on Monday, Dec. 23, at 5 p.m. in the Plaza Lobby. 

Staff and family members are invited to the ceremony, led by Rabbi Jason Weiner, senior rabbi and director of the Spiritual Care Department. Weiner will light a 4-foot metal menorah that was built and donated by a grateful former patient several years ago. The event also will feature live music, food and prizes.

Candlelighting for each night of the holiday, which runs Dec. 22-29, will be broadcast in patient rooms on Channel 50. It will air at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 22-29. Candlelighting will be shown on Channel 50 at 4 p.m. on Dec. 27, and at 6 p.m. on Dec. 28.

 

Training for Incident Reporting System to Begin

Cedars-Sinai will roll out a new incident reporting system, CS-Safe, on Tuesday, Jan. 21. The new system is designed to more effectively document near misses, good catches and safety events that affect patients, staff and visitors.

All staff at the medical center and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, both clinical and nonclinical, are encouraged to use the CS-Safe platform.

"To enhance the culture of safety, we are asking all staff to document any event or unsafe condition that could affect patients, staff and visitors," said Edward Seferian, MD, chief patient safety officer. "Training on the new system is the first, important step to promoting a positive and engaged safety culture."

Training will begin in early January when staff and physicians will have access to a short, six-minute training module in HealthStream.

An additional one-hour training will be provided from Jan. 6-17 for leadership staff who review reported events.

The CS-Safe system has an intuitive user interface that will make it easier to report incidents and allow for faster entry. In addition, CS-Safe is designed to better track adverse events throughout the medical center and to provide feedback to operational and nursing leadership—as well as to the staff member who submitted the initial incident report.

Unlike the current systems used at the medical center and within the medical network, CS-Safe will provide status updates, allowing staff to better monitor their entry and be informed of its follow-up.

For questions about training, staff are encouraged to speak with their manager, or search for CS-Safe in HealthStream in early January.

 

 

Recognition for High Rate of Flu Vaccinations

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health recognized Cedars-Sinai and two of its affiliated hospitals for vaccinating 90% or more of its employees during the 2018-19 influenza season.

Cedars-Sinai, Torrance Memorial Medical Center and Cedars-Sinai Marina del Rey Hospital were three of only 23 hospitals in the county to achieve this goal.

At Cedars-Sinai, including the Medical Network, 17,656 employees were vaccinated, representing a compliance rate of 97.99%. Marina del Rey Hospital employees reported a rate of 95%, an improvement of 3% over last year.

"It's a tremendous honor to have our collective efforts recognized for a second year in a row," said Cindy Chavira, executive director of the Department of Medicine and Women's Services, who accepted the award on behalf of Cedars-Sinai at a ceremony on Dec. 9. "We work diligently throughout the year to ensure our process is smooth for staff, faculty and contractors to obtain the highest levels of compliance. I'm proud to say that every year we have increased our compliance rates."

During the 2018-19 flu season, roughly 65 other county hospitals did not meet the 90% flu vaccination goal for healthcare workers set by a national program called Healthy People 2020, which seeks to increase immunization rates and reduce preventable infectious diseases.

"By requiring the influenza vaccine for all of our staff and healthcare providers, we send a message that influenza is dangerous," said Jonathan Grein, MD, director of Hospital Epidemiology. "It also highlights our commitment to do everything we can to protect not just our patients, but our healthcare providers, staff and the community."

 

Ray Charles Foundation Establishes Scholarship

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Ray Charles Foundation President Valerie Ervin with a photo of the music legend at the foundation headquarters in Los Angeles.

The Ray Charles Foundation has made an investment in the future, donating $1 million to fund a new neurosurgery scholarship program at Cedars-Sinai.

Under the direction of Keith L. Black, MD, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, scholarship recipients will receive personalized, mentored research training from Cedars-Sinai's neurosciences faculty while conducting their own research projects.

The scholarship program will accept one or two MD or PhD students to participate in the program every year. The scholars then will be matched with a principal investigator who will provide mentorship, guidance and career-development advice. Scholars also will be able to access the day-to-day resources and training that they need as they carry out their research projects.

"The knowledge and insight these scholars will gain through this experience will help prepare them to serve as the healers, scientists and thought leaders of tomorrow," Black said.

The Ray Charles Foundation Scholars Fund in Neurosurgery aims to promote representation and enhance diversity in the neurosciences by supporting the training of students who come from underrepresented backgrounds, with a focus on historically black colleges and universities.

Valerie Ervin, president of The Ray Charles Foundation, says that the goal is to create a training pipeline that helps shape the careers of future leaders in the field of neuroscience.

"It is an honor, on behalf of The Ray Charles Foundation and its board of directors, to partner with Cedars-Sinai and Dr. Black in shaping the future for the next generation in science and medicine through The Ray Charles Foundation Scholars Fund in Neurosurgery," Ervin said. "The mentorship and teaching in this program in the name of Ray Charles are immeasurable and will set the tone for the next generation of doctors."

Legendary singer and songwriter Ray Charles (1930–2004) gave a gift to Cedars-Sinai about 15 years ago to name the Ray Charles Cafeteria and Conference Center to convey his appreciation for the care he received at the medical center. Founded in 1986, The Ray Charles Foundation continues in the legacy of its founder by supporting philanthropic programs in music, education and healthcare.

 

Stem Cells Don't Take a Day Off During the Holidays

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Biomedical technician Louis Pinedo feeds stem cells their special diet.

While most of us were stuffing ourselves with turkey and pumpkin pie at home on Thanksgiving Day, the staff members at one Cedars-Sinai laboratory were on the job, feeding stem cells.

"Stem cells do not observe national holidays," says Loren Ornelas-Menendez, the manager of a lab that converts samples of adult skin and blood cells into stem cells—the amazing "factories" our bodies use to make our cells. These special cells help medical scientists learn how diseases develop and how they might be cured.

Stem cells are living creatures that must be hand-fed a special formula each day, monitored for defects and maintained at just the right temperature. And that means the cell lab is staffed every day, 52 weeks a year.

These cells are so needy that Ornelas-Menendez jokes: "Many people have dogs. We have stem cells."

Millions of living stem cells are stored in the David and Janet Polak Foundation Stem Cell Core Laboratory at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute. Derived from hundreds of healthy donors and patients, they represent a catalogue of human ills, including diabetes, breast cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Crohn's disease.

Cedars-Sinai scientists rely on stem cells for many tasks: to make important discoveries about how our brains develop; to grow tiny versions of human tissues for research; and to create experimental treatments for blindness and neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that they are testing in clinical trials.

The lab's main collection consists of induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, which mimic the all-powerful stem cells we all had as embryos. These ingenious cells, which Cedars-Sinai scientists genetically engineer from adult cells, can make any type of cell in the body—each one matching the DNA of the donor. Other types of stem cells in the lab make only one or two kinds of cells, such as brain or intestinal cells.

Handy and versatile as they are, stem cells are high-maintenance. A few types, such as those that make connective tissue cells for wound healing, can be fed as infrequently as every few days. But iPSCs require a daily meal to stay alive, plus daily culling to weed out cells that have started to turn into cells of the gut, brain, breast or other unwanted tissues.

So each day, lab staff suit up and remove trays of stem cells from incubators that are set at a cozy 98.6 degrees. Peering through microscopes, they carefully remove the "bad" cells to ensure the purity of the iPSCs they will provide to researchers at Cedars-Sinai and around the world.

While the cells get sorted, a special feeding formula is defrosting in a dozen bottles spread around a lab bench. The formula incudes sodium, glucose, vitamins and proteins. Using pipettes, employees squeeze the liquid into food wells inside little compartments that contain the iPSCs. Afterward, they return the cells to their incubators.

The lab's 10 employees are on a rotating schedule that ensures the lab is staffed on weekends and holidays, not just weekdays. On Thanksgiving Day, biomedical technician Louis Pinedo made a 100-mile round trip from his home in Oxnard, California, and spent several hours at work, filling nearly 600 feeding wells. On both Christmas and New Year's Day, two employees are expected to staff the lab.

All this ceaseless effort helps make Cedars-Sinai one of the world's top providers of iPSCs, renowned for consistency and quality. Among the lab's many clients are major universities and the global Answer ALS project, which is using the cells in its search for a cure for this devastating disease.

That's why the lab's director, Dhruv Sareen, PhD, suggests that at your next holiday feast, why not lift a glass to these hardworking lab employees?

"One day the cells they tend could lead to treatments for diseases that have plagued humankind for centuries," he says. "And that's something to be truly thankful for."

 

Circle of Friends Honorees for November

The Circle of Friends program honored 195 people in November. 

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgment.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Rachel Abuav, MD

Sonu S. Ahluwalia, MD

Robert A. Arbuckle, MD

Joel A. Aronowitz, MD

Arash Asher, MD

Laura G. Audell, MD, MS

David A. Austin, MD

Walid S. Ayoub, MD

Babak Azarbal, MD

Eli M. Baron, MD

Satinder J. Bhatia, MD

David S. Boyer, MD

Todd V. Brennan, MD

Earl W. Brien, MD

Wendy Briggs

Philip G. Brooks, MD

Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD

Miguel A. Burch, MD

Jeffrey F. Caren, MD, FACC

Graciela Carrillo

Stephen M. Chan, MD

Dorrie E. Chang, MD

Cheryl G. Charles, MD

George E. Chaux, MD, FCCP

Derek Cheng, MD

William W. Chow, MD

Alice P. Chung, MD, FACS

Hart C. Cohen, MD

Stephen T. Copen, MD

Stephen R. Corday, MD

Alice C. Cruz, MD

Novalyn G. Cruz

Xiaojiang Cui, PhD

Timothy J. Daskivich, MD

Eleanor De Guzman

Robert W. Decker, MD

Stephen C. Deutsch, MD, FACP

Seper Dezfoli, MD

Noam Z. Drazin, MD

Cheryl L. Dunnett, MD

Ashkan Ehdaie, MD

Yaron Elad, MD

Jonathan C. Ellis, MD

Ashlee M. Enriquez, CP

Fardad Esmailian, MD

Jeremy A. Falk, MD

Mark B. Faries, MD

Edward J. Feldman, MD

David E. Fermelia, MD

James S. Fishkin, MD

Christopher R. Fitzgerald, MD

Charles A. Forscher, MD

Steven D. Frankel, MD

Stephen J. Freedland, MD

Larry Froch, MD

Ivor L. Geft, MD

Sara Ghandehari, MD

Benjamin N. Gilmore, MD

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Richard N. Gold, MD

Neil J. Goldberg, MD

Leah P. Goldblatt, CN II

Christina Y. Ha, MD

Jennette F. Hackett, CN II

Antoine Hage, MD

Robert Haile, PhD, MPH

David S. Hallegua, MD, FACR

Omid Hamid, MD

Michele A. Hamilton, MD

Kristin A. Harris, PA-C

Michael D. Harris, MD

Allen S. Ho, MD

David M. Hoffman, MD

Erica Horn

Jethro L. Hu, MD

Stanley C. Jordan, MD

Marwa Kaisey, MD

Beth Y. Karlan, MD

Scott R. Karlan, MD

Joseph Katigbak

David Y. Kawashiri, MD

Walter F. Kerwin, MD

Raj M. Khandwalla, MD

Melvin Khaw, MD

Chae Y. Kim, MD

David S. Kim, MD, PhD

Terrence T. Kim, MD

Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Jon A. Kobashigawa, MD

Michael A. Kropf, MD

Ronald S. Kvitne, MD

Lia B. Labrant, MD

Gary E. Leach, MD

Caroline Lee, MD

Mary E. Leier, NP

Norman E. Lepor, MD, FACC, FAHA, FSCAI

Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN

Michael S. Levine, MD

Andrew J. Li, MD

Daniel J. Lieber, MD

Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP

Shelly C. Lu, MD

Cheryle C. Maano Requejo, RN, BSN, OCN

Susan MacGregor Huser

David P. Magner, MD, FACS

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Adam N. Mamelak, MD, FACS

Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)

M. Marcel Maya, MD

Allison M. Mays, MD

Philomena F. McAndrew, MD

Heather L. McArthur, MD, MPH

Bin McLaurin

Bruce B. McLucas, MD

Dominick J. Megna, MD

Megan M. Mier, PA-C

Gopika D. Miller, MD

Amin J. Mirhadi, MD

Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc

Charles N. Moon, MD

Reiad Y. Najjar, MD

Mamoo Nakamura, MD

Shawn S. Nasseri, MD

Youram Nassir, MD

Leslie Navarro

Reza Nazemi, MD

Anita N. Newman, MD, FACS

Christopher S. Ng, MD

James B. Nguyen, MD

Nicholas N. Nissen, MD

Mark S. Noah, MD

Paul W. Noble, MD

Donald F. Nortman, MD, FACP

Mazen Noureddin, MD

McKenzie O'Neal, CN II

Christopher P. Owens

Randy Palacios

Kenneth H. Park, MD

Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD

Chirag G. Patil, MD

Rachel C. Pearl, MD

Brad L. Penenberg, MD

Florian Rader, MD, M.Sc.

Danny Ramzy, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FACC

Carlos A. Razon

Naomi R. Reale, CN II

Bobbie J. Rimel, MD

Astrid S. Rios, RN

Sepehr Rokhsar, MD

Robert M. Rose, MD

Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD

Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD

Amy S. Rutman, MD

Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS

Gregory P. Sarna, MD

Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC

Kevin S. Scher, MD, MBA

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Prediman K. Shah, MD

Omid A. Shaye, MD

Michael M. Shehata, MD

Laticia M. Shelton

Randolph Sherman, MD

Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, FAAN

Robert J. Siegel, MD

Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS

Julia Sladek, MD

Jon Mallen St. Clair, MD, PhD

Jasminka Stegic, MS, ANP-BC, CCRN

Carey B. Strom, MD

Nicholas R. Szumski, MD

Jason Tapia, CN

David B. Thordarson, MD

John V. Tiberi, MD

Tommy H. Tomizawa, MD, MPH

Rose O. Tompkins, MD

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Leo Treyzon, MD, MS

Eugene Y. Tsai, MD

Jonathan T. Turriago, DO

Mike A. Uyeki, MD

Robert A. Vescio, MD

Linda Vuu, MD

Evan S. Walgama, MD

Marleen J. Williams, RN

Robert N. Wolfe, MD, FCCP

Edward M. Wolin, MD

Paola Wong

Arthur W. Wu, MD

Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC

Tamer B. Younan, DPM

Arthur M. Zapata, RN

Raymond Zimmer, MD

CS-Link Tip: Patient Reminder Lists

You may have wanted to follow up on certain tasks with patients at some point. Patient Reminder Lists in CS-Link™ is one way to keep track of patient-related tasks, even if they may not be related to a specific visit or admission.

A Patient Reminder List can hold a list of patients that you may want to keep track of for research or educational purposes. They can also contain a list of patients with specific follow-up tasks with due dates, such as reminders for future lab tests or visits.

To create a Patient Reminder List, click on the wrench icon labeled "Edit List" located on the left-hand side of the Patient Lists toolbar. Choose "Create Reminder List" from the pull-down menu. In the pop-up window, name your reminder list and add your desired columns as you would for a My List.

Once a list is created you can add patients by clicking on the Add Patient button on the toolbar or by simply right clicking on one or a selection of patients from a user or system list and choosing Add to Reminder List from the context menu. You can then choose the Reminder List you want to assign the patient to and fill out the task-related information.

If you assign a due date, you will receive an In Basket message on that date if the task is still outstanding. You can complete tasks by first selecting the patient in the Reminder List and clicking on the task in the report that appears on the bottom of the screen.

For more information, please see the CS-Link job-aid on this topic by clicking here.

If you have questions, feel free to contact us at groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.