Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

President's Perspective: Access and Equity

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

I am pleased to let you know that Cedars-Sinai has further expanded eligibility for our financial assistance programs, effective Jan. 1, 2020. Also, I want to correct the erroneous idea that a hospital's community benefit should only be measured by the amount of charity care provided. From the founding of Cedars-Sinai in 1902, providing access to healthcare for the vulnerable in the community has always been an important part of our mission.

» Read more

Leadership Series: Emergency Department Utilization

Watch the next video from a series featuring executive leaders talking about the institution's most important goals and initiatives. Jeff Smith, MD, JD, MMM, talks about avoiding the Emergency Department for non-emergency care, and employees' many convenient care options for non-emergency conditions such as flu symptoms, nausea, headaches, muscle pain or sore throats. Smith is executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

» Read more

Q&A: Four Physicians Mark Black History Month

In the early 1800s, James McCune Smith wasn't allowed to attend medical school in the U.S., so he went to Scotland. When he returned with a degree, he became the first professionally trained African American physician in the nation. Although times have changed greatly since then, African American medical professionals still face unique barriers in their pursuit of education and career opportunities. In recognition of Black History Month, we sat down with four African American physicians to learn about the obstacles they've faced, how things have changed for doctors of color and where there's still room for improvement.

» Read more

LA Marathon Street Closures on March 8

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 8, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai. Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by early afternoon.

» Read more

Highlighting Heart Disease Prevention for Women

Cedars-Sinai experts who spoke at the 15th annual Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Day event earlier this month talk about the latest studies and guidelines about preventing heart disease, especially in women. 

» Read more

Medical VR Conference Coming in March

Cedars-Sinai is again hosting the highly anticipated Virtual Medicine Conference March 25-26, which is expected to draw more than 400 guests and 50 speakers from across the world to discuss how virtual reality is transforming healthcare. Discounted registration rates for employees are still available. 

» Read more

Change to Personal Email Access Policy

Due to rising security concerns, users on the Cedars-Sinai network can no longer access private email accounts. The new policy, which will impact personal email accounts such as Gmail, Yahoo Mail and iCloud, began on Friday, Feb. 14. The move will help prevent email phishing attacks on the organization's network and bring Cedars-Sinai in line with most major health systems, which take similar security measures to protect confidential data.

» Read more

Core Labs Changing Procalcitonin Assay March 10

The Core Laboratories within the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will be changing its procalcitonin (PCT) assay from a Roche to an Abbott immunoassay beginning Tuesday, March 10. PCT is used to diagnose and monitor sepsis, particularly early sepsis.

» Read more

Educational Series to Focus on Global Healthcare

Julie A. Freischlag, MD, chief executive officer, Wake Forest Baptist Health, and dean of Wake Forest School of Medicine, will speak at the quarterly Global Healthcare Grand Rounds on Monday, Feb. 24, at 10:30 a.m. The one-hour lecture will be held in Pavilion, PEC 6 and 7. CME credit is available to attendees.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for January

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The Circle of Friends program honored 129 people in January. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Patient Care and Treatment Teams

CS-Link™ provides various lists to keep track of who is caring for the patient. Two of the most common ones are the patient Care Team list and the Treatment Team list. Although sometimes used interchangeably, these are not the same and serve different purposes.

» Read more

President's Perspective: Access and Equity

By Thomas M. Priselac, President and CEO

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I am pleased to let you know that Cedars-Sinai has further expanded eligibility for our financial assistance programs, effective Jan. 1, 2020. Also, I want to correct the erroneous idea that a hospital's community benefit should only be measured by the amount of charity care provided.

First, about the expanded eligibility: This is one part of our longstanding commitment to providing community benefit and accessibility to healthcare—especially for low- or no-income patients. We now provide free care to people earning up to 400% of the federal poverty level ($103,000 for a family of four) and significantly discounted care to those earning up to 600% of the federal poverty level ($154,500 for a family of four).

A key benefit of the Affordable Care Act (and Covered California) has been an increase in people who now have some type of insurance coverage (Medi-Cal or commercial health insurance). Consistent with the reason the Affordable Care Act was passed, there has been a statewide decline in patients who need traditional "charity care" for the uninsured. However, there has been an increase in commercial insurance plans that have a high deductible or copay, which is causing financial difficulty for patients. To help address this, as well as continue to support the uninsured poor (who need traditional "charity care"), Cedars-Sinai has expanded the eligibility criteria for free or discounted care. This will enable more people to be eligible for our financial assistance.  

Second, about the erroneous idea that a hospital's community benefit should only be measured by the amount of charity care provided: For decades, the measurement of a hospital's community benefit has gone far beyond the amount of charity care provided. While direct financial assistance programs such as charity care are an important part of total community benefit, they do not provide an accurate view of a hospital's community benefit in the 21st century. As a nonprofit, nongovernmental hospital, Cedars-Sinai provides community benefit in many ways, including paying for the unreimbursed costs of our care for Medi-Cal and Medicare patients (because government payments to hospitals are well below the cost of care), the unreimbursed costs of our medical research and education programs, grants to community service organizations and a broad array of programs to improve the health of the community. (In FY2018, our total community benefit contribution was $561 million, or 16.5% of total expenses.)

The narrow view that a hospital's community benefit contribution should be measured only by looking at the traditional "charity care" provided has been outdated since the mid-1960s, when government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid began. Starting back then, the measure of a hospital's contributions to the less fortunate and to the wellbeing of the community was broadened to include the types of programs, services and initiatives that comprise a hospital's community benefit today.

This includes strengthening underserved communities by partnering with local organizations and reducing health disparities.  And it recognizes that government programs such as Medi-Cal and Medicare do not fully cover the cost of caring for these patients. (This is especially significant at Cedars-Sinai, which serves substantially more Medicare patients—many of whom are low-income individuals who are also on Medi-Cal—than any other hospital in the state, and is in the top 16% of all hospitals in California for number of Medi-Cal patients.)

From the founding of Cedars-Sinai in 1902, providing access to healthcare for the vulnerable in the community has always been an important part of our mission. Thank you for sharing Cedars-Sinai's commitment to the health of our region.  

 

Leadership Series: Emergency Department Utilization

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Watch the next video from a series featuring executive leaders talking about the institution's most important goals and initiatives. Jeff Smith, MD, JD, MMM, talks about avoiding the Emergency Department for non-emergency care, and employees' many convenient care options for non-emergency conditions such as flu symptoms, nausea, headaches, muscle pain or sore throats. Smith is executive vice president of Hospital Operations and chief operating officer of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

Want to see more of the Leadership Video Series? Click here to meet Cedars-Sinai's executive leaders, hear their insights and learn more about the role you play in fulfilling Cedars-Sinai's mission. Past video topics include operational efficiency, patient care, hospital flow and service.

 

Q&A: Four Physicians Mark Black History Month

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Kyle Monk, MD, treats a patient at Cedars-Sinai.

In the early 1800s, James McCune Smith wasn't allowed to attend medical school in the U.S., so he went to Scotland. When he returned with a degree, he became the first professionally trained African American physician in the nation. Although times have changed greatly since then, African American medical professionals still face unique barriers in their pursuit of education and career opportunities. 

In recognition of Black History Month, we sat down with four African American physicians to learn about the obstacles they've faced, how things have changed for doctors of color and where there's still room for improvement. 

Question: What types of struggles did you face in your pursuit of medicine?

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Keith Black, MD

Keith Black, MD, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery: As a physician of color, you face both conscious and unconscious bias. It's more obvious in training situations, more than when you're in practice. I recall scenarios as a medical student where I really sensed it. When I decided I wanted to be a neurosurgeon, I met with the chair of neurosurgery at my school for advice. The feedback from him was, "Why are you asking about this? You have to be smart to be a neurosurgeon." The only thing he knew about me was the color of my skin—he didn't know my academic background.

Milton LittleMD, orthopaedics trauma surgeon: Less than 3% of orthopaedists in the U.S. are black. It's very rare to even meet another African American orthopaedist. In some situations, you might be the only person of color in the residency program or on staff at the hospital. I was lucky enough to go to Stanford, where I was exposed to successful people of color from a lot of backgrounds and they set an example for me of what could be accomplished. I was also lucky enough to train at institutions with numerous African American faculty and residents.

Depsite these factors, I can't count how many times I walked into a patient's room and they asked if I was the person who would be transporting them. I've had patients refuse my care because I was black. I've treated patients with Confederate flags and Nazi tattoos. You just have to focus on the job and maybe it will change their opinion, maybe not. In the end, you can't let that change the way you treat them.

Adam Milam, MD, PhDchief anesthesiology resident: I was encouraged to take a leave of absence during college because I had to work and was discouraged from applying to medical school. Thankfully, I had a great mentor and supportive family. Even after navigating this process and becoming a physician, there are additional obstacles. I'm often not seen as a physician although I have both a doctorate and medical degree. 

Q: What's your advice for African American youths thinking about pursuing medicine?

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Milton Little, MD

Black: If you enjoy science and helping people, it's one of the most rewarding careers you can have. You will encounter situations where you'll face bias and you'll have to come up with a strategy to deal with that. You'll have to be better and more prepared. 

Little: You might not have the same advantages of people from different backgrounds. You have a very small margin of error, so being as successful as possible on standardized tests and objective measurements removes questions about your qualifications. Find a mentor, someone you can trust and talk to, someone who will give you advice on how to make good decisions. Understand there will be setbacks, but that shouldn't discourage you.

Kyle MonkMDpediatrician: I would encourage any youth, especially of color, to pursue a career in medicine. Each day I am reminded how important it is to have a physician that looks like you caring for you. The patients thank me for being a positive role model for their children.

Q: How have things changed or improved for African American physicians in medicine during your career?

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Adam Milam, MD, PhD

Black: Society at large is more aware of bias than it was before, and we're collectively trying to address those issues. Unfortunately, as a whole we haven't made a lot of progress increasing the number of physicians of color, trainees, scientists, or the pipeline for future doctors. There's still a lot to be done.  

Milam: Unfortunately, I don't think there have been major improvements for African American physicians in medicine over the last decade. The number of African American and other underrepresented minority physicians has not improved despite research showing improvements in morbidity with more diverse medical staff.

Monk: I am still very early in my career so I haven't noticed many changes, but over the past year I have noticed Cedars-Sinai making a bigger effort to support minority staff with mentorship and having our providers better represent the patients we serve.

Q: Why is diversity in medicine important?

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Kyle Monk, MD

Black: In almost every situation, whether it's medicine or business, having a diverse talent pool just creates a better product. It brings different perspectives that are broader and more creative. In dealing with health challenges we're going to face globally and as a nation, if we don't address healthcare disparities, we're not going to deliver the type of healthcare we're going to need in society. It's not going to just affect the people who are disadvantaged, it's going to affect all of us.

Little: Black and African American patients have a tenuous history with the medical profession due to things like the Tuskegee experiements. Numerous studies have also shown the impact of implicit bias in relation to patient care, especially in areas like maternal mortality rates, cardiovascular interventions and arthritis care for patients of color.

Having someone who might look like you or might have similar experiences as you could bring a sense of comfort and limit the bias that exists so patients can be treated with the same level of care. 

Milam: African Americans make up only 6% of the physician workforce, and the disparity is more apparent in certain specialties such as orthopaedic surgery and dermatology. There is evidence that increased diversity among the medical workforce not only improves patient care and patient satisfaction and helps to reduce health disparities, it also improves learning outcomes, cultural sensitivity and interpersonal skills for all students.

Cedars-Sinai values the diversity of all its employees and celebrates the achievements of its African American team members. For additional information about how Cedars-Sinai promotes a dynamic and inclusive work environment, contact Nicole Mitchell, director of Diversity and Inclusion.

LA Marathon Street Closures on March 8

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The Los Angeles Marathon Sunday, March 8, could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

The Los Angeles Marathon will be held Sunday, March 8, and could affect commutes to Cedars-Sinai.

Numerous street closures will begin at 4 a.m., including some freeway ramps. For much of the day, the only ways to cross the marathon route will be on the 405, 101 or 110 freeways.

Physicians headed to the medical center that morning are advised to arrive before 5 a.m., when most of the road closures near Cedars-Sinai will begin. Most roads close to the medical center should reopen by early afternoon.

The course runs from Dodger Stadium to Santa Monica, passing just north and west of Cedars-Sinai.

Streets and freeway ramps near the course will close from as early as 4 a.m. until the afternoon. The best access to the medical center for those coming from north of the marathon route will be from the 10 Freeway, exiting at Robertson or La Cienega boulevards.

The marathon's website includes an interactive map of street closures associated with the race.

For the latest traffic alerts and updates, tune into local news radio stations or check websites such as:

Highlighting Heart Disease Prevention for Women

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Cedars-Sinai health professionals dressed in red to show support for heart disease prevention. 

What do the latest studies and guidelines say about preventing heart disease, especially in women? Cedars-Sinai experts provided updates for the 15th annual Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Day event.

Here are some highlights:

C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, the director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center and of the Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Program at the Smidt Heart Institute, talked about diet and alcohol. She noted that, according to the American Heart Association (AHA), one alcoholic drink a day for women is linked to a lower risk of ischemic heart disease—ailments linked to plaque buildup inside blood vessels. Yet to substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, Bairey Merz pointed out, the AHA recommendation is to focus on a healthy diet. "The data are increasingly clear that you are what you eat," she said.

Bairey Merz also cited a study by Northwestern and Cornell University researchers published recently suggesting that higher consumption of processed meat, unprocessed red meat and poultry—but not fish—is associated with a small increased risk of heart disease. And she pointed out that coconut oil—which some people have championed as heart-healthy—actually has been shown to elevate blood cholesterol.

Adrienne Youdim, MD, an associate clinical professor of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai, reviewed intermittent fasting. That's a catch-all term including practices such as fasting every other day or restricting eating to only a six- or eight-hour window during the day and avoiding food the rest of the time.

Youdim said there is "intriguing" evidence that, as proponents maintain, such diets provide health benefits beyond weight loss. She also said the diets can be an effective short-term weight-loss tactic.

But Youdim expressed skepticism that most Americans could maintain such a routine over the long haul and recommended considering "more solid, realistic long-term" approaches.

"There are so many other ways to achieve heart health," Youdim said. "Weight loss in any fashion is going to improve your cardiovascular health. So does exercise independent of weight loss, and so does adequate sleep, and so does meditation."

Chrisandra Shufelt, MD, MS, associate director of the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, cited studies in recent years that are revamping long-held understandings about the value of women taking aspirin daily to prevent heart attacks or strokes. Aspirin still is recommended for women who have suffered heart attacks or have heart disease. But the new research, Shufelt said, "has completely changed who we are recommending to take a baby aspirin for primary prevention"—meaning prevention among women who haven't suffered heart attacks or have heart disease.

Shufelt said the three latest clinical trials found that, for many women in the low-risk category, aspirin doesn't prevent heart attacks. What's more, in these studies aspirin increased the chance of major bleeding problems, especially among women. All told, the risks of bleeding outweigh any benefit for heart health in women at low risk or above the age of 70.

Margo B. Minissian, PhD, a faculty research scientist at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center, reported on scientific progress toward a twice-a-year injectable known as an mRNA inhibitor that could potentially lower the risks posed by high cholesterol.

Although it still would be used with statins, it possibly could reduce reliance on pills that need to be taken daily, particularly for people who suffer side effects from medication. Other injectable treatments—called PCSK9 inhibitors—have been approved and entered the market in recent years, but they require two injections a month.

"We're really getting closer to this idea of vaccinating ourselves from dangerously high cholesterol levels," Minissian said in an interview.

Florian Rader, MD, medical director of the Human Physiology Laboratory at the Smidt Heart Institute, reviewed hypertension guidelines that were made more stringent in 2017. As a result, 100 million Americans—up from 70 million previously—are considered to have hypertension. Rader recommended more aggressive measures, including dietary and lifestyle changes and greater use of medications, to lower hypertension risks.

He said the nation's hypertension control rate of 39%—the percentage of people whose hypertension is under control—is "very low" and needs to be improved. He also noted that women tend to develop hypertension later in life but then their blood pressure rises more swiftly than it does in men, which he said could explain some health disparities between older women and men.

Medical VR Conference Coming in March

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Laura Garcia helps Robert Chernoff, PhD, adjust his VR goggles at the second annual Virtual Medicine Conference at Cedars-Sinai.

Cedars-Sinai is again hosting the highly anticipated Virtual Medicine Conference March 25-26, which is expected to draw more than 400 guests and 50 speakers from across the world to discuss how virtual reality (VR) is transforming healthcare. Discounted registration rates for employees are still available.

"Virtual reality has the potential to offer immersive, multisensory environments that nudge our brains to thinking we are somewhere, or even, someone else," said Brennan Spiegel, MD, MSHS, director of Health Service Research and host of the annual conference. "Soon, doctors may recommend a virtual beach vacation to ease aches and pains instead of prescribing another pill. Psychiatrists might treat social anxiety by inviting patients to a dinner party or reminisce with Alzheimer's patients in a replica of their childhood home. Virtual reality affords us the opportunity to think much differently."

During the two-day conference, attendees will review evidence supporting the efficacy of medical VR, study use cases where VR worked—and didn't work—to improve outcomes, learn best practices and pragmatic tips for implementing VR into clinical workflows, discuss the cost-effectiveness and payer perspectives of therapeutic VR programs and hear directly from patients who have received VR therapeutics.

Spiegel will kick off the conference on March 25 by discussing the "empathy machine," how virtual reality is strengthening the humanity in healing. He will be followed by dozens of speakers who are leaders in the field, including many of Cedars-Sinai's experts, including Melissa Wong, MD, an OB-GYN and maternal fetal medicine specialist, Itai Danovitch, MD, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, and Keith Black, MD, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery.

Cedars-Sinai remains a leader in medical VR, with studies ranging in topics from looking into the effectiveness of VR in combating pain for hospitalized patients to easing pain during childbirth.

"The conference is open to anyone, not just clinical providers or those with experience in virtual reality," said Spiegel. "The broader and more diverse the attendees, the more we can learn and advance from this jam-packed two-day event."

Discounted employee tickets can be purchased here.

The Virtual Medicine Conference is supported in part by the Marc and Sheri Rapaport Fund for Digital Health Science and Precision Health.

 

 

Change to Personal Email Access Policy

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Due to rising security concerns, users on the Cedars-Sinai network can no longer access private email accounts.

The new policy, which began Friday, Feb. 14, impacts personal email accounts such as Gmail, Yahoo Mail and iCloud, and is designed to prevent email phishing attacks on the Cedars-Sinai network. The policy also will bring Cedars-Sinai in line with most major health systems, which take similar security measures to protect confidential data. 

A few points to remember:

  • Personal email is still accessible via your phone when disconnected from the Cedars-Sinai Wi-Fi network, CSHSPrivate.
  • Users of our guest Wi-Fi network (provided to patients and their families) can still access their personal mail.
  • Cedars-Sinai email system can still receive and send to personal email accounts.
  • Restrictions for personal email access via the Cedars-Sinai network include the following: All web browser-based email, e.g., connecting to mail.google.com via the Internet Explorer app, and mail client access, e.g., using Apple Mail to access a personal email account.

Cedars-Sinai maintains a sophisticated email security system that minimizes the dangers posed by the increasing number of email phishing attacks. While personal email service has some security features, they do not meet the high bar required to safeguard private health data.

Core Labs Changing Procalcitonin Assay March 10

The Core Laboratories within the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine will be changing its procalcitonin (PCT) assay from a Roche to an Abbott immunoassay beginning Tuesday, March 10. PCT is used to diagnose and monitor sepsis, particularly early sepsis.

The reference cutoff for normal individuals will nominally change from < 0.09 ng/mL (Roche) to < 0.08 ng/mL (Abbott). Both manufacturer's immunoassays utilize the same antibodies so correlation of results is excellent.

However, the Abbott assay does not incorporate streptavidin-biotin binding in its methodology, whereas Roche does, so the Abbott assay is not subject to potential biotin interference from patients consuming dietary supplements.

Abbott also has extended clinical claims approved by the FDA, but these are already reflected in the existing comments we append to all PCT results (as shown below), which were derived from literature and were reviewed by our Antimicrobial Stewardship Committee.

If you have questions, contact Kimia Sobhani at kimiasobhani@cshs.org, or Anders Berg, PhD, at anders.berg@cshs.org.

Reference Range: Less than or equal to 0.08 ng/mL.

For suspected sepsis:

Initial Procalcitonin <0.5 ng/mL: antibiotics discouraged.

Repeat Procalcitonin <0.5 ng/mL or a decrease of >80% from peak: supports antibiotic discontinuation.

Repeat Procalcitonin <0.25 ng/mL: strongly supports antibiotic discontinuation.

For suspected pulmonary infections:

Initial Procalcitonin <0.25 ng/mL: antibiotics discouraged.

Repeat Procalcitonin <0.25 ng/mL or a decrease of >80% from peak: supports antibiotic discontinuation.

Procalcitonin <0.1 ng/mL or decrease of >90% from highest value: strongly supports antibiotic discontinuation.

An increase in Procalcitonin or prolonged elevated levels requires re-evaluation for source control, may represent inadequate treatment of infection, or may be due to conditions causing false positive results.

Sager R, Kutz A, Mueller B, et al. Procalcitonin-guided diagnosis and antibiotic stewardship revisited. BMC Medicine 2017: 15:15-25.”

Educational Series to Focus on Global Healthcare

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Julie A. Freischlag, MD

Julie A. Freischlag, MD, chief executive officer, Wake Forest Baptist Health, and dean of Wake Forest School of Medicine, will speak at the quarterly Global Healthcare Grand Rounds on Monday, Feb. 24, at 10:30 a.m. The one-hour lecture will be held in Pavilion, PEC 6 and 7.

The lecture will examine globalization and its effects on population health and the delivery of healthcare in the U.S. and worldwide and will identify emerging trends, best practices and global dynamics unique to international collaborations and knowledge transfer in healthcare.

As CEO and dean, Freischlag has overall responsibility for the health system's clinical, academic and innovation enterprises and its annual operating budget of $3 billion. Previously, Freischlag was vice chancellor for Human Health Sciences and dean of the School of Medicine at the University of California, Davis.

The lecture is open to physicians, physicians-in-training, physician assistants, nurses and any one interested in learning about advances in global healthcare and the implications for patient care.

CME credit is available to attendees. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, contact Jacqueline Nassar at 310-423-3192 or jacqueline.nassar@cshs.org.

Circle of Friends Honorees for January

The Circle of Friends program honored 129 people in January. 

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgment.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

Ohara Aivaz, MD

Michael J. Alexander, MD, FACS

Sandra Asimbaya Keane

Katelyn Atkins, MD, PhD

Michel Babajanian, MD, FACS

Janice M. Barnes

Brian M. Benway, MD

Jason A. Berkley, DO

Daniel S. Berman, MD

Derek Boardman, RN

Philip G. Brooks

Eileen G. Brown, RN, OCN

Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD

Blessie M. Bulaon

Miguel A. Burch, MD

Michele Burnison, MD

Alisha Cabrera, CN II

Marshia G. Caceres, MSW, LCSW, ACM

Brendan J. Carroll, MD

Alice P. Chung, MD, FACS

Donald S. Cohen

Stephen R. Corday, MD

Stephanie G. Cordeta, BSRT(R) (M) CRT, APRT

John F. Cornejo

Julie S. Corona

Lawrence S. Czer, MD

Hal C. Danzer, MD

Josef A. Degendorfer

Maria Delgadillo-Authier

Stephen C. Deutsch, MD, FACP

Fardad Esmailian, MD

Melissa Espinales

Joel D. Feinstein, MD

Edward J. Feldman, MD

Carrie E. Fishman, RN, MN

Phillip R. Fleshner, MD

John D. Friedman, MD

Larry Froch, MD

Kristi M. Funk, MD

Jason W. Gaston

Joel M. Geiderman

Eskedar F. Gobeze, RN, BSN

Jeanette Gonzalez

Ashley L. Gorelik

Kapil Gupta

Solomon I. Hamburg, MD, PhD

Omid Hamid, MD

Kacey Haptonstall

Nebil S. Hassen

Lilit Hayrapetyan

Gail K. Higa, RN, OCN

Gary H. Hoffman, MD

David D. Hopp, MD

Martin L. Hopp, MD, PhD

Robin R. Hudson, RN, CPAN

Asma Hussaini, MS, PA-C

Scott A. Irwin, MD, PhD

Sousan Karimi, MD

Stephen P. Kay, MD

Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH, FACC, FASE

Michelle M. Kittleson

David A. Kulber, MD, FACS

Ella L. Leggett

Madeline S. Lerman, RN, BSN

Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP

Rajendra Makkar, MD

Adam N. Mamelak, MD, FACS

Leah A. Marsh, MD

Philomena F. McAndrew

Dorothy T. Melvin

Becky J. Miller, MD

Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc

Charles N. Moon, MD

Jaime D. Moriguchi, MD, FACC

Esther Morrison, RN

Nena M. Musto, RN

Mamoo Nakamura, MD

Alan C. Newman, DDS

Nicholas N. Nissen, MD

Steven Oppenheim, MD

Alex Ortiz

Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD

Alice F. Peng, MD

Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS

Francesca M. Pimentel

Barry D. Pressman, MD, FACR

Alexandre Rasouli, MD

Jacqueline Robertson

Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD

Paula J. Rubin

Amy S. Rutman, MD

Gregory P. Sarna, MD

Maureen C. Scanlan

Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC

Wouter I. Schievink, MD

Linda Sebel

Prediman K. Shah, MD

Michael M. Shehata, MD

Pamela Shieh

Wendy L. Shuster, RN

Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, FAAN

Lisa A. Silva

Amanuel Sima, MD, FAASM

Gena T. Smith, RN

Jeffrey A. Smith, MD, JD, MMM

Jay J. Stein, MD, FACS

Alan J. Steinberg

Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA

Kylie L. Tanabe, PA-C

Megan M. Thomas

Lidia Toledo, RN, MSN

Jenny Ton

Sam S. Torbati, MD

Nora G. Torres

Duc T. Tran, MD

Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS

Nancy E. Trujillo

Jennifer D. Valdez, RN, BSN

Michael B. Van Scoy-Mosher, MD

Robert A. Vescio, MD

Willis H. Wagner, MD, FACS

Lea A. Weintraub, RN

Paula J. Whiteman, MD, FACEP, FAAP

Nevelyn Williams

Edward M. Wolin

Clement C. Yang

Phillip C. Zakowski

Alma Zavala

Millard H. Zisser, MD

CS-Link Tip: Patient Care and Treatment Teams

CS-Link™ provides various lists to keep track of who is caring for the patient. Two of the most common ones are the patient Care Team list and the Treatment Team list.

Although sometimes used interchangeably, these are not the same and serve different purposes. The Care Team list is used to keep track of the providers that work with a patient over a level of time. This includes the time spanning over potentially multiple outpatient and inpatient encounters. The Treatment Team list is the group of people responsible for a patient's short-term care during a specific inpatient or emergency encounter.

Both lists are available in the Patient Care Teams activity in CS-Link. You may have to find this activity in the More Activities button on the right of your navigation tabs. Alternatively, clicking on the PCP or Attending provider in Storyboard will also take you directly to the activity.

The Treatment Team list, however, only appears in the activity during a hospital or emergency encounter. You can add yourself or others to the list. A useful feature of the Care Teams list is the option of receiving In Basket alerts of when the patient is admitted and either all or just abnormal labs. You can choose which alerts to receive at the time you add yourself to the list.

If you have questions, feel free to contact us at groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.