Cedars-Sinai

Medical Staff Pulse Newsletter

Letter From Chief of Staff: Coronavirus

By Marc A. Edelstein, MD, Chief of Staff

We are monitoring the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) that began in Wuhan, China, and taking essential measures to ensure the health and safety of our caregivers and patients in accordance with updated information from public health agencies.

» Read more

Cedars-Sinai Opens Flagship Medical Offices in Tarzana

Cedars-Sinai marked a milestone in its goal to bring high-quality care to neighborhoods across the Southern California region by hosting the opening of its flagship medical offices in the San Fernando Valley on Jan. 29. The 40,000-square-foot location at 18133 Ventura Blvd. features a multidisciplinary cancer center, with orthopaedic specialists from the Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute and an internal medicine office following soon. The facility is a short drive from Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center.

» Read more

Wear Red Feb. 7, Support Women's Heart Health Day

Employees are encouraged to support the Linda Joy Pollin Women’s Heart Health Day on Friday, Feb. 7, by dressing in red, participating in heart health screenings and attending a program to hear from experts in the field.

» Read more

Results: 2019 Culture of Safety Survey

Staff from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network participated in the 2019 "I am the voice of patient safety" survey, which ran Nov. 4-18. The survey is designed to help leadership better appreciate the degree to which employees and affiliated physicians understand their role in patient safety and feel management support for their efforts. 

» Read more

Lung Cancer Expert to Head Medical Oncology

Prominent lung cancer expert Karen L. Reckamp, MD, MS, has been selected to be director of the Division of Medical Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Cancer. Reckamp also will serve as medical oncology director of the Women’s Guild Lung Institute in Cedars-Sinai's Department of Medicine and associate director of Clinical Research at Cedars-Sinai Cancer.

» Read more

MD Who Volunteers as Reserve Officer Saves a Life on Duty

Los Angeles police raced to the scene early this month after getting a call about a military veteran threatening to kill herself. Officers from the LAPD's Southwest Division found the woman in her bedroom unconscious and not breathing. But then one of them managed to quickly resuscitate her, and kept her alive until an ambulance arrived. The fast-thinking hero of the moment was someone who had seen plenty of life-and-death struggles, but he wasn't a regular police officer. Instead, he was a reserve officer, an LAPD volunteer. At the Southwest station, he’s known as "Doc." But at Cedars-Sinai, he's Paul Strauss, MD.

» Read more

Women's Blood Vessels Age Faster Than Men's

New research from the Smidt Heart Institute showed for the first time that women's blood vessels—including both large and small arteries—age at a faster rate than men's. The findings, recently published in the journal JAMA Cardiology, could help to explain why women tend to develop different types of cardiovascular disease and with different timing than men.

» Read more

New Guidelines for Vancomycin Dosing Start Feb. 18

Based on updated guidelines, the Department of Pharmacy Services is modernizing the process it doses vancomycin beginning Feb. 18. Benefits of the new guidelines include: improved efficacy and safety, reduced need for vancomycin level monitoring and reduced total daily doses of vancomycin. If you have any questions, contact the antimicrobial stewardship pharmacists at 310-423-5352 or GroupPharmacyAUR@cshs.org.

» Read more

FDA Strengthens Warning About Clozapine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is strengthening an existing warning that constipation caused by the schizophrenia medicine clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo ODT, Versacloz, generics) can progress to serious bowel complications. This can lead to hospitalization or even death if constipation is not diagnosed and treated quickly.

» Read more

Medical Library Offers Classes to Learn New Skills

The Cedars-Sinai Medical Library is offering a variety of classes in February and March. Classes are at noon in the Medical Library—Plaza Level, South Tower, Room 2815.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Storyboard

Storyboard in CS-Link™ doesn’t just provide a stunning new look to a patient's chart. It is packed with features and tools that are designed to make your workflow more efficient and decrease the need for mouse clicks. Did you know, for example, that under each item in the Storyboard lies wonderful extra information related to that item?

» Read more

Letter From Chief of Staff: Coronavirus

By Marc A. Edelstein, MD, Chief of Staff

We are monitoring the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) that began in Wuhan, China, and taking essential measures to ensure the health and safety of our caregivers and patients in accordance with updated information from public health agencies. In order to keep you and our patients safe, please note the following:  

  • If you have returned from mainland China within the last 14 days, contact Employee Health Services (EHS) at 310-423-3322, who will perform a screening for fever or respiratory symptoms, and provide additional details. After hours, you can contact the administrator on duty at 310-248-9690. If you have traveled from Hong Kong, Taiwan or other countries, it is not necessary to call.  
  • In caring for your patients, attached is current guidance for clinicians, as of Feb. 1, from LACDPH and CDC for ambulatory and inpatient settingsIt can be found at this link: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/hcp/clinical-criteria.html and in the PDFs below.

As a reminder:

    • Always mask anyone with signs of a respiratory illness (as it is still flu season).
    • Consider the diagnosis of 2019-nCoV infection in any returned traveler from China within the last 14 days with fever or respiratory symptoms.
    • Patients suspected of having 2019-nCoV infection should immediately wear a surgical mask and be placed in a private room with the door closed (ideally an airborne isolation room, if available). Healthcare workers should use standard, contact and airborne precautions (i.e., N95 respirator) with eye protection.
    • Currently, testing is only available through the CDC and requires approval through the local health department.
    • Immediately notify Hospital Epidemiology at 310-423-5574 of any patient suspected of having 2019-nCoV infection.

Additional information about the 2019 novel coronavirus can be found at this CDC webpage. Check this CDC link often, as information is updated frequently.  

Our top priority is protecting your health and safety, as well as the health safety of all our patients, visitors and staff. Thank you for all you do to care for our patients and for one another.

CDC Update on 2019 Novel Coronavirus (PDF)  

Identify-assess-flowchart (PDF)  

Cedars-Sinai Opens Flagship Medical Offices in Tarzana

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At the opening of the new Cedars-Sinai medical offices in Tarzana, (from left) John Jenrette, MD, executive vice president of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network, Diana Williams, CEO of the West Valley Warner Center Chamber of Commerce, Councilmember Bob Blumenfield and Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai, cut the ceremonial ribbon.

Cedars-Sinai marked a milestone in its goal to bring high-quality care to neighborhoods across the Southern California region by hosting the opening of its flagship medical offices in the San Fernando Valley on Jan. 29.

The 40,000-square-foot location at 18133 Ventura Blvd. features a multidisciplinary cancer center, with orthopaedic specialists from the Cedars-Sinai Kerlan-Jobe Institute and an internal medicine office following soon. The facility is a short drive from Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center.

"We are on a mission to bring our doctors and care closer to where our patients live and work," said John Jenrette, MD, executive vice president of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network.

The Tarzana location offers extensive cancer care, including radiation oncology, medical oncology and an infusion center, surgical oncology and diagnostic imaging.

"We're the first to provide the Valley area with a full range of cancer services from an academic medical center," said Dan Theodorescu, MD, PhD, director of Cedars-Sinai Cancer. "We believe it's important to make life less complicated for our cancer patients. By offering comprehensive care in a convenient location, we hope to accomplish that."

The clinics also will include on-site labs and X-ray services. Most forms of insurance are accepted, including HMO, POS, PPO and Medicare.

"We are proud and excited to be opening our flagship Valley medical offices in Tarzana," said President and CEO Thomas M. Priselac. "We are ensuring that a community of expert physicians and caregivers is right there, ready to make a difference."

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The infusion center at the new Cedars-Sinai medical offices in Tarzana.

Wear Red Feb. 7, Support Women's Heart Health Day

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The 2019 Wear Red group photo.

Employees are encouraged to support the Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Day on Friday, Feb. 7, by dressing in red, participating in heart health screenings and attending a program to hear from experts in the field.

The 15th annual Linda Joy Pollin Women’s Heart Health Day, hosted by the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center at the Smidt Heart Institute, will bring together grateful patients and guests, including speaker Angelina Spicer. Spicer is a comedian, creator and “mommy-time” enthusiast who is known for her viral comedy sketches.

Employees can take advantage of wellness stations, meditation and chair massages, a photo booth, blood pressure screenings and cardiac risk assessments from 8-11 a.m. in Harvey Morse Auditorium.

At 11 a.m., attendees will assemble in front of Pavilion for a group photo. Participants are urged to wear red.

Lunch will be served at noon before a host of speakers share updates in women’s heart health. Speakers will include:

  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, director of the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center and the Linda Joy Pollin Women’s Heart Health Program at the Smidt Heart Institute
  • Margo Minissian, PhD, research scientist, cardiology nurse practitioner at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center at the Smidt Heart Institute
  • Chrisandra Shufelt, MD, director of the Women's Hormone and Menopause Program at the Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center
  • Florian Rader, MD, MSc, medical director of the Human Physiology Laboratory and assistant director of the Non-Invasive Laboratory at the Smidt Heart Institute
  • Adrienne Youdim, MD, professor of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai and founder of the Center for Weight Loss and Nutrition at the Lasky Clinic in Beverly Hills, California.

The event is sponsored by the Linda Joy Pollin Women’s Heart Health Program at Cedars-Sinai’s Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Center.

For additional information, please contact Kelsey Jilg at 310-248-6556 or kelsey.jilg@cshs.org.

 

Results: 2019 Culture of Safety Survey

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Staff from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network participated in the 2019 "I am the voice of patient safety" survey, which ran Nov. 4-18.

The survey, adapted from the Agency for Health Care Quality (AHRQ) Survey on Patient Safety Culture, was confidential, with results grouped by department or unit. Survey participants at the medical center included managers and staff who provide direct and indirect patient care in areas such as admissions, case management, clinical operations, clinical care services, as well as faculty and other physicians and house staff. In the medical network, physicians and both clinical and nonclinical staff were surveyed.

The survey is designed to help leadership better appreciate the degree to which employees and affiliated physicians understand their role in patient safety and feel management supports their efforts. Of those asked to take the survey, 82% of Medical Network employees and physicians completed it, as did 64% of medical center staff. Medical Network participation increased by 15% and medical center participation was nearly 20% higher than the 2017 survey. Results were available to be shared on Nov. 20.

One key survey result indicated that engaged employees score higher on all elements of patient safety.

"Understanding staff perceptions of safety is critical to enhance our safety culture," said Edward Seferian, MD, chief patient safety officer. "The information will be used to identify opportunities to maintain and enhance a culture of safety that supports staff in achieving our mission of providing the highest-quality, patient-centered, safe, efficient and effective care possible."

Key Findings

Cedars-Sinai Medical Network

  • Medical Network results improved in all surveyed domains, including leadership support for patient safety, communication openness and communication about error.
  • The best-scoring item was the safety culture index score based on the statement, "I would recommend this organization to family and friends as a safe place to seek care."
  • Leadership support for patient safety was the second-highest category, based on four questions including statements like "Leadership takes patient care mistakes seriously so repeat mistakes are not made."
  • Communication openness received a "very high" impact on safety culture, based on four questions including statements like, "Staff are encouraged to ask questions when something does not seem right."
  • Ease of voicing disagreement, as well as providers and staff speaking openly about office problems, were the lowest-rated areas.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

  • The organization scored better than the AHRQ benchmark in multiple areas, including management support for patient safety, organizational learning and continuous improvement, communication openness, feedback and communication about error and frequency of events reported.
  • Non-punitive response to error, while still an opportunity and a focus for improvement over the last several years, was also higher than benchmark and showed a significant improvement from the 2017 survey.
  • While still scoring high, areas that were slightly below benchmark included teamwork within units and manager expectations and actions for promoting patient safety.

Similar to benchmark, staffing was noted as an opportunity and one of the lowest-rated areas for the Medical Network and the medical center.

Area leaders have shared results with their staff and have been asked to take one step to promote a culture of safety—particularly one that ensures staff will feel safe to speak up and bring safety concerns forward.

"By asking leaders to focus their efforts on tangible, positive next steps, we hope to improve feedback, communication and engagement across Cedars-Sinai," said Caroline Goldzweig, MD, MSHS, chief medical officer of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network. "Everyone has a voice in patient safety, and all of their feedback is invaluable."

 

 

Lung Cancer Expert to Head Medical Oncology

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Karen Reckamp, MD, is the new director of Medical Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Cancer.

Prominent lung cancer expert Karen L. Reckamp, MD, MS, has been selected to be director of the Division of Medical Oncology at Cedars-Sinai Cancer. Reckamp also will serve as medical oncology director of the Women’s Guild Lung Institute in Cedars-Sinai's Department of Medicine and associate director of Clinical Research at Cedars-Sinai Cancer. 

The selection of Reckamp reflects her trailblazing research in advancing treatments and therapies for lung cancer—particularly the most advanced and difficult-to-treat cases—and her distinguished record of clinical research and scholarship.

In her role as assistant director of Clinical Research, Reckamp will guide the growth of cancer clinical research services across Cedars-Sinai as well as develop a robust Cedars-Sinai Cancer clinical trial portfolio.

"Dr. Reckamp is an outstanding addition to our faculty," said Dan Theodorescu, MD, PhD, director of Cedars-Sinai Cancer. "Her deep knowledge of the field and expertise will greatly contribute to positioning the lung institute as one of the best in the nation, while providing Cedars-Sinai Cancer patients with exciting new options for lung cancer treatment."

As medical oncology director in the Women's Guild Lung Institute, Reckamp will concentrate her efforts on developing and overseeing a lung cancer curriculum for the institute and for integrating clinical care with research. She also will serve as co-director of the Lung Cancer Tumor Board.

Additionally, Reckamp will serve as the academic and administrative head of the Division of Medical Oncology, providing leadership and oversight. She will supervise and evaluate the quality of clinical care, medical staff effectiveness, and the delivery of inpatient and outpatient clinical activities to ensure the highest level of care for patients and their families.

Reckamp joins Cedars-Sinai from the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, where she served most recently as medical director of the Clinical Research Operations and Clinical Trials Office, chair of the Cancer Center scientific review committee and as co-director of the Lung Cancer and Thoracic Oncology Program.

Reckamp earned her medical degree from the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency, both in internal medicine, at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, followed by a fellowship in hematology/oncology and a master's degree in clinical research at UCLA. She is the recipient of more than a dozen national honors, scholarships and awards, including the STOP Cancer Carrie Scott Memorial Grant in 2018. Her research has been published in numerous academic medical journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine.

"I am excited about the opportunity to help continue to build a world-class cancer program, offering patients at Cedars-Sinai leading-edge technology, novel therapeutic options and compassionate care," Reckamp said. "The dedication to this mission is evident throughout the institution and surrounding community."

 

 

 

MD Who Volunteers as Reserve Officer Saves a Life on Duty

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Paul Strauss, MD, works as an anesthesiologist at Cedars-Sinai and also volunteers as an LAPD reserve officer. 

Los Angeles police raced to the scene early this month after getting a call about a military veteran threatening to kill herself.

Officers from the LAPD's Southwest Division found the woman in her bedroom unconscious and not breathing. But then one of them managed to quickly resuscitate her and kept her alive until an ambulance arrived.

The fast-thinking hero of the moment was someone who had seen plenty of life-and-death struggles, but he wasn't a regular police officer. Instead, he was a reserve officer, an LAPD volunteer.

At the Southwest station, he’s known as "Doc." But at Cedars-Sinai, he's Paul Strauss, MD.

For Strauss, it was his most dramatic day in law enforcement since he began living a double life two years ago, working both as a police officer and as an anesthesiologist.

The desire to save and protect lives on the street, as well as in the operating room, was a big part of what propelled Strauss, 63, to earn a badge.

"I can bring my life experience and skills in the medical world to the citizens of Los Angeles," said Strauss, a physician at Cedars-Sinai since 1999. "That’s what life's about. It's not so much about money. It's about helping people. I know it sounds corny, but it’s true."

What's more, Strauss clearly enjoys police work. He went through the rigors of police academy training, where he was the second-oldest in his class, so that he could become a Level I, or top-level, reserve officer. That enables him to serve as a street cop, sometimes even doing undercover duty in the vice unit.

Strauss now puts in about 20 hours a week as a reserve officer, prompting him to trim his hours at Cedars-Sinai while still remaining a full member of the medical staff.

Sgt. Gil Pedregon, one of Strauss’ supervisors at the Southwest station, said regular patrol officers typically don't have much interaction with reserve officers, some of whom come in only occasionally. But Strauss is another story.

"He's always willing to help out," Pedregon said. "We're very thankful that he takes the time to come to our station and not just work at the desk or do paperwork. He actually suits up, puts a vest on, full gear, and he goes out in the field and works."

Strauss and his patrol car partner were quick to the scene to provide backup on Jan. 2 when the call came in about the military veteran. A friend of hers made the call to police, after seeing that the woman posted "goodbye" messages on social media.

After arriving, Strauss said, officers found the woman on her side in bed, amid empty bottles of pills and alcohol. At that point, Strauss started performing a jaw thrust maneuver, which pulled the woman's jaw forward, opening her airway and providing stimulation that spurred her to start breathing again. He kept repeating the maneuver for about 20 minutes until the ambulance arrived and took her to a hospital, where she was treated.

LAPD Sgt. Roger Perez, who was Strauss' watch supervisor that day and who arrived on the scene as Strauss was performing the jaw thrusts, said his medical experience was plain to see. "He did what he had to do," said Perez, adding that other officers have benefited from learning about first aid from Strauss.

Strauss was tempted to contact the woman afterward to check up on her, but out of respect for her privacy, he hasn’t. "There's a lot of psychological implications of seeing the person who saved your life," Strauss added. "It's not clear-cut if that’s the right thing to do for her."

After growing up in New York, where his father sold textiles and his mother was a sewing instructor at Fashion Institute of Technology, Strauss stayed in the area for college, medical school and the rest of his medical training. He decided to specialize in anesthesiology.

"It matches my personality," said the ruggedly built Strauss, who often is described as passionate and energetic. "It's basically instant gratification. Things are happening fast, and you have a very big impact on keeping somebody alive. … Our skills are basically to keep people alive," especially in trauma cases.

For example, Strauss said, "treating people with overdoses on the street is nothing more than waking up somebody from anesthesia."

One of his goals is to teach better "real world" first-aid skills to more of his fellow officers, "and use my New York kind of personality to give the officers confidence they can do it."

James D. Grant, MD, MBA, chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at Cedars-Sinai, also noted parallels between the work Strauss does in medicine and with the LAPD.

"Anesthesiology involves a lot of split-second, lifesaving decisions. If you look at the work Paul's doing [for the LAPD], it’s sort of a lot of the same things," Grant said. "We resuscitate. We have to change course quickly. We have to be two steps ahead. There's not a lot of room for error in anesthesiology."

Grant, who came to Cedars-Sinai early last year, added that, "In my short time here, I've been continually impressed with Paul's commitment to working with the LAPD."

Strauss considered becoming a reserve officer for years. Through his passion for martial arts, an interest that goes back to his late teens, Strauss has gotten to know lots of law enforcement personnel. He remains a certified law enforcement training instructor for martial arts. In more recent years, he has taken firearms classes, and that put him in contact with more police officers.

Still, he held off from joining the police department because he didn’t want to take time away from his medical career. And then came the San Bernardino, California, terrorist shooting in December 2015 that killed 14 people.

Before then, Strauss explained, "I kept on thinking, 'I want to do this. I want to do this. I want to do this.' And when San Bernardino happened, it just hit close to home that an event like this can and probably will happen again in Los Angeles, and I want to be part of the response and help people survive that."

"My dream," he added, "is to share my real world first-aid skills with every street cop in Los Angeles."

 

Women's Blood Vessels Age Faster Than Men's

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A new Smidt Heart Institute study led by Susan Cheng, MD, MPH, MMsc, is helping to clarify differences between men and women with heart disease.

New research from the Smidt Heart Institute showed for the first time that women's blood vessels—including both large and small arteries—age at a faster rate than men's. The findings, recently published in the journal JAMA Cardiology, could help to explain why women tend to develop different types of cardiovascular disease and with different timing than men.

“Many of us in medicine have long believed that women simply 'catch up’ to men in terms of their cardiovascular risk,” said Susan Cheng, MD, MPH, MMSc, senior author of the study and director of Public Health Research at the Smidt Heart Institute. “Our research not only confirms that women have different biology and physiology than their male counterparts, but also illustrates why it is that women may be more susceptible to developing certain types of cardiovascular disease and at different points in life.”

Using community-based data amassed from multiple sites across the country, Cheng and her research team conducted sex-specific analyses of measured blood pressure – a critical indicator of cardiovascular risk. The data represented nearly 145,000 blood pressure measurements, collected serially over a 43-year period, from 32,833 study participants ranging in age from 5 to 98 years old.

Because a person’s risk for developing a heart attack, heart failure, or a stroke typically begins with having high blood pressure, Cedars-Sinai researchers combed through their massive data looking for clues and patterns regarding how blood pressure starts to rise. Then, instead of comparing the data from men and women to each other, investigators compared women to women and men to men.

This approach allowed investigators to identify that the progression and evolution of women’s vascular function is very different than for men. In fact, women showed signs of blood pressure elevation much earlier in life than men.

“Our data showed that rates of accelerating blood pressure elevation were significantly higher in women than men, starting earlier in life,” said Cheng, the Erika J. Glazer Chair in Women's Cardiovascular Health, who also serves as director of Cardiovascular Population Sciences at the Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center. “This means that if we define the hypertension threshold the exact same way, a 30-year old woman with high blood pressure is probably at higher risk for cardiovascular disease than a man with high blood pressure at the same age.”

Christine Albert, MD, MPH, founding chair of the newly established Department of Cardiology at the Smidt Heart Institute, says this new research should help guide clinicians and researchers to think differently when it comes to treating and studying women and their cardiovascular health.

“Our women’s heart health experts have a long history of advocating for adequate inclusion of women in research and the need to both recognize and study sex differences in cardiovascular physiology and disease,” said Albert. “This study is yet another reminder to physicians that many aspects of our cardiovascular evaluation and therapy need to be tailored specifically for women. Results from studies performed in men may not be directly extrapolated to women.”

 

 

 

 

New Guidelines for Vancomycin Dosing Start Feb. 18

Based on updated guidelines, the Department of Pharmacy Services is modernizing the process by which it doses vancomycin [area under the curve-based dosing (AUC24)], beginning Feb. 18. Benefits with AUC24 dosing include: improved efficacy and safety, reduced need for vancomycin level monitoring and reduced total daily doses of vancomycin.

  • Ordering vancomycin in CS-Link™ will remain the same for providers. Continue to order the “VANCOMYCIN PER PHARMACY” ERx [4080310001] in CS-Link.
  • Pharmacists will use vancomycin serum levels to calculate an AUC24 (a marker of total drug exposure over 24 hours).
  • To streamline lab orders, CS-Link lab orders for LAB41 (vancomycin peak) and LAB39 (vancomycin trough) will be removed—only LAB40 (vancomycin level) will remain in CS-Link.

If you have any questions, contact the antimicrobial stewardship pharmacists at 310-423-5352 or GroupPharmacyAUR@cshs.org.

FDA Strengthens Warning About Clozapine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is strengthening an existing warning that constipation caused by the schizophrenia medicine clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo ODT, Versacloz, generics) can progress to serious bowel complications. This can lead to hospitalization or even death if constipation is not diagnosed and treated quickly.

Clozapine affects how the intestines function in the majority of patients. It produces effects ranging from constipation (trouble having a bowel movement), which is a common occurrence, to serious but uncommon bowel problems including complete blockage of the bowel.

The FDA website has more information.

 

Medical Library Offers Classes to Learn New Skills

The Cedars-Sinai Medical Library is offering a variety of classes in February and March. Classes are at noon in the Medical Library—Plaza Level, South Tower, Room 2815.

PubMed

Learn to create search strategies and search the medical literature. Learn medical subject heading terms and field codes to get a more sensitive search. Create alerts to keep up with the latest research. The half-hour class will meet Tuesday, Feb. 11, at noon.

PsycINFO 

Learn how to use this database of 4 million citations that cover psychology, sociology, behavioral science and social work. The half-hour class will meet Tuesday, Feb. 25, at noon.

EndNoteX9 for PC

Learn how to use this citation manager to organize your search results for manuscripts and grants. The half-hour class will meet Tuesday, March 3, at noon.

Classes also are available by appointment. Call Caroline Marshall at ext. 3-2315 or RSVP to caroline.marshall@cshs.org.

CS-Link Tip: Storyboard

Storyboard in CS-Link™ doesn’t just provide a stunning new look to a patient's chart. It is packed with features and tools that are designed to make your workflow more efficient and decrease the need for mouse clicks.

Did you know, for example, that under each item in the Storyboard lies wonderful extra information related to that item? For example, if you are seeing a patient and would like to prescribe a medication but would like to first check their allergies, you only need to hover over the allergies section and—voilà—you are presented with a pop-up report detailing the items the patient is allergic to and their reactions.

No need to navigate away from you current activity or order entry field. If you wanted to add an allergy, clicking the section takes you right to the allergy activity. Similarly, Storyboard displays the most recent vital signs.

If you want to see the trend, however, just hover over the section and the pop-up report will show you the last three sets of measurements. If you need more information or want to add a new set of measurements, clicking once will take you to the appropriate vital signs activity.

Virtually every section in the Storyboard pane has this ability, which denotes many more use case scenarios exist where these pop-up hover reports help save you time and clicks to get your work done. Try it out yourself, hover and discover.

For more information, see the CS-Link job-aid on Storyboard. If you have questions, feel free to contact us at groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.