Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

President's Perspective: The Academic Mission

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

It drives the future of healthcare, not just at Cedars-Sinai, but for patients around the country and around the world. It's been a crucial element of our mission for decades and has expanded significantly over the last several years. It enables Cedars-Sinai to offer new options to patients. If you haven't guessed by now, I'm referring to Cedars-Sinai's academic mission—our commitment to research and education that improves lives.

» Read more

Parking Rate Changes Coming in November

We surveyed the current parking rates for patients, visitors, employees and faculty physicians at our lots and garages. After a thorough analysis, we will be adjusting parking rates in November for all full-time, part-time and per-diem Cedars-Sinai Medical Center employees, independent contractors and faculty physicians who pay for parking. 

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Leadership Series: Operational Efficiency

Watch the next video in a series featuring executive leaders talking about the institution's most important goals and initiatives. This week, Bryan Croft, senior vice president of Operations, talks about operational efficiency.

» Read more

Physician Flu Shot Attestations Required by Nov. 1

Physicians will receive a CS-Link inbox message on Oct. 1, 2019, requesting they verify whether they have received their flu shot, have an approved exemption or decline their vaccination. Each physician is required to attest their vaccination status by checking the appropriate box in CS-Link prior to Nov. 1, 2019.

» Read more

Chikwe Named Founding Chair of Cardiac Surgery

Joanna Chikwe has been named chair of the newly established Department of Cardiac Surgery at the Smidt Heart Institute. Chikwe's appointment recognizes her major standing as an international leader in cardiovascular surgery, with clinical expertise and major scholarly contributions in advanced heart valve repair, coronary revascularization and minimally invasive heart procedures.

» Read more

Physician Wellness Tip: Look For Whole Grain

Whole grains are a very important part of a healthy, balanced diet. Barley, quinoa, wheat berries and other whole grains are full of protein, fiber, vitamins and iron your body needs. There's also strong evidence that whole grains may lower your risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

» Read more

Departments Collaborate to Improve Turnaround Time

Claude Stang and Lynne Roy led their teams on a nearly two-year project to improve turnaround time metrics for patients in the Emergency Department waiting for imaging studies.

» Read more

Corporate Integrity Training Now Available

FY20 Corporate Integrity Compliance Training is now available on HealthStream. The training is mandatory for all staff members and must be completed by Dec. 31, 2019 (no exceptions). The training will take approximately one hour to complete and can be accessed through your "To-Do" list on HealthStream.

» Read more

Demo Day Showcases Healthcare Tech Innovations

Demo Day marks the culmination of a three-month program run by the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator to speed the development of innovative, early-stage businesses aiming to bring advances to the healthcare field. The latest Demo Day, held Thursday, Sept. 12, at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts, drew an audience of about 300 that included representatives of healthcare systems, investment firms and Cedars-Sinai leaders, to hear presentations by 11 young firms.

» Read more

FDA Warns About Drugs Aimed at Treating Breast Cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning that Ibrance (palbociclib), Kisqali (ribociclib) and Verzenio (abemaciclib) used to treat some patients with advanced breast cancers may cause rare but severe inflammation of the lungs.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

COF-co

The Circle of Friends program honored 151 people in August. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Personal Phrases

Earlier this year, you were reminded how to make SmartPhrases. SmartPhrases are the most powerful tool in CS-Link™. Many of you have asked how to find useful links to add to your personal phrases. Links pull information from other parts of the chart. Examples include @dob@ for date of birth, @fname@ for first name and @lastcr@ for the last creatinine. There are thousands of examples.

» Read more

President's Perspective: The Academic Mission

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

It drives the future of healthcare, not just at Cedars-Sinai, but for patients around the country and around the world.

It's been a crucial element of our mission for decades and has expanded significantly over the last several years.

It enables Cedars-Sinai to offer new options to patients.

If you haven't guessed by now, I'm referring to Cedars-Sinai's academic mission—our commitment to research and education that improves lives. Our extraordinary capabilities in patient care would not be possible without our academic programs, just as our academic excellence would not be possible without our patient-care expertise. Each is inextricably tied to the other.

For example, our research mission enables us currently to offer more than 500 clinical trials to patients, providing access to experimental treatments that may not be available elsewhere. Many of our past clinical trials have led to groundbreaking treatments that are now used around the world. 

And in the many laboratories located in Pavilion, the Davis Research Building and Spielberg, Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists are making key discoveries about causes and treatments for disease at the molecular and cellular levels. This laboratory research is enriched by its proximity to our clinical activities, as clinical challenges present new problems for our scientists to solve. This was a key principle in the design of Pavilion, where researchers and their laboratories are literally next to clinicians and patient-care areas.

While our research is invaluable to thousands of patients throughout Cedars-Sinai, it also benefits millions of people around the globe. Medical devices, new surgical techniques, new imaging and diagnostic tests, and new therapies developed at Cedars-Sinai are now used routinely throughout the world.

Similarly, our education programs benefit people far beyond the Southern California region. Physicians, scientists, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals who trained at Cedars-Sinai can be found at institutions of all sizes—from large hospitals to small rural clinics—in every corner of the world. They also can be found throughout Cedars-Sinai, as many of our top physicians, nurses and others started out as students here or advanced their careers through our education programs.

These programs are more important than ever, given the severe shortage nationwide of physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals to care for people in the future. In recent years, our education programs have expanded beyond the clinical sphere, as we now offer a doctorate degree in biomedical and translational sciences and master's degrees in biomedical sciences, including health delivery sciences and magnetic resonance in medicine.

While Cedars-Sinai began as a hospital in 1902 and will always be renowned for the quality of our clinical care, our academic mission is an essential component of who we are and greatly enhances our capability to serve people now, as well as for decades to come.

Parking Rate Changes Coming in November

Our organization has been working hard to identify ways in which we can operate more efficiently while upholding our mission to our patients and the community. With your help, we've implemented many strategic decisions to help us achieve our goals—decisions that allow us to continue investing in our organization, its people and resources.

Most recently, we surveyed the current parking rates for patients, visitors, employees and faculty physicians at our lots and garages. After a thorough analysis, we will be adjusting parking rates in November for all full-time, part-time and per-diem Cedars-Sinai Medical Center employees, independent contractors and faculty physicians who pay for parking.

The new rates will be as follows:

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This tiered approach to parking rates closely models our tiered approach to medical benefits and takes into consideration the range of salaries of our individual employees. For some employees, parking rates will decrease. For others, rates will increase. The new parking rates will be reflected in your Nov. 15 paycheck. Additionally, daily parking rates for our patients and visitors will change beginning Monday, Nov. 4. Information about those rate changes will be shared in the following weeks and also can be found in the FAQ below.

For more than two decades, Cedars-Sinai has maintained parking rates and subsidized much of the cost of parking for our employees and patients. Now, we are adjusting our rates to reflect current industry standards. As an example, employees at UCLA Health pay between $83 and $152 a month for parking. At Keck Medicine of USC, employees pay between $81 and $172 a month for parking.

We believe our tiered approach—again, structured like our benefits model and based on compensation—sets our rates at a reasonable cost. In most cases, our rates are still much lower than those of our healthcare counterparts. We hope you understand our need to make these adjustments. The attached FAQ provides more information about the rate changes.

Please remember that our Rideshare Program provides many great options for commuting to work, including subsidies for public transportation and rewards for alternative means of getting to work, such as bicycling or walking. For example, we are doubling our subsidy for bus and Metro passes from $50 to $100. Additionally, we are re-evaluating parking lot assignments to ensure employees are parking as close as possible to their assigned work areas. You will be notified if your lot assignment changes.

Thank you for continued dedication, understanding and support.

- Jeff Smith, MD, JD, MMM, executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and CEO, Cedars-Sinai Marina del Rey Hospital

- Andy Ortiz, senior vice president, Human Resources

Parking Employee FAQ (PDF)  

Rideshare Program (PDF)  

Cedars-Sinai Leadership Series: Operational Efficiency

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Watch the next video in a series featuring executive leaders talking about the institution's most important goals and initiatives. This week, Bryan Croft, senior vice president of Operations, talks about operational efficiency.

Physician Flu Shot Attestations Required by Nov. 1

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Physicians will receive a CS-Link inbox message on Oct. 1, 2019, requesting they verify whether they have received their flu shot, have an approved exemption or decline their vaccination.

Each physician is required to attest their vaccination status by checking the appropriate box in CS-Link prior to Nov. 1, 2019.

Please note: Physicians who decline the vaccine without an approved medical exemption or religious accommodation will not be allowed to work past Oct. 31.

 

Chikwe Named Founding Chair of Cardiac Surgery

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Joanna Chikwe is the founding chair of the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the Smidt Heart Institute.

Joanna Chikwe has been named chair of the newly established Department of Cardiac Surgery at the Smidt Heart Institute. Chikwe's appointment recognizes her major standing as an international leader in cardiovascular surgery, with clinical expertise and major scholarly contributions in advanced heart valve repair, coronary revascularization and minimally invasive heart procedures.

"Joanna Chikwe is nationally regarded as an expert in heart valve repair," said Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president and dean of the Cedars-Sinai faculty. "She is also known for her tremendous leadership and exceptional track record for building successful clinical and academic programs."

Chikwe comes to Cedars-Sinai from the Mount Sinai Health System in New York, where she was a professor in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, and where she served as the founding chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery at Mount Sinai St. Luke's. A native of England, she earned her medical degree from the University of Oxford, and completed clinical fellowships in cardiothoracic surgery in London at the Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals and in New York at Mount Sinai. Chikwe also served as the Cheng Endowed Professor of Surgery, chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery and director of the Heart Institute at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. 

At Cedars-Sinai, Chikwe will hold responsibility for leading the strategic direction of clinical, research and academic programs within the department and affiliate cardiac surgery programs, as well as expanding her clinical practice in advanced heart valve repair and minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

Alfredo Trento, MD, a longtime, beloved Cedars-Sinai cardiac surgeon and the former chief of cardiac surgery when it was a division in the Department of Surgery, will remain a part of the Smidt Heart Institute and will continue treating patients and performing surgical procedures.

"We are so fortunate that Dr. Trento will stay with the Smidt Heart Institute and continue to give our patients and our staff the benefit of his talent and experience," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, director of the Smidt Heart Institute. 

Chikwe is a leading expert in cardiovascular outcomes research. She is best-known for original contributions to the clinical evidence base for mitral and tricuspid valve repair, coronary revascularization and aortic surgery. Chikwe has published more than 120 peer‐reviewed contributions in The New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and leading specialty journals, and she currently serves on five editorial boards. She is the author of several surgical textbooks, including two editions of Cardiothoracic Surgery published by Oxford University Press.

"I am honored to help build on the truly remarkable Smidt Heart Institute accomplishments that include the leading heart transplantation, transcatheter valve and robotic cardiac surgery programs in North America, and the No. 3 ranking in the United States for Cardiology and Heart Surgery by U.S. News & World Report," Chikwe said.

In addition to the new Department of Cardiac Surgery led by Chikwe, the Smidt Heart Institute has created a new Department of Cardiology that will be led by Christine M. Albert, MD, MPH, who joins Cedars-Sinai from Harvard Medical School this fall.

"These two world-class departments will be propelled further under their new leadership," said Marban. "Our two new chairs will advance Cedars-Sinai's strong foundational legacy in cardiology and cardiac surgery."

Physician Wellness Tip: Look For Whole Grain

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Whole grains are a very important part of a healthy, balanced diet. Barley, quinoa, wheat berries and other whole grains are full of protein, fiber, vitamins and iron your body needs. There's also strong evidence that whole grains may lower your risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

The biggest challenge may be knowing what a whole grain is and where to find it. To help you do just that, the Whole Grains Council created an official packaging symbol, called the Whole Grain Stamp, to identify whole grain-rich foods where you shop.

Departments Collaborate to Improve Turnaround Time

For too long a time, the task of improving efficiencies between the Emergency Department and the Department of Imaging seemed to make little progress.

Then, in 2017, Claude Stang joined Cedars-Sinai as executive director of Emergency Services and started working with Lynne Roy, executive director of the Department of Imaging. It was a turning point.

As soon as Stang and Roy began collaborating, they quickly realized efficiencies could only happen if their respective teams took greater ownership of their own workflows. The two leaders embarked on a nearly two-year project to improve CT (computed tomography) turnaround-time metrics for patients in the Emergency Department waiting for imaging studies.

The results have been significant. In July 2017, when the project first kicked off, roughly 68% of emergency room patients received CT imaging within 120 minutes of admission, including those who required contrast. As of July 2019, 90% of CT patients not requiring contrast were scanned within 85 minutes and almost 91% of CT patients requiring contrast were scanned within 120 minutes.

"The key ingredient to these successes was our teams coming together in the spirit of collaboration," said Stang. "We challenged our teams to work differently than they had and openly discuss value-added activities, versus those of low value—all without pointing fingers or blame."

Discussions like these were led by Erica Spivack, MHA, a consultant in Performance Improvement, who facilitated many meetings between the two departments.

"The first step was getting the right people in the room, many of whom had never met each other or even been in the same room together," said Spivack. "We worked on building trust with one another, understanding we all have a common goal—to get a patient diagnosed as quickly as possible."

Once trust was built and goals were set, Spivack examined old processes and root causes with the group and discussed how to improve. Then, the teams formalized plans on how to monitor and sustain these new processes. One of the root causes affecting flow and turnaround times was an existing push culture instead of an ideal pull culture.

"A pull culture gives accountability to the resources needed to provide the service, in this case, CT," said Roy. "If successfully using a pull method, imaging will be done as soon as possible, rather than waiting for the push (from ED) to occur."

This concept, Roy said, helped change her employees' mindsets and encouraged them to take a leadership role over imaging needs within the Emergency Department.

"Imaging took ownership and they began pulling their own patients," said Spivack. "They started doing everything in their power to get patients in scanners the moment one was available, instead of waiting for someone in the Emergency Department to give the green light."

And although a pull culture was pivotal to the team's success, Spivack said the ultimate gains occurred because leadership set the tone from the start of the project.

"Lynne and Claude came together to address the real issues affecting both departments, instead of merely placing a bandage on the situation," said Spivack. "That's when turnaround times started lessening and efficiencies steadily began to improve."

 

Corporate Integrity Training Now Available

FY20 Corporate Integrity Compliance Training is now available on HealthStream. The training is mandatory for all staff members and must be completed by Dec. 31, 2019 (no exceptions). The training will take approximately one hour to complete and can be accessed through your "To-Do" list on HealthStream.

Staff members who wish to attend a live classroom session in order to complete the training will be able to register online in HealthStream. Additional session dates will be posted over the next few months.

To register online for a live session:

  • Log in to HealthStream and select "Catalog" from the main menu
  • Search for "FY20 Corporate Integrity Compliance LIVE CLASSROOM Training"
  • Select "Choose Class"

If you have questions about the Corporate Integrity Compliance training, contact Ashna Bhardwaj at ashna.bhardwaj@cshs.org or at 323-866-7867.

Demo Day Showcases Healthcare Tech Innovations

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Jodi Akin, founder and CEO of Hawthorne Effect, presents at Demo Day.

If you can imagine healthcare tech entrepreneurs promoting their firms with pitches as polished as the best of those on TV’s Shark Tank, you've got an idea of what Cedars-Sinai’s Demo Day is about.

Demo Day marks the culmination of a three-month program run by the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator to speed the development of innovative, early-stage businesses aiming to bring advances to the healthcare field.

For the founders of those enterprises, the event can open the doors to millions of dollars in funding as well as potentially major new customers. The latest Demo Day, held Thursday, Sept. 12, at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts, drew an audience of about 300 that included representatives of healthcare systems, investment firms and Cedars-Sinai leaders to hear presentations by 11 young firms.

Yet as Anne Wellington, managing director of the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator, pointed out, Demo Day and the entire Cedars-Sinai Accelerator effort aren’t only about spurring business activity.

"The potential that technology has to affect a lot of patients and to broadly improve care is really exciting,” Wellington said. “Many of the solutions that we work with through the accelerator have the potential to improve care for our patients at Cedars-Sinai, and then throughout the broader healthcare community, both in the U.S. and internationally.”

Examples of past alumni whose products are being used in pilot programs at Cedars-Sinai include Digital Medical Tech, which makes a Bluetooth-based system that helps nurses track down medical equipment, and Aiva Health, which sells electronic voice-assistant systems that work with speakers such as Amazon Echo to let patients adjust their TV sets or make specific requests to the hospital staff.

The accelerator program graduated its first class of businesses in 2016, and the group that gave their pitches on Thursday represented the fifth class.

In all, 47 companies have graduated from the accelerator program, which is housed on Beverly Boulevard across the street from the hospital. Those alumni companies have raised $200 million in investment and hired more than 375 people. What’s more, their products and services have been used by hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals worldwide.

One recent change in the accelerator program is that it has become entirely an in-house Cedars-Sinai operation. For previous classes, the Cedars-Sinai Accelerator worked with a Colorado-based firm called Techstars that focused on sifting through the flood of applicants to assemble a class.

Wellington said she typically receives about 400 applicants for the roughly 10 slots in every class. Cedars-Sinai invests $100,000 in each company, giving it a stake in the business and a chance to net an investment profit if, for example, the firms eventually are bought by a bigger healthcare concern.

To spur the companies’ development, their leaders are matched with Cedars-Sinai mentors including, doctors, nurses and administrators.

“We try to get them as many opinions as possible so that they understand the complexities of working in a hospital environment, where everything has lots of people involved in it,” Wellington said.

One firm in this year’s accelerator class, Feedtrail, which sells software for surveying patient satisfaction, already counts 43 healthcare systems in the U.S. and Europe as its clients. Still, “One thing we had not had a ton of experience with prior to this was implementing our platform across large health systems. With size comes complexity,” said Paul Jaglowski, Feedtrail’s chief executive and co-founder. So, he said, “it’s meant a lot” to have “the opportunity to really pick the leadership team’s brains here at Cedars-Sinai.”

Feedtrail’s system, which sends survey questions to patients’ smartphones or tablets with the aim of getting immediate replies that healthcare providers can act on swiftly, already is being tested in Cedars-Sinai’s Emergency Department, imaging operations and the Inpatient Specialty Program.

In the last two weeks of the accelerator program, heads of the participating firms focused intensively on perfecting their pitches for Demo Day. Melissa Morris, the founder and chief executive of Lantum, a London-based company that develops software for scheduling hospital staff, appreciated the coaching. "Our pitching has gotten way better since being here," she said.

Lantum is one of the biggest companies in the class, with 65 employees in London, but Morris said she was drawn to the accelerator program as a way to draw on Cedars-Sinai expertise while entering the U.S. market. At Demo Day, she explained how Lantum’s software can save hospitals money by making it faster and easier for doctors, nurses or other personnel to swap shifts or for mangers to adjust schedules when a staffer calls in sick.

Representatives of each business got five minutes to make a pitch. Afterward there was no Shark Tank-style interrogation or immediate deal-making, but the healthcare entrepreneurs set up shop at information tables where they could chat more casually with potential customers and investors.

“I think we made some valuable connections,” said Charles Stern, a co-founder of Parker Isaac Instruments, which makes a device to improve the evaluation of lymph nodes in patients with colorectal cancer.

Other presenters at Demo Day included:

  • AMPAworks—AMPAworks is a team of nurses, doctors, pharmacists and engineers helping to solve the problem of inefficient inventory-management in healthcare. The AMPAworks team has created a cube-like device and integrated software capable of counting inventory in real time. The system also keeps track of provider and patient inventory-utilization in order to save time and costs.
  • ClinicianNexus—This platform allows health systems to assess and share their capacity to teach, specifying their needs for various interns and residents. The information then can be shared with medical schools so students can apply for openings as efficiently as possible.
  • FocusMotion Health—Assessing and monitoring orthopaedic patients before and after surgery is at the center of FocusMotion Health. The company created a smart knee brace as well as a mobile application and dashboard platform that captures how much a patient walks and exercises and then sends the data to the medical provider. The company's first product, the TKR Recovery System, is aimed at patients undergoing total knee replacement. The system connects physicians and therapists to the patient, enabling daily guidance and almost real-time intervention.
  • Hawthorne Effect—Studies show that 89% of clinical trials are missing data and half of participating patients drop out before their study is completed. Hawthorne Effect has developed a virtual platform to track each patient's data. The company also trains investigators to visit patients in their homes to certify data and keep patients engaged. The result is lower patient withdrawals, more complete data collection and improved patient experience.
  • Health Note—Simplifying the process of documenting every physician-patient interaction is the mission of Health Note. The company developed a simple-to-use platform that patients sign in to before a physician appointment. The platform asks all the questions a physician would normally ask at the start of a visit. The information is formatted into a physician's note and sent to the medical record system.
  • Notisphere—Healthcare providers can get bogged down with product recalls and efforts to prevent patients from being harmed by a recalled item. To communicate recalls, the healthcare industry currently uses a mostly paper-based, slow and cumbersome process. Notisphere is a digital platform that allows suppliers to announce recalls and also enables real-time communications between product suppliers and healthcare providers.
  • OMNY—Data sharing, particularly about pharmaceutical usage, is at the heart of any healthcare system. Without centralized data, hospital teams struggle to know exactly where drugs are located or when they are utilized. The OMNY platform facilitates real-time sharing of this data, allowing hospital managers to better align the supply of a drug with the demand for it, significantly reducing cost and waste.
  • Virti— Virti employs virtual and augmented reality coupled with artificial intelligence to transport physicians and students into difficult clinical environments so they can train for emergency response. For example, Virti can virtually place physicians in stressful environments, such as an emergency department dealing with a traumatic event. Following the experience, Virti then assesses participants' actions to help improve their performance. It also helps reduce patient anxiety by creating virtual hospital experiences for patients, taking them on the journey from the parking garage to the operating room.

 

 

 

FDA Warns About Drugs Aimed at Treating Breast Cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that Ibrance (palbociclib), Kisqali (ribociclib) and Verzenio (abemaciclib) used to treat some patients with advanced breast cancers may cause rare, but severe inflammation of the lungs.

The FDA has approved new warnings about this risk to the prescribing information and Patient Package Insert for the entire class of these cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK 4/6) inhibitor medicines. The overall benefit of CDK 4/6 inhibitors is still greater than the risks when used as prescribed.

The FDA website has more information.

Circle of Friends Honorees for August

The Circle of Friends program honored 151 people in August. 

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgment.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Keith L. Agre, MD

Callie E. Albert, RN

Michael J. Alexander, MD, FACS

Sandra Asimbaya Keane

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA

Eli M. Baron, MD

Yaffa Bernstein

Keith L. Black, MD

David W. Bliss, MD

Swaraj Bose, MD

Sandra I. Brambila

Philip G. Brooks, MD

Blessie M. Bulaon

Miguel A. Burch, MD

Lori Canaday, RN

Rhona M. Castillo, RN

Tarun Chakravarty, MD

Catherine O. Chan

George E. Chaux, MD, FCCP

Melissa Chen, MD

Alexandra D. Chila, RN

Wendy A. Cocom, RN

Paul E. Cohart, MD

Hart C. Cohen, MD

Romel A. Contreras

Odelia B. Cooper, MD

Stephen R. Corday, MD

John F. Cornejo

Timothy J. Daskivich, MD

Ramon H. De Castro

Robert W. Decker, MD

Jessica E. Del Rosario, RN

Ann S. Demaio, NP

Joshua D. Ellenhorn, MD

Melissa Espinales

Mark Farber, MD, PhD

Edward J. Feldman, MD

Carrie E. Fishman, RN, MN

Alex Foxman, MD, FACP

Steven S. Galen, MD, FACC

Eli S. Gang, MD

Elayne K. Garber, MD

Jason W. Gaston

Joel M. Geiderman, MD, FACEP

Leena C. Gibson, MD

Eskedar F. Gobeze, RN, BSN

Richard N. Gold, MD

Jeanette Gonzalez

Nestor R. Gonzalez, MD

Leslie M. Gordon, RN

Ashley L. Gorelik

Cristina M. Grasu, RN, BSN, PHN

Amit Gupta, MD

Kapil Gupta, MD, MPH, FASGE

Ariz Guzman, RN

Lilit Hayrapetyan

Allen S. Ho, MD

David M. Hoffman, MD

Jethro L. Hu, MD

Robin R. Hudson, RN, CPAN

Adam C. Ivory, RN

Marlyne A. Jean, CP

Jazmin Jenkins, RN

Maria Estrella M. Jordan, RN

Stanley C. Jordan, MD

Sheila M. Kahwaty, PA-C

Marwa Kaisey, MD

Ronald P. Karlsberg, MD

Maryam Katouli, RN

Kristine Khachatryan, RN, BSN

Robert C. Klapper, MD

Bonnie S. Lee, NP

Ella L. Leggett

Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN

Keren Lerner, MD

Debby A. Leve

Lissette Lira, RN

Milton T. Little, MD

Maria Isabel Logreco

Kristle Anne M. Magtoto, CNII

James L. Mahon

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Marie Maravillas, RN

Tatyana Mascaro, RN

Michel J. Mazouz, MD

Shahab Mehdizadeh, MD

Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS

Dorothy T. Melvin

Noah M. Merin, MD, PhD

Charles N. Moon, MD

Esther Morrison, RN

Graham J. Mouw, MD

Gian Carla A. Nagano, RN

Ashley A. Nickel, RN

Nicholas N. Nissen, MD

Mazen Noureddin, MD

Ryshona M. Odeneal, RN

Ronald L. Paquette, MD

Cecilia Patino, RN, BSN

Aracely Perez

Barbara Plowden, RN, RLC, IBCLC

Shervin Rabizadeh, MD, MBA

Florian Rader, MD, M.Sc.

Anna L. Rasmussen-Weaver, RN

Alexandre Rasouli, MD

Melanie R. Ravara, RN, BSN

Lesley A. Renteria

Alma P. Reposar, RN

Luisa S. Revilla

Bobbie J. Rimel, MD

Lorena Rodriguez, RN

Ana M. Romero, RN

Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD

Paula J. Rubin

Wendy L. Sacks, MD

Farzin Samadi, MD

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Linda Sebel

Laurence O. Seigler, MD

Prediman K. Shah, MD

Cigal T. Shaham, MD, MSc, FAAP

Annie Shahinian, RN

Melissa M. Shiozaki, NP

Wendy L. Shuster, RN

Robert J. Siegel, MD

Gena T. Smith, RN

Thomas P. Sokol, MD, FASCRS

Ricky Soliva, RN

Liat Y. Solomon, RN

Andrew I. Spitzer, MD

Theodore N. Stein, MD

Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS

Sharlene Stokx

Ronald Sue, MD

Steven N. Sykes, MD

Sandra Tansman

Megan M. Thomas

Lidia Toledo, RN, MSN

Sam S. Torbati, MD

Kayle J. Tramel, RN

Nancy E. Trujillo

Jennifer D. Valdez, RN, BSN

Teresa K. Vencill, NP, MSN

Robert G. Ward

Jessica Webb, NP

Jason L. Weiner

Lea A. Weintraub, RN

Serene E. Weir, RN

Mark A. Weissman, DPM

Wade Y. Yoshii, MD

Phillip C. Zakowski, MD

Are You a Veteran? Let Us Know

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Were you in the military, or do you know a co-worker who was? For Veterans Day, The Bridge wants to honor Cedars-Sinai's military veterans. Please email thebridge@cshs.org to let us know when and in which branch you served, and any notable details about your service. Also, please include your current position at Cedars-Sinai.

CS-Link Tip: Personal Phrases

Earlier this year, you were reminded how to make SmartPhrases. SmartPhrases are the most powerful tool in CS-Link™. Many of you have asked how to find useful links to add to your personal phrases.

Links pull information from other parts of the chart. Examples include @dob@ for date of birth, @fname@ for first name and @lastcr@ for the last creatinine. There are thousands of examples.

One way to find them is to look at the SmartPhrase butler, a colorful toolbar with a little man and a question mark. Click there, and on the right select SmartLinks and search. Another resource is the new and improved SmartTool guide found here.

To learn more, attend a CS-Link Efficiency and Review for Physicians meeting on the second Thursday of each month. The classes, which begin at 7:30 a.m., are held in PEC 4.

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.