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PRODUCED BY AND FOR MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY October 2017 | Archived Issues

Mark Vrahas Named to New Endowed Chair

Mark Vrahas co

Mark Vrahas, MD, has been named the Levin/Gordon Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedics in Honor of Myles Cohen, MD. Vrahas, chair of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Orthopaedics, joined Cedars-Sinai in 2016 from Harvard Medical School, where he served as vice chair for Population Health and OR Operations at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, and as chief of Partners Orthopaedic Trauma Program at Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

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Two Minutes With …

This question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the faculty in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. This month's installment features Tsuyoshi Todo, MD.


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Physicians Publish on Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

Stereotactic body radiation therapy has demonstrated efficacy comparable to surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer, according to a new article authored by several Cedars-Sinai physicians in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology.

» Read more

Consumer Ratings No Panacea for Picking Doctors

urgent care co

Online consumer ratings parse everything from tasty burritos to hip beauty salons. While crowdsourced reviews can be helpful when picking a restaurant or hair stylist, are they useful for choosing a physician? Not entirely, according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators, which found that online physician ratings were unrelated to actual quality of care. Timothy Daskivich, MD, MSHPM, was the study's lead author.

» Read more

Melmed and Wallace Honored by Los Angeles County Medical Association

Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president, Academic Affairs, and dean of the Cedars-Sinai medical faculty, and Daniel J. Wallace, MD, FACP, associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Rheumatology Fellowship Program, will be honored by the Los Angeles County Medical Association at its Los Angeles Healthcare Awards Dinner Nov. 1 in Beverly Hills.

» Read more

How Vesicles Secreted by Cells Aid Cancer Growth

Di-Vizio-photo co

In a recently published study, a Cedars-Sinai team led by Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD, associate professor of Surgery, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, demonstrated that large oncosomes contribute to tumor growth. The team also identified the molecular mechanism by which large oncosomes play a role in communication between prostate tumors and the surrounding tissue.

» Read more

Encryption Service Upgrade Slated for Oct. 30

To improve online security, the encryption service for Cedars-Sinai will switch to Cisco IronPort beginning Monday, Oct. 30. Despite the rise in text messaging, instant messaging and social networking, email continues to be the main communication tool of business. Email, however, can be unsecure, and mishandling it can lead to the exposure of sensitive information.

» Read more

From Superman to Iron Man After Surgery

Gratitude Campaign - Tara and Bobby Vinson co

This story is part of an occasional series highlighting the #CedarsGratitude effort. Share why you are grateful for Cedars-Sinai here.

There are some things Bobby Vinson just won't do. He won't let his family down. He won't let his wife, Tara, train for marathons alone. And he won't complain or let his back problems interfere with the things he loves. He also won't let Arnold Chiari malformation, a rare condition that causes the lobes at the base of the brain to elongate and block or slow the flow of fluid into the spine, slow him down.

» Read more

FDA Issues Recommendation Against Intraocular Vancomycin

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a recommendation against the prophylactic use of intraocular vancomycin — alone or in a compounded drug combining multiple active ingredients — during cataract surgery because of the risk of hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis.

» Read more

Circle of Friends Honorees for September

CoF

The Circle of Friends program honored 256 people in September. Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai.

» Read more

CS-Link Tip: Upgrade to Reduce Screen Clutter

A new upgrade to CS-Link™ is planned to take effect the first week of November. The upgrade will reduce screen clutter and deliver a cleaner and more vibrant look.

» Read more

Mark Vrahas Named to New Endowed Chair

Mark Vrahas, MD

Mark Vrahas, MD, has been named the Levin/Gordon Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedics in Honor of Myles Cohen, MD.

Vrahas, chair of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Orthopaedics, joined Cedars-Sinai in 2016 from Harvard Medical School, where he served as vice chair for Population Health and OR Operations at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, and as chief of Partners Orthopaedic Trauma Program at Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

"An endowed chair is one of the highest honors an academic physician can receive," Vrahas said. "I am humbled by the recognition and grateful for the resources it provides to further the academic careers of young surgeons in my department."

The chair was established in honor of Myles J. Cohen, MD, a member of the Cedars-Sinai medical staff for 42 years. During that time, Cohen has served in several leadership roles. He spent six years on the Cedars-Sinai Board of Directors, including five years as chair of the board’s Medical Policy Committee. Cohen also has served as a member of the Medical Executive Committee and as clinical chief of Surgery. He is now chair of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Group Board of Directors and director of Hand and Upper Extremity Reconstructive Surgery at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Orthopaedics.

Cohen currently is director of Hand and Upper Extremity Reconstructive Surgery at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Orthopaedics and director of Surgery for Cedars-Sinai Medical Group.

"I feel privileged that this distinguished chair has been established in my honor," Cohen said. "I am extremely proud of what this hospital has become and to have my name permanently linked with our outstanding institution."

The endowed chair was made possible by the Don Levin Trust. The chairman of the trust’s board is Thomas D. Gordon, former executive vice president and chief executive officer of the Cedars-Sinai Medical Network and now a consultant to Thomas M. Priselac, president and CEO of Cedars-Sinai.

“I am especially privileged to dedicate this chair in honor of my dear friend and colleague, Dr. Myles Cohen," Gordon said. “Myles is the father of hand surgery at Cedars-Sinai and has dedicated his life to taking care of patients, mentoring young physicians and acting as a leader and role model to everyone he comes in contact with."

Gordon said the creation of the endowed chair is part of Cedars-Sinai’s efforts to attract and retain scholar-researcher-physicians of great distinction.

"Dr. Vrahas reached out to me early in his tenure at Cedars-Sinai to help understand the orthopedic landscape in our network and in the community," Gordon said. "I was extremely impressed by his decency, honesty and modesty. We have met several times since, and he continues to impress me with his appreciation for the whole being greater than the sum of its parts."

Vrahas said he plans to use support from the endowment to fulfill Cedars-Sinai’s mission to teach, innovate and provide quality care to patients and the community — much the way Cohen has done for more than four decades.

"We stand on the shoulders of giants, and Dr. Cohen is truly a giant," Vrahas said. "He exemplifies the ideal, not just as a physician and a surgeon, but as a human being. I’m thankful for the endless support and counsel he has provided me, and feel it my duty to live and work in his example."

Two Minutes With …

This question-and-answer feature will help you get to know some of the faculty in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery.

Tsuyoshi Todo, MDTsuyoshi Todo, MD

Where did you grow up?

I was born in Fukuoka, Japan, and grew up in Pittsburgh, a.k.a. "Steeler-Nation."

Why did you decide to specialize in transplant surgery?

My father is a liver transplant surgeon who trained and worked under Thomas Starzl, MD, who pioneered liver transplantation. At the time in the 1990's, they were doing about 600 liver transplants a year. I'm just following in his footsteps, maintaining the family business.

If you were not a physician, what career would you choose?

I would be a high school soccer coach and teach biology on the side.

Outside the OR, where do you find inspiration?

I find inspiration on the golf course. It's a great way to be outside enjoying (artificial) nature, focusing on improving my game, and being social with friends and colleagues at the same time. I also enjoy bicycling along the beach with my fianceé Susan and our puppy Donut. We work hard, so we can play hard.

What did your parent(s) always tell you that you now have to admit was correct?

My folks told me, "In order to succeed, you have not only do your best, but also be the best." Still trying to get there.

Is there something or someplace you have never seen that you would like to see in the near future?

I studied Greek history in college and was fascinated by their culture. It was surprisingly similar to Japanese culture in many ways. I'd love to visit the Greek islands one day.

Physicians Publish on Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has demonstrated efficacy comparable to surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a new article authored by several Cedars-Sinai physicians in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology.

Recent preclinical and clinical data indicate that immune-mediated mechanisms drive the efficacy of SBRT, but little is known about the nature of the immune response in the lung. The purpose of the study was to develop an immunocompetent orthotopic murine model of NSCLC for SBRT by combining an intrapleural injection with a small animal irradiation platform in order to study the underlying immunobiology of SBRT for lung tumors.

The article's authors from Cedars-Sinai included Fernando Espinoza-Mercado, MD, Harmik J. Soukiasian, MD, Amin J. Mirhadi, MD, and Zachary S. Zumsteg, MD.

Consumer Ratings No Panacea for Picking Doctors

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Online consumer ratings were unrelated to actual quality of care by physicians, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.

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Timothy Daskivich, MD, MSHPM

Online consumer ratings parse everything from tasty burritos to hip beauty salons. While crowdsourced reviews can be helpful when picking a restaurant or hair stylist, are they useful for choosing a physician?

Not entirely, according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators, which found that online physician ratings were unrelated to actual quality of care.

"Studies have shown that over 75 percent of patients are willing to make provider choices based on consumer ratings alone," said the study's lead author, Timothy Daskivich, MD, MSHPM, assistant professor of Urology and director of Health Services Research in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Surgery. "We wanted to raise awareness among patients that online consumer ratings may not be telling the entire story about how 'good' or 'bad' a physician really is."

Daskivich and his team compared consumer reviews of 78 Cedars-Sinai physicians with weighted, specialty-specific performance scores; primary care physician peer-review scores; and administrator peer-review scores. The performance scores included quality metrics, such as adherence to Choosing Wisely measures (electronic health record alerts guiding physicians toward appropriate care for patients), 30-day readmissions, length of stay and adjusted cost of care for patients.

The sample included physicians from eight medical and surgical specialties who used the health system’s electronic health records in their outpatient practices. The consumer ratings came from five popular online platforms: Healthgrades, Vitals, Yelp, RateMDs and UCompareHealthCare. Each website rates physicians using a five-star scale.

"We found that some highly competent doctors had lower consumer ratings," said study senior author Brennan Spiegel, MD, director of Health Services Research and professor of Medicine.

The study, published Sept. 8 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, found no significant association between average consumer ratings and performance scores. Among physicians in the lowest quartile for performance measures, only 5 to 32 percent had consumer ratings in the lowest percentile on the rating sites.

Consumer ratings were consistent across the websites, which suggested that they jointly measure a latent construct unrelated to performance, the study's authors said.

The team concluded that online consumer ratings should not be used in isolation to select physicians.

"While online ratings are very important in measuring some parts of the patient experience, such as service-related aspects, they are clearly not comprehensive in determining whether the care delivered is high quality," Daskivich said. "It appears that online ratings hold too much sway over how patients make decisions, out of proportion to what they offer in terms of a comprehensive assessment of a physician’s performance."

Additional authors from Cedars-Sinai included Justin Houman, MD, Garth Fuller, Jeanne T. Black, PhD, MBA, and Hyung L. Kim, MD.

Melmed and Wallace Honored by Los Angeles County Medical Association


Shlomo Melmed, MD


Daniel J. Wallace, MD

Shlomo Melmed, MB, ChB, executive vice president, Academic Affairs, and dean of the Cedars-Sinai medical faculty, and Daniel J. Wallace, MD, FACP, associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Rheumatology Fellowship Program, will be honored by the Los Angeles County Medical Association (LACMA) at its Los Angeles Healthcare Awards Dinner Nov. 1 in Beverly Hills. The annual event recognizes individuals and institutions for exemplary contributions to improving healthcare in Los Angeles County.

Melmed, professor of Medicine and the Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Distinguished Chair in Investigative Medicine, will receive the 2017 Hospital Physician Leadership Award. An internationally recognized authority on pituitary medicine, Melmed has helmed landmark studies uncovering mechanisms of pituitary tumor development and identified novel molecules as therapeutic targets. Over the course of his career, he has trained more than 70 physicians, scientists and graduate students who now occupy leading positions in academic endocrinology worldwide.

"Dr. Melmed has led the spectacular growth of world-class Cedars-Sinai programs in heart disease, cancer, regenerative medicine, neurosciences, surgical specialties, gastroenterology, transplantation, women’s health, metabolic and pulmonary disorders, as well as founding the Cedars-Sinai Graduate Program," said Troy Elander, MD, chair of the LACMA Patient Care Foundation. “These efforts have established Cedars-Sinai in the top echelons of America's academic medical centers."

"I am humbled by this award and consider it an affirmation of Cedar-Sinai's leadership position in delivering quality healthcare, expanding medical knowledge through research and training the next generation of physician-scientists," Melmed said.

Wallace, a professor in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine, will receive the 2017 Innovation Award for Community Service. For nearly 40 years, Wallace has been practicing clinical rheumatology with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). His office currently manages the care of some 1,500 SLE patients, which is among the largest practices of its kind nationwide. A highly accomplished investigator, Wallace opened one of the first clinical trial centers for developing targeted rheumatoid arthritis and lupus therapies, and is credited with discovering a new autoantibody that could prove pivotal in relation to SLE and accelerated aging.

Commenting on the award, Elander praised Wallace for being "our nation's most highly regarded physician in the care and treatment of patients diagnosed with lupus." He also applauded Wallace's founding of Lupus LA, a nonprofit organization that has raised more than $10 million for funding medical research, rheumatology fellowships and support services for lupus patients and their families throughout greater Los Angeles.

"This award is a tribute to the decades-long opportunity the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine and Division of Rheumatology have given me to try and make a difference in patients' lives," Wallace said.

Founded in 1871, LACMA is a professional organization representing more than 6,000 physicians.

How Vesicles Secreted by Cells Aid Cancer Growth

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Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD

In a recently published study, a Cedars-Sinai team led by Dolores Di Vizio, MD, PhD, associate professor of Surgery, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, demonstrated that large oncosomes contribute to tumor growth. The team also identified the molecular mechanism by which large oncosomes play a role in communication between prostate tumors and the surrounding tissue.

These findings suggest potential ways to identify aggressive forms of prostate cancer early in the disease process and block the spread of cancer. The findings also propose a new targetable mechanism — large oncosomes-mediated communication — for the development of new therapeutic approaches.

Large oncosomes are vesicles released by tumor cells that have the ability to metastasize to distant sites in the body. While only a small percentage of prostate cancers produce oncosomes, experimental data from the Di Vizio team suggests that prostate cancers that produce oncosomes at the beginning of the disease have a high probability of becoming aggressive later on.

Di Vizio's study, published in Cancer Research, examined the tissue around the tumor known as the stroma, or tumor microenvironment, and in particular cells called fibroblasts. Fibroblasts are benign cells that constitute the supportive structure for the tumor. The main goal of the study was to determine if and how large oncosomes could alter the stroma. Results show that large oncosomes activate specific pathways in the stroma, and that this activation results in a more tumor-permissive function of the stroma itself.

"We now know that once a tumor arises, the cancer cells 'communicate' with the tumor microenvironment, altering it in a way that contributes to the reprogramming of normal prostate stromal cells, which in turn helps the cancer cells to grow," Di Vizio said.

"If we identify at diagnosis the cancer patients who produce large oncosomes, we will be able to treat them with more aggressive strategies," she added. "We can leave patients with less advanced disease alone, allowing them to avoid treatments such as chemotherapy that can carry unpleasant side effects."

The study addresses a major clinical issue: how to predict whether prostate cancer in a given patient will become life-threatening. Overall, more than 98 percent of prostate cancer patients survive at least five years after diagnosis, according to the National Cancer Institute. But that figure falls below 30 percent if the cancer metastasizes.

"The criteria that have been used so far to distinguish between aggressive and non-aggressive cancer are imperfect," said Valentina R. Minciacchi, PhD, the study's first author. "When men are diagnosed with prostate cancer, predictions about metastasis are not reliable."

Di Vizio said her team hopes that understanding the early history of tumors and why some cells release oncosomes — prompting the growth of tumor cells — will help them find a way to block that mechanism with drug therapy.

"We’re learning that with prostate, breast and other cancers, if the stroma can provide resistance to the tumor cells, then the tumor won’t progress," Di Vizio said.

The study collaborators include Cedars-Sinai investigators Michael Freeman, PhD, Edwin Posadas, MD, and Neil Bhowmick, PhD, and Emanuele Cocucci, MD, PhD, of the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy. For a full list of authors, please see the published study.

The IRB number for human subjects in research referenced in this article is Pro00033050.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under award number P50 CA092131 and by funding from Avon Breast Cancer Foundation Fund 02-2013-043, the Martz Translational Breast Cancer Research Fund, Department of Defense (PC150836), the Steven Spielberg Discovery Fund in Prostate Cancer Research, and The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center (P30-CA016058) and an intramural fund (IRP46050-502339).

Encryption Service Upgrade Slated for Oct. 30

To improve online security, the encryption service for Cedars-Sinai will switch to Cisco IronPort beginning Monday, Oct. 30.

Despite the rise in text messaging, instant messaging and social networking, email continues to be the main communication tool of business. Email, however, can be unsecure, and mishandling it can lead to the exposure of sensitive information.

What this means for staff and employees:

  • Beginning Monday, Oct. 30, use the phrase "CSEncrypt" to encrypt emails, either external or internal.

The benefits of the service include:

  • Email sent internally can now be encrypted.
  • Encrypted emails will have Cedars-Sinai branding, making it easier for recipients to distinguish Cedars-Sinai official communications.
  • Setting up a secure account and opening emails will be more user-friendly for recipients, including easy-to-understand online instructions.

"It is the responsibility of everyone at Cedars-Sinai to take the handling of sensitive information seriously," said Chris Joerg, chief information security officer. "The best practice for securing email communications is through the use of encryption technology."

All sensitive information sent externally via email must be encrypted. This includes, but is not limited to: Patient Health Information (PHI), Personally Identifiable Information (PII) and Cedars-Sinai confidential information.

At a later date, an "encrypt email button" will be added to Cedars-Sinai email.

For questions, email information.security@cshs.org or call the EIS Service Desk at 310-423-6428.

From Superman to Iron Man After Surgery

Gratitude Campaign - Tara and Bobby Vinson 480px

Bobby and Tara Vinson

This story is part of an occasional series highlighting the #CedarsGratitude effort. Share why you are grateful for Cedars-Sinai here.

There are some things Bobby Vinson just won't do. He won't let his family down. He won't let his wife, Tara, train for marathons alone. And he won't complain or let his back problems interfere with the things he loves.

The people who know him best and love him most agree that his 28 years of life have been dedicated to making others happy, even when the condition he was born with sent pain through his body daily.

"He just never said anything,"  Tara said. "He hunted, fished, did anything any normal person would do — and you just couldn't tell how much he was hurting by his demeanor."

Bobby has Arnold Chiari malformation, a rare condition that causes the lobes at the base of the brain to elongate and block or slow the flow of fluid into the spine. This causes headaches, dizziness, and scoliosis — curvature of the spine.

In addition, he developed kyphosis, which caused a hunch in his back, and lordosis, sometimes called a swayback. It's a complicated trifecta of conditions that gave his back a distinct "S" curve, and no one in his home state of Montana had extensive experience treating all three.

He first had surgery for the condition when he was 15 years old to slow the progression of the diseases. By his 20s, the curvature in his back caused pain that made it hard for him to focus. The couple scoured the country looking for the right expert and settled on Robert Pashman, MD, at the Cedars-Sinai Spine Center.

To rid Bobby's back of the deformity, fix his pain and improve his quality of life, Pashman fused 13 of Bobby's vertebrae with 26 screws and two rods. After the 13-hour surgery, Pashman walked out to assure Tara and their family that everything had gone perfectly.

"He said my husband went from Superman to Iron Man," Tara said.

He spent a week at Cedars-Sinai recovering. The couple still remembers their caregivers by name, even more than a year later. The little touches made a big difference — helping Tara set up her cot with extra blankets, the night-shift nurse who would keep Tara company when she couldn't sleep, and the patience demonstrated by each staff member when the couple had many questions.

"We felt like we'd known our doctors and nurses for years," Bobby said. "Their humor and wit made the days pass quickly, and we never trusted anyone more in our entire lives. The nurses were amazing. Their compassionate care was unlike anything we'd ever seen."

A year after his intense surgery, Bobby now is cleared to do any physical activity he'd like, including his favorite: bow-hunting. He also can help with non-favorites like shoveling snow in the Montana winters and mowing the lawn in the summertime.

"You never really know how much you need your friends and family until you go through something like this," Bobby said.

"We've lived our lives thinking we were the loyal friends, colleagues and family members. But we're the lucky ones. We're really moved by all the generosity that's surrounded us in the last year. ‘Thank you' doesn't even begin to describe our feelings of gratitude."

Tara says the surgery and the care they received at Cedars-Sinai helped them both, and she couldn't be prouder of her husband. The couple started dating in high school. They have been together 12 years and married four. Now they're "parents" to their puppy Cooper.

"I wish I could say his demeanor and attitude have dramatically improved, but I can't because he's the most positive and kind person I've ever known, and that was before we ever made the trip down to L.A.," Tara said.

"Now he can smile for real, without the nagging pain in his back every day. His strength and courage in the face of two life-altering surgeries — followed by a yearlong recovery time — are so incredibly inspiring. I honestly believe Bobby could face any kind of hardship or difficult situation; he's just that person," she added.

Bobby is a grateful patient, and he and Tara are supporters of the Campaign for Cedars-Sinai. Learn more about the Campaign.

Are you a grateful patient, family member, volunteer or loyal supporter? We want to hear from you. Your story can inspire others who may be facing similar challenges — and most importantly, provide hope. Share your story of gratitude or see how others are sharing #CedarsGratitude.

FDA Issues Recommendation Against Intraocular Vancomycin

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a recommendation against the prophylactic use of intraocular vancomycin — alone or in a compounded drug combining multiple active ingredients — during cataract surgery because of the risk of hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV). HORV is a rare, potentially blinding postoperative complication that has been observed in dozens of patients who have received intraocular injections of vancomycin (anti-infective) formulations toward the end of otherwise uncomplicated cataract surgeries.

The FDA website has more information.

Circle of Friends Honorees for September

The Circle of Friends program honored 256 people in September.

Circle of Friends allows grateful patients to make a donation in honor of the physicians, nurses, caregivers and others who have made a difference during their time at Cedars-Sinai. When a gift is made, the person being honored receives a custom lapel pin and a letter of acknowledgement.

See more information about the program and a list of past honorees.

  • Shadi Abdelnour, MD
  • Mecca Adams, RN
  • Kenneth W. Adashek, MD, FACS
  • Keith L. Agre, MD
  • Ohara Aivaz, MD
  • Ria Aldanese, BSN, RN
  • Michael J. Alexander, MD, FACS
  • Daniel C. Allison, MD, MBA, FACS
  • Farin Amersi, MD
  • Neel Anand, MD
  • Paula J. Anastasia, MN, RN, AOCN
  • Arash Asher, MD
  • Laura G. Audell, MD, MS
  • Babak Azarbal, MD
  • Yalda Azarmehr, MD
  • C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA
  • Anca M. Barbu, MD
  • Leon I. Bender, MD
  • Peiman Berdjis, MD
  • Valerie Betley
  • Sushma Bhadauria, MD, FACOG
  • Satinder J. Bhatia, MD
  • Keith L. Black, MD
  • Mary G. Brandon, RN, ACNP-BC
  • Earl W. Brien, MD
  • Wendy Briggs
  • Philip G. Brooks, MD
  • Eileen G. Brown, RN, OCN
  • Neil A. Buchbinder, MD, FACC
  • Matthew H. Bui, MD, PhD
  • C. Michele J. Burnison, MD
  • Stephanie Bustos
  • Brendan J. Carroll, MD
  • Ilana Cass, MD
  • David H. Chang, MD
  • Dorrie Chang, MD
  • Timothy Charlton, MD
  • Derek Cheng, MD
  • Joshua S. Chung, MD
  • Susan B. Clark, RN
  • Hart C. Cohen, MD
  • Myles J. Cohen, MD
  • Susan L. Colar
  • Steven D. Colquhoun, MD
  • Alice C. Cruz, MD
  • Arlen Y. Cuadra, LVN
  • Scott A. Cunneen, MD
  • Shaun S. Daneshrad, MD, FACC
  • Catherine M. Dang, MD, FACS
  • Brittney A. Daniels, RN
  • Dudley S. Danoff, MD, FACS
  • Robert W. Decker, MD
  • Ryan DellaMaggiora, MD
  • Premal J. Desai, MD
  • Candace M. DeSarro
  • Stephen C. Deutsch, MD, FACP
  • Victor M. Donado
  • Noam Z. Drazin, MD
  • J. Kevin Drury, MD, FRCPC, FACC
  • Julie A. Dunhill, MD
  • Ashkan Ehdaie, MD
  • Karyn S. Eilber, MD
  • Jonathan C. Ellis, MD
  • Ali John Enayati, MD, MPH
  • Alan D. Engelberg, MD
  • Eva Erdan
  • Fardad Esmailian, MD
  • Richard Essner, MD, FACS
  • Jeremy A. Falk, MD
  • Charles A. Forscher, MD
  • Steven D. Frankel, MD
  • Eli S. Gang, MD
  • Alexandra Gangi, MD
  • Avrom Gart, MD
  • Diane Gean Gomez, CN
  • Ivor L. Geft, MD
  • Joel M. Geiderman, MD, FACEP
  • Leena C. Gibson, MD
  • Armando E. Giuliano, MD, FACS, FRCSEd
  • Richard N. Gold, MD
  • Neil J. Goldberg, MD
  • Theodore B. Goldstein, MD
  • Gloria A. Gomez
  • Nestor Gonzalez, MD
  • Mark O. Goodarzi, MD, PhD
  • Jeffrey S. Goodman, MD, FACP, FACC
  • Martin N. Gordon, MD
  • Richard E. Gould, MD
  • Stephen L. Graham, MD
  • Jeffrey R. Gramer, MD
  • Paul B. Hackmeyer, MD
  • David S. Hallegua, MD, FACR
  • Michele A. Hamilton, MD
  • Nirmeen Hannis Youssef, PA-C
  • Michael D. Harris, MD
  • Andrew E. Hendifar, MD, MPH
  • Jeremy R. Herman, MD
  • Emmanuel E. Hernandez
  • Daniel A. Hoffman, DO
  • David M. Hoffman, MD
  • Arash A. Horizon, MD, FACR
  • J. Patrick Johnson, MD
  • Stanley C. Jordan, MD
  • David Y. Josephson, MD
  • Kamran Kalpari, MD
  • Saibal Kar, MD
  • Sheila M. Kar, MD
  • Beth Y. Karlan, MD
  • David Kawashiri, MD
  • Ilan Kedan, MD, MPH, FACC, FASE
  • Elena M. Kerdmanee
  • Chae Y. Kim, MD
  • Hyung L. Kim, MD
  • Jason B. Kirk, MD
  • Michelle M. Kittleson, MD, PhD
  • Stephanie Koven, MD
  • Michael A. Kropf, MD
  • Martyna O. Kulawiuk
  • Todd H. Lanman, MD, FACS
  • Zsofia Laszlo, NP
  • Gary Leach, MD
  • Norman E. Lepor, MD, FACC, FAHA, FSCAI
  • Keren Lerner, MD
  • Ronald S. Leuchter, MD
  • Michael M. Levine, MD
  • Meldon C. Levy, MD, FACC
  • Jeffrey R. Lewis, MD
  • Burton A. Liebross, MD
  • Michael C. Lill, MD, MB, BS, FRACP, FRCPA
  • Debora Lindsay
  • Milton T. Little, MD
  • Cynthia A. Litwer Schwieger, MD
  • Gene Liu, MD
  • Simon K. Lo, MD, FACP
  • Sylvia G. Lopez
  • Cheryle C. Maano Requejo, BSN, RN, OCN
  • David P. Magner, MD, FACS
  • Ezra Maguen, MD
  • Rajendra Makkar, MD
  • Harumi O. Mankarios, RN, OCN
  • Jolene Martinez
  • Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)
  • Guy S. Mayeda, MD
  • Peggy Mays
  • Philomena McAndrew, MD
  • Brianna McCarthy
  • Robert J. McKenna Jr., MD
  • Bin Mclaurin
  • Sharron L. Mee, MD, FACS
  • Gil Y. Melmed, MD, MS
  • Richard J. Metz, MD, FACP
  • Anne Meyer, MD
  • Becky J. Miller, MD
  • Anna Milstein, MD
  • Amin J. Mirhadi, MD
  • Monali Misra, MD
  • Monica M. Mita, MD, MDSc
  • Mary Alice Modders
  • Charles N. Moon, MD
  • Hattie M. Munn
  • Stephanie Munoz, RN
  • Reiad Najjar, MD
  • Mamoo Nakamura, MD
  • Ashkan L. Naraghi, MD
  • Shawn S. Nasseri, MD
  • Youram Nassir, MD
  • Ronald B. Natale, MD
  • Norman J. Nemoy, MD
  • Anita N. Newman, MD, FACS
  • David G. Ng, MD
  • Julia K. Nicholls
  • Nicholas N. Nissen, MD
  • Mazen Noureddin, MD
  • Geri O'Neill, BSN, RN, PHN
  • Adrian G. Ostrzega, MD
  • Randy Palacios
  • Dorothy J. Park, MD
  • Jignesh K. Patel, MD, PhD
  • Rachel C. Pearl, MD
  • Brad Penenberg, MD
  • Tiffany G. Perry, MD
  • Glenn B. Pfeffer, MD
  • Edward H. Phillips, MD, FACS
  • Edwin M. Posadas, MD
  • Dechu P. Puliyanda, MD
  • Shervin Rabizadeh, MD, MBA
  • David S. Ramin, MD
  • Vicki H. Rapaport, MD
  • Alexandre Rasouli, MD
  • Chrystal M. Reed, MD, PhD
  • Ali Rezaie, MD, MSc, FRCPC
  • Bobbie J. Rimel, MD
  • Avery Robinson
  • Sonja L. Rosen, MD
  • Barry E. Rosenbloom, MD
  • Fred P. Rosenfelt, MD
  • Christian Rozo
  • Paula J. Rubin
  • Wendy L. Sacks, MD
  • Nancy J. Salinas, RN
  • Vivian L. Salle, RN
  • Tracy Salseth, ACNP-BC
  • Howard M. Sandler, MD, MS
  • Gregory P. Sarna, MD
  • David Savar, MD
  • Jay N. Schapira, MD, FACP, FAHA, FCCP, FACC
  • Kevin S. Scher, MD, MBA
  • Wouter I. Schievink, MD
  • Jessica L. Schneider, MD
  • Laurence Seigler, MD
  • Aamir S. Shah, MD, FACS
  • Prediman K. Shah, MD
  • Edward J. Share, MD
  • Nancy L. Sicotte, MD, FAAN
  • Robert J. Siegel, MD
  • Allan W. Silberman, MD, PhD, FACS
  • Thomas P. Sokol, MD, FASCRS
  • Richard Sokolov, MD
  • Mitchell J. Spirt, MD
  • Andrew I. Spitzer, MD
  • Theodore N. Stein, MD
  • Jerrold H. Steiner, MD, FACS
  • Daniel J. Stone, MD, MPH, MBA
  • Leslie M. Stricke, MD, FCCP
  • Ronald Sue, MD
  • Joseph Sugerman, MD
  • Vinay Sundaram, MD, MSC
  • Steven N. Sykes, MD
  • Steven W. Tabak, MD
  • Nattapaun Thepyasuwan, DO
  • Sasha S. Tissot
  • Tommy H. Tomizawa, MD, MPH
  • Sam S. Torbati, MD
  • Tram T. Tran, MD
  • Alfredo Trento, MD, FACS
  • Richard Tuli, MD, PhD
  • Justin Ugaldo
  • Mark K. Urman, MD, FACC, FASE, FAHA
  • Bryant Uy, PA
  • Jennifer Van Eyk, PhD
  • Angela W. Velleca, BSN, RN, CCTC
  • Swamy R. Venuturupalli, MD, FACR
  • Daniel J. Wallace, MD, FACP, FACR
  • Xunzhang Wang, MD
  • Jonathan M. Weiner, MD
  • Mark A. Weissman, DPM
  • Denyele Wheat, RN
  • Donald A. Wiss, MD
  • Yu-Tung Wong, MD
  • Glen M. Wool, MD
  • Payam R. Yashar, MD, FACC
  • Laura S. Young, MJS, BCC
  • John S. Yu, MD
  • Phillip C. Zakowski, MD
  • Raymond Zimmer, MD
  • Millard H. Zisser, MD

CS-Link Tip: Upgrade to Reduce Screen Clutter

A new upgrade to CS-Link™ is planned to take effect the first week of November. The upgrade will reduce screen clutter and deliver a cleaner and more vibrant look.

The upgrade will include replacing some onscreen text with icons. If users aren’t sure what an individual icon means, they can hover over it and a bubble will indicate its purpose.

Also, HealthStream offers physician efficiency training modules for continuing medical education credit. There are 22 modules that last 15 minutes each. They include topics such as "In Basket Quick Actions," "Smart Blocks in Progress Notes" and "SmartList Editor."

To take advantage, log into HealthStream and search the catalog using keywords: PET CME. Select the module you want to view, then click "Enroll."

CSLink tip- Physician Efficiency Training

If you have questions, contact groupeisphysicians@cshs.org.