Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

Physician Wellness Tip: Take the Stairs

In response to excellent feedback to the recent Physician Wellness survey, we are launching a new regular feature for Pulse where a tip, video, story or discount will be highlighted to support physician wellness. This week's tip is to take the stairs.

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Physicians Come Together to Improve Patient Care

In support of Cedars-Sinai’s new flow initiative, led by Jeff Smith, MD, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, on Feb. 26 Clement C. Yang, MD, chief of staff, and Bradley Rosen, MD, vice president for Physician Alignment, convened a special engagement with some of the highest volume medicine attendings at Cedars-Sinai to participate in a data-driven discussion. This group, named the "Physician Best Practice Team", is comprised of more than 40 physicians, and includes the highest volume internists in private practice at Cedars-Sinai, representatives from the four major hospitalist groups (ISP, Genesis, Platinum and the GIM faculty), and internal medicine residents.

» Read more

Bed Huddles Unite Staff to Improve Patient Flow

A new initiative is bringing staff from across Cedars-Sinai medical center together daily, in support of organization-wide efforts to proactively manage capacity and patient flow. Daily bed huddles are being held at 9 a.m. in North Tower Conference Room B. The 15- to 20-minute huddles, which began in December, allow operational leaders to discuss census, capacity and the projected flow of patients in and out of inpatient beds.

» Read more

Susan Cheng, MD, Named Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health

Susan Cheng, MD, MPH, MMsc, one of the nation's leading cardiologists specializing in population health sciences, has been named the Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health and Population Science. Cheng, who joined the Smidt Heart Institute in 2018 as director of Cardiovascular Population Sciences in the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center and director of Public Health Research, is a cardiologist, echocardiographer and clinician-scientist who leads research programs aimed at uncovering the drivers of cardiovascular aging in women and men.

» Read more

Comprehensive Stroke Center Receives Recertification

The Comprehensive Stroke Center received its third Comprehensive Stroke Recertification by the Joint Commission. The certification is the most demanding certification and designed for hospitals that have specific abilities to receive and treat the most complex stroke cases.

» Read more

Kimchi, MD, Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Internationally-acclaimed cardiologist Asher Kimchi, MD, co-medical director of the Preventive and Consultative Heart Center of Excellence at the Smidt Heart Institute and professor of Medicine, received the prestigious 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award in Cardiovascular Science, Medicine and Surgery from the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences (IACS). The award, which was presented during the IACS’ recent international conference in Bangalore, India, recognized Kimchi’s longstanding leadership in heart-disease education and treatment initiatives.

» Read more

Appointment of New Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Executive

David Marshall co

Cedars-Sinai has announced the appointment of David R. Marshall, JD, DNP, RN, CENP, NEA-BC, NHDP-BC as senior vice president and chief nursing executive at Cedars-Sinai. Marshall brings more than three decades of nursing leadership experience, a track record of organizational achievement and a genuine dedication to compassionate care.

» Read more

Joint Venture for Cedars-Sinai and Providence St. Joseph

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

Building on our mission to expand access to high-quality care, I am delighted to announce that Cedars-Sinai and Providence St. Joseph Health have agreed to create a joint venture in the San Fernando Valley. The joint venture will own and operate Providence Tarzana Medical Center, whose new name will be Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center.

» Read more

Clinical Guidelines for Patient Surgery Updated

In its ongoing effort to provide high-value care, Cedars-Sinai has significantly updated its clinical guidelines for patient testing before surgical procedures. The new policy, which will impact thousands of procedures performed each year throughout the health system, aims to eliminate unnecessary care that exposes a patient to needless risk or wastes time and money.

» Read more

Making Waves in Science: Jennifer Van Eyk

In honor of National Women's History Month in March, The Bridge is celebrating Cedars-Sinai's talented female leaders with a Q&A series, "Making Waves in Science." This week's interview is with Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD, professor of Medicine, who directs the Advanced Clinical Biosystems Research Institute, the Precision Biomarker Laboratory and basic research at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center. She also co-directs Cedars-Sinai Precision Health.

» Read more

Prepare for LA Marathon Street Closures March 24

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 24, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai. Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by early afternoon.

» Read more

Liver Transplant Patient Says Thank You

For years, Bradley Ross knew he would need a liver transplant. But seemingly out of nowhere, his health declined rapidly, and he was admitted to Cedars-Sinai where he remained until a donor became available. Through the biggest struggle of his life, Ross reflects on the kindness he received each day from his care team and how those positive attitudes helped keep his spirits bright. Watch Bradley's journey here.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

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The Circle of Friends program honored 95 people in February. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Medication Links

Medication reconciliation is crucial for patient safety. All of us should review the medication list and make appropriate corrections. With My CS-Link™, the patient sees the list, and inaccurate or outdated information can be confusing or scary. So, once you have reviewed and updated the list, it's time to get the list to display appropriately in your note.

» Read more

Physician Wellness Tip: Take the Stairs

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Taking the stairs is good exercise and an easy exercise option at the medical center.

When you can, taking the stairs is a great choice.

It gets your blood pumping and your muscles working at the same time. These bursts of energy can burn calories and stairs are everywhere.

Next time skip the elevator and you might find it’s faster when in a hurry. Check out the stairs in the main medical center and be inspired by the quotes and handpainted murals

Physicians Come Together to Improve Patient Care

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Brad Rosen, MD, (center, standing) discusses efforts to support Cedar-Sinai's new flow initiative.

In support of Cedars-Sinai’s new flow initiative, led by Jeff Smith, MD, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, on Feb. 26 Clement C. Yang, MD, chief of staff, and Bradley Rosen, MD, vice president for Physician Alignment, convened a special engagement with some of the highest volume medicine attendings at Cedars-Sinai to participate in a data-driven discussion.

This group, named the "Physician Best Practice Team", is comprised of more than 40 physicians, and includes the highest volume internists in private practice at Cedars-Sinai, representatives from the four major hospitalist groups (ISP, Genesis, Platinum and the GIM faculty), and internal medicine residents.

Two important questions were introduced to the physicians during the Feb. 26 gathering:

1. When it comes to moving discharges to earlier in the day, how might we achieve this?
2. What can Cedars-Sinai do to support you in achieving these efforts?

The meeting generated plenty of insight, feedback and sharing. There is already work underway to implement changes based on the robust discussion.

These providers will continue to meet on a regular basis to explore best practices that will improve patient care, including discussion topics on flow, communication, clinical efficiency and affordability.

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Bed Huddles Unite Staff to Improve Patient Flow

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Jeff Smith, MD, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, meets with representatives from departments across the medical center to talk about patient flow during a daily bed-huddle discussion.

A new initiative is bringing staff from across Cedars-Sinai medical center together daily, in support of organization-wide efforts to proactively manage capacity and patient flow.

Daily bed huddles are being held at 9 a.m. in North Tower Conference Room B. The 15- to 20-minute huddles, which began in December, allow operational leaders to discuss census, capacity and the projected flow of patients in and out of inpatient beds. The discussions help guide decisions around optimization and mobilization of resources and help move inpatients safely and effectively through the care process.

"Our census remains high, and on one hand this demand speaks to the outstanding quality of care we provide," said Jeff Smith, MD, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer. "But if operating at capacity forces us to divert ambulances or extend wait times, we're not fulfilling our mission to serve the community. Patient flow is a challenge belonging to all of us, and each bed huddle provides us with an opportunity to strengthen our situational awareness and decisionmaking as a team."

During each huddle, representatives from departments across the medical center work together to tackle discharge-planning obstacles—such as pending tests, lab results and discharge orders—in order to move patients to their next point of care and free up beds. The departments represented include Medicine, Perioperative Services, Nursing, Pharmacy, Case Management, Central Transportation Services, Environmental Services, Laboratory, Imaging, Acute Therapy, Pharmacy, Procedure Center and Noninvasive Cardiology, among others.

To support the initiative, physicians are asked to ensure discharge orders are written by 9 a.m. so patients who can be discharged safely are processed by 11 a.m. Incoming patients from the Emergency Department (ED) and post-anesthesia care units tend to increase around this time. Increased discharges before 11 a.m. also have been linked to a reduction in ambulance diversions and the number of patients leaving the ED without being seen, said Heidi High, associate director of Patient Placement.

"The idea is to get the operational leaders in the same place," said High. "You bring up your barrier, you've got the people in the room, you connect them, and by the time we leave, we have a plan on how to resolve that barrier."

After the huddles, staff monitor progress throughout the day, and if the medical center meets certain capacity triggers, an additional huddle is held at 2 p.m. to address issues.

Bed huddles are just one part of the organization's ongoing efforts to increase patient flow.

The huddles work in conjunction with daily unit-based Progression of Care Rounds (POCR), where staff discuss their patients' care and discharge planning. Both initiatives aim to improve flow, patient experience, patient safety and financial stewardship by promoting a proactive approach to capacity management and decisionmaking.

Additionally, a Departure Lounge, open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in Cafeteria Conference Room A, offers a comfortable area with refreshments and entertainment to eligible patients who are unable to go home within two hours of discharge. This provides them with a place to rest as they wait, and allows the medical center to create capacity for patients waiting in the Emergency Department for a bed.

Susan Cheng, MD, Named Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health

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Susan Cheng, MD

Susan Cheng, MD, MPH, MMsc, one of the nation's leading cardiologists specializing in population health sciences, has been named the Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health and Population Science.

Cheng, who joined the Smidt Heart Institute in 2018 as director of Cardiovascular Population Sciences in the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center and director of Public Health Research, is a cardiologist, echocardiographer and clinician-scientist who leads research programs aimed at uncovering the drivers of cardiovascular aging in women and men.

"This endowment is an incredible honor and privilege," said Cheng, who came to Cedars-Sinai from Harvard Medical School, where she was assistant professor of Medicine. She also served as an associate physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, as well as associate director of its Cardiac Imaging Core Laboratory. "This recognition represents Cedars-Sinai's exceptionally strong commitment to advancing precision medicine in ways that are meaningful to both patients in the clinic and to public health."

Cheng's work is focused on unraveling how and why women and men experience the aging process differently, and how this leads to different types of heart disease as well as diseases affecting other organ systems. Cheng also works on pinpointing predictors of healthy aging that may be specific to women or men by analyzing large volumes of population data, with the goal of developing rigorous, data-driven approaches to maintaining health over the course of life.

"We need to better understand why we see persistent population level differences between women and men in heart health as well as overall health over the lifespan," said C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center. "Dr. Cheng's research will help us develop new strategies for improving long-term health and outcomes for both women and men worldwide."

Cheng has served on the editorial boards of major cardiovascular and imaging journals as well as on leadership committees for the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology. She has chaired and contributed to American Heart Association scientific statements on research methods, heart disease statistics and the cardiovascular care of older adults. She has authored over 170 publications, and her work has been recognized with multiple awards and supported by continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Endowed chairs enable Cedars-Sinai to attract and retain highly distinguished scholar-researcher-physicians. Since the first in 1983, 70 chairs have been established at Cedars-Sinai, generating continuing resources to support research and teaching efforts.

Comprehensive Stroke Center Receives Recertification

The Comprehensive Stroke Center received its third Comprehensive Stroke Recertification on Friday, March 1, by the Joint Commission.

The certification is the most demanding certification and designed for hospitals that have specific abilities to receive and treat the most complex stroke cases. This is the highest level of stroke certification available.

"The stroke team feels we have a responsibility to the community we serve," said Laurie Paletz, BSN, PHN, RN-BC SCRN, the stroke program manager in the Department of Neurology. "We take that responsibility very seriously."

The survey took place over two days and included two surveyors. At the completion of the rigorous survey, the surveyors shared they were extremely impressed with the level of expertise, the high-level patient care delivered and the passion and commitment of the multi-disciplinary team.

In the closing conference, the surveyors said in reviewing 150 other programs,  Cedars-Sinai was by far the best stroke program they had seen. In the surveyor's words, "this is how it's supposed to be done."

"Congratulations to everyone involved in the successful survey," added Paletz.

Kimchi, MD, Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

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Asher Kimchi, MD, co-medical director of the Preventive and Consultative Heart Center of Excellence at the Smidt Heart Institute (center), (center) receives the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award in Cardiovascular Science, Medicine and Surgery from the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences (IACS). The award was presented by Chandrasekharan Kartha, MD, IACS executive council member, and Naranjan S. Dhalla, MD, PhD, IACS executive director.

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Kimchi addresses members of the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences.

Internationally-acclaimed cardiologist Asher Kimchi, MD, co-medical director of the Preventive and Consultative Heart Center of Excellence at the Smidt Heart Institute and professor of Medicine, received the prestigious 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award in Cardiovascular Science, Medicine and Surgery from the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences (IACS).

The award, which was presented during the IACS’ recent international conference in Bangalore, India, recognized Kimchi’s longstanding leadership in heart-disease education and treatment initiatives.

In accepting the award, Kimchi said, "I am humbled by and deeply appreciative of this honor, particularly since this audience is filled with highly accomplished cardiologists, surgeons, scientists, cardiovascular academics and other outstanding healthcare professionals."

Kimchi also acknowledged Cedars-Sinai leadership. "At moments like this, I am reminded how lucky I am to have spent the past 37 years at Cedars-Sinai. I attribute receipt of this award to the nurturing and encouraging academic environment at Cedars-Sinai." Adding, "This would not have happened without your help and support."

Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president of Academic Affairs and dean of the medical faculty, applauded Kimchi. "Congratulations on this well-deserved peer recognition. It is a testament to your professional achievements and to the high esteem in which you are held by colleagues throughout the world. Cedars-Sinai is so proud to have you as a leader for our heart patients."

A former flight surgeon in the Israeli Air Force, Kimchi is the founder and chair of the International Academy of Cardiology and the World Congress on Heart Disease and past president of the American Heart Association’s Los Angeles County Division. Committed to sharing advances in cardiology, Kimchi has directed more than 25 international heart disease congresses.

Kimchi’s research on the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease and heart failure have been published in prestigious, peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Circulation and the Journal of the American Medical Association. Kimchi is an editor or co-editor of 12 books and serves on the editorial board of the journal Cardiology.

Appointment of New Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Executive

By Jeff Smith, MD, JD, MMM, Executive Vice President, Hospital Operations, and Chief Operating Officer, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

David Marshall

David R. Marshall, JD, DNP, RN, CENP, NEA-BC, NHDP-BC

I am delighted to announce the appointment of David R. Marshall, JD, DNP, RN, CENP, NEA-BC, NHDP-BC as senior vice president and chief nursing executive at Cedars-Sinai. Dr. Marshall brings more than three decades of nursing leadership experience, a track record of organizational achievement and a genuine dedication to compassionate care.

Dr. Marshall currently serves as system chief nursing and patient care services executive for the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, also known as UTMB Health. He began his nursing career at UTMB Health as a staff nurse in 1983 before advancing to assistant head nurse, nurse manager, nursing supervisor, nurse administrator and director of Nursing. In 2001, he assumed the role of chief nursing and patient care services officer.

During 36 years with UTMB Health, Dr. Marshall made major contributions to the academic health sciences center. He was part of the leadership team that led UTMB Health back from Hurricane Ike after it devastated the Gulf Coast in 2008. In the hurricane's aftermath, Dr. Marshall served as an important public face and voice of confidence for the hospital, keeping patients and the community informed about progress to restore services. And he led the effort for UTMB Health to regain Magnet® recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center in 2012, an achievement that has been sustained since that time.

Those who have worked with Dr. Marshall know that, above all, he is dedicated to his profession. He leads with a deep sense of caring and a strong desire to support nurses in their daily work. He has brought that commitment and passion to leadership posts with numerous professional organizations at the local, state and national levels, including the Committee on Practice Issues for the Texas Nurses Association and the American Nurses Association Congress on Nursing Practice and Economics.

In 2017 he was appointed to a four-year term on the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Magnet® Recognition Program. He also has served on the board of directors of the American Organization of Nurse Executives and in January began a three-year term as treasurer. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

In addition to bachelor's and master's degrees in nursing, Dr. Marshall earned his doctor of nursing practice degree from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Nursing. He also holds a law degree from South Texas College of Law Houston.

Dr. Marshall joins Cedars-Sinai on June 3. He succeeds Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, who is transitioning into the new role of chief health equity officer. Dr. Burnes Bolton, health system chief nursing executive, senior vice president for Nursing and chief nursing officer, has provided extraordinary service and leadership during 48 years with Cedars-Sinai. In recognition of her contributions, she was awarded in 2016 the inaugural James R. Klinenberg, MD, and Lynn Klinenberg Linkin Chair in Nursing, the organization’s first endowed chair in nursing.

Joint Venture for Cedars-Sinai and Providence St. Joseph

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

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Thomas M. Priselac

Building on our mission to expand access to high-quality care, I am delighted to announce that Cedars-Sinai and Providence St. Joseph Health have agreed to create a joint venture in the San Fernando Valley.

The joint venture will own and operate Providence Tarzana Medical Center, whose new name will be Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center.

This undertaking will further extend our commitment to serve patients throughout the region by augmenting other healthcare options we already provide in Marina del Rey, Playa Vista, Culver City, Santa Monica, the South Bay—through the affiliation with Torrance Memorial Medical Center—and other communities. It brings together two mission-driven organizations whose expertise will create a medical destination offering exceptional healthcare to residents of the Tarzana area.

The joint venture has been approved by each institution’s board of directors. Soon, it will be submitted to the state attorney general for review.

The organizations will continue to build out the Tarzana medical campus with a new state-of-the-art patient-care tower already under development on the site. Many healthcare specialties will be expanded through the new partnership, including heart and cancer programs as well as women’s health services.

Through the joint venture, Providence and Cedars-Sinai will continue to operate as separate, independent healthcare organizations. Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center will maintain its Catholic identity while embracing the diversity of all faiths.

We look forward to working closely with our partners at Providence. I am including a copy of the news release that Cedars-Sinai and Providence are issuing today.

Thank you for your continued commitment and dedication to our mission.

Clinical Guidelines for Patient Surgery Updated

In its ongoing effort to provide high-value care, Cedars-Sinai has significantly updated its clinical guidelines for patient testing before surgical procedures.

The new policy, which will impact thousands of procedures performed each year throughout the health system, aims to eliminate unnecessary care that exposes a patient to needless risk or wastes time and money.

Under the new guidelines, healthy patients undergoing low-risk procedures should avoid undergoing unnecessary testing. For example, the latest medical evidence shows that previously routine preoperative chest X-rays are unlikely to change treatment plans for patients who have no symptoms or history of heart or lung disease. Therefore, if an otherwise healthy patient is getting a hip replacement, the patient should no longer receive a chest X-ray to be cleared for surgery. This simple change will reduce radiation exposure to patients, save time and reduce unnecessary costs.

The updated guidelines were overseen by the Ambulatory High-Value Care Committee. This diverse group of physicians and executive leaders promotes the practice of evidence-based medicine by translating guidelines from professional medical societies and Choosing Wisely into everyday practice.

"This is a very significant update," said urologist Karyn Eilber, MD, co-chair of the Ambulatory High-Value Care Committee and co-leader of the pre-op guidelines project. "We worked closely with key clinicians in multiple departments to ensure that changes to these guidelines were based on current professional society recommendations and driven by the people it affects."

Some physicians continue ordering unnecessary tests out of an abundance of caution, or just plain habit.

"Change is really hard," said orthopaedic surgeon Robert Klapper, MD.

He worked with the committee on another high-value care initiative—reducing unnecessary pre-op tests that check a patient’s blood type in case they need a blood transfusion (known as a "type and screen"). Klapper explained that when he became an orthopaedic surgeon 30 years ago, joint replacement surgeries were very different.

"We were working with the surgical equivalents of rotary phones compared to today’s iPhones," he said. "When I started in 1989, we made big incisions, cut through muscle and put everyone to sleep. Surgery took a significant amount of time and there was blood loss."

Flash forward to today, and a hip or knee replacement looks totally different. Patients get lighter sedation, a drug helps reduce bleeding and the risk of blood clots, incisions are smaller and there's no need to cut through muscle.

Now that low-risk joint replacement patients normally lose less blood, blood type testing that was once routine is no longer necessary in most patients. Medical societies have changed their guidelines to reflect this progress.

A lightbulb went off for Klapper when Eilber showed him data on how much blood type testing he'd been doing for hundreds of low-risk surgeries each year, versus the number of transfusions needed. Once he was convinced, it didn’t take too much effort to change his pre-op process.

"It was painless," Klapper said.

Making Waves in Science: Jennifer Van Eyk

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Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD

In honor of National Women's History Month in March, The Bridge is celebrating Cedars-Sinai's talented female leaders with a Q&A series, "Making Waves in Science." This week's interview is with Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD, professor of Medicine, who directs the Advanced Clinical Biosystems Research Institute, the Precision Biomarker Laboratory and basic research at the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center. She also co-directs Cedars-Sinai Precision Health.

How are you making an impact on science?

As director of the Advanced Clinical Biosystems Research Institute, I lead a team whose mission is to move our discoveries through the science pipeline and into the hands of clinicians. The Precision Biomarker Laboratory enables clinicians to use protein biomarkers we've identified to diagnose patients and predict their health outcomes. Another impact involves home-monitoring techniques we've developed. As part of ongoing studies, we're remotely monitoring heart disease patients: They mail us blood samples that we analyze to determine if their medication is working and if they may be at risk of having a heart attack or stroke. We're also remotely monitoring patients with irritable bowel syndrome to determine if they're at risk of having a flare-up. Training the next generation of scientists and clinicians to accomplish even more than we have is another contribution.

What leadership advice would you give to your younger self?

The first piece of advice would be this: If you've identified a problem, ignore everyone who says it can't be solved. The second piece of advice would be to surround yourself with smart people and nurture them to be their very best because that's how you advance science. The last piece of advice: If you've made a scientific discovery, don't keep it to yourself. Whatever it is, you should always share it with the world. In fact, that's our obligation to society for the privilege of being allowed to do this job.

Who is your favorite science heroine from history and why?

There are many women who have paved the way for me and other female scientists. Two who come immediately to mind are Catherine Clarke Fenselau, PhD, and Catherine Costello, PhD. Fenselau, who has done pioneering work in bioanalytical chemistry, was among the first mass spectrometrists named to the faculty of an American medical school—my alma mater, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Costello founded the Boston University School of Medicine Center for Biomedical Mass Spectrometry, which has become an internationally recognized research center. Both these women are not only icons in the fields of mass spectrometry and proteomics but also serve as proof that women can and should hold leadership roles in science. When I think about them and other accomplished female scientists, there are several characteristics they have in common that I find inspiring: perseverance, sheer talent, strong work ethic, innovative thinking and an unwavering belief in their mission.

Prepare for LA Marathon Street Closures March 24

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The Los Angeles Marathon on Sunday, March 24, could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 24, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

Numerous street closures will begin at 4 a.m., including some freeway ramps. For much of the day, the only ways to cross the marathon route will be on the 405, 101 or 110 freeways.

Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by early afternoon.

The course runs from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica, passing just north and west of Cedars-Sinai.

Streets and freeway ramps near the course will close from as early as 4 a.m. until the afternoon. The best access to the medical center for those coming from north of the marathon route will be from the 10 Freeway, exiting at Robertson or La Cienega boulevards.

The marathon's website includes an interactive map of street closures associated with the race.

For the latest traffic alerts and updates, tune into local news radio stations or check websites such as:

Liver Transplant Patient Says Thank You

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For years, Bradley Ross knew he would need a liver transplant. He also understood how hard it could be to find a liver donor in Los Angeles County, so he and his wife were prepared to move out of the state. But seemingly out of nowhere, his health declined rapidly and before they could make the move, Ross was admitted to Cedars-Sinai where he remained until a donor became available.

Through the biggest struggle of his life, Ross reflects on the kindness he received each day from his care team and how those positive attitudes helped keep his spirits bright. "I had one nurse at the end of her shift, she came over and held my hand and said she would go home and pray for me," recalls Ross. "It's those little, caring moments by the staff that really made a difference, that really brought back the human feeling."

Watch Bradley's journey here.

Circle of Friends Honorees for February

The Circle of Friends program honored 95 people in February. 

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgment.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Nelson D. Aguilar

Minnette E. Alexander, CP

Daniel C. Allison, MD, MBA, FACS

Cynthia Arevalo

Joan L. August

Shirin Bagheri, MD

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA

Lorelei W. Bangate, CHAA, PAR1

Philip G. Brooks, MD

Michael L. Chaikin, MD, FACC

Stephen T. Copen, MD

Alice C. Cruz, MD

Sara Dayanim, MD

Robert W. Decker, MD

Premal J. Desai, MD

Jean A. Dolaway, PT

Danielle S. Dondanville

Yaron Elad, MD

David M. Filsoof, MD

Phillip R. Fleshner, MD

Katherine J. Fogg, RN

Michelle E. Francis, RN

Srinivas Gaddam, MD

Anshul M. Gandhi, MD

Angela Garrido

Leena C. Gibson, MD

Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd

Bryna J. Harwood, MD

Andrew E. Hendifar, MD, MPH

Jeremy R. Herman, MD

Caren T. Hoffman, MD

David M. Hoffman, MD

Roman Ilyitsky

Christine M. Johnson

Felecia Johnson, CP

J. Patrick Johnson, MD

Tracy J. Johnson

Bronwen M. Jones

Kendra S. Jones

David Y. Josephson, MD

Saibal Kar, MD

Rosa B. Kassaseya, CP

Sanjay Kaul, MD

Sunah A. Kim, RN

Jodi Ladge, PA-C

Gary Leach, MD

Andrew J. Li, MD

Vivian Lin, MD

Issac D. Lindley

Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP

Dorothy H. Lowe, MD

Joanne Lutman, RN, OCN

Jonathan I. Macy, MD

Leah F. Maniquiz

Ruslan Marder, BSN

Peggy Mays

Daniella S. Menashe

Carol L. Mention

Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc

Reiad Najjar, MD

Marites M. Navarro

Chelsea B. Nelson, RN, BSN

Anita N. Newman, MD, FACS

Christopher S. Ng, MD

Katayoun Omrani, DDS

Nicole L. Orr Sweeney

Robert Pashman, MD

Isabel F. Pedraza, MD

Tiffany G. Perry, MD

Anne L. Peters, MD

Anahit Petrosyan

Rachel Pikus, CNII

Chrystal M. Reed, MD, PhD

Meredith F. Row

Jay S. Rudin, MD

Mina Sadeghi

Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC

Prediman K. Shah, MD

Randolph Sherman, MD

Robert J. Siegel, MD

Gena T. Smith, RN

Andrew I. Spitzer, MD

Theodore N. Stein, MD

Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS

Nina Tabachnikov

David B. Thordarson, MD

Rose Tompkins, MD

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Doreen C. Tustison, RN, BC

Katherine M. Veling, MS, PT, OCS

Esther L. Warwick, RN, BC, BSN

Amy S. Weinberg, MD

Christina Wheelwright, NP

Julianna Yiadom

Raymond Zimmer, MD

CS-Link Tip: Medication Links

Medication reconciliation is crucial for patient safety. All of us should review the medication list and make appropriate corrections. With My CS-Link™, the patient sees the list, and inaccurate or outdated information can be confusing or scary. So, once you have reviewed and updated the list, it's time to get the list to display appropriately in your note.

Many SmartLinks can pull the medication list into your note. If you look at your SmartPhrase, you can see that most of you use a link such as .cmeds. Some of you use .takmeds. What is the difference? Cmeds brings in all the medications listed as current, and they appear green (refreshable) in your note. Takmeds only pulls in those medications checked as currently taking. Unless you change the link to .takmedsrefreshable, .takmeds does not appear green and does not refresh when you update the list.

Contact an EIS physician at GroupEISPhysicians@cshs.org for more information or for help with the optimization and tailoring of your note template. And remember: On the second Thursday of each month, you can attend the CS-Link Efficiency and Review (CLEAR) meeting in person or via WebEx. The classes, which begin at 7:30 a.m., are held in PEC 4.